100 Unique and Creative Travel Words with Beautiful Meanings

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Everyone (who knows me) knows how I love words. I hoard words . Everyone also knows how I love to travel. I eat, drink, and sleep travel 🙂 Here, in this post, I’ve blended two of my passions – words and travel. The post rounds up the creative travel words that describe wanderlust perfectly. You’ll never be at a loss for words while narrating your travel experiences once you equip yourself with these unique words about travel.

Unusual Travel Words with Beautiful Meanings

Wanderlust (n.).

Origin: German Pronunciation: vawn-duh-luhst Meaning: a strong desire to travel

Resfeber (n.)

Origin: Swedish Pronunciation: race-fay-ber Meaning: the restless race of the traveler’s heart before the journey begins, when anxiety and anticipation are tangled together; the nervous feeling before undertaking a journey

Related Read: 27 Cool Swedish Words You Must Know

Strikhedonia (n.)

Origin: Greek Pronunciation: strik-he-don-e-a Meaning: the joy of being able to say “to hell with it”

Eleutheromania (n.)

Origin: Greek Pronunciation: eleuthero-ma-nia Meaning: an intense and irresistible desire for freedom

Origin: Hawaiian Pronunciation: ak-i-hi Meaning: listening to directions and then walking off and promptly forgetting them

akihi travel words

Exulansis (n.)

Origin: The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows Pronunciation: exu-lan-sis Meaning: the tendency to give up trying to talk about an experience because people are unable to relate to it — whether through envy or pity or simple foreignness—which allows it to drift away from the rest of your life story, until the memory itself feels out of place, almost mythical, wandering restlessly in the fog, no longer even looking for a place to land.

Hodophile (n.)

Origin: Greek Pronunciation: hodo-phile Meaning: a lover of roads; one who loves to travel

Saudade (n.)

Origin: Portuguese Pronunciation: sau-da-de Meaning: a nostalgic longing for something or someone that was loved and then lost, with the knowledge that it or they might never return; “the love that remains”

Fernweh (n.)

Origin: German Pronunciation: feirn-veyh Meaning: an ache for distant places; a longing for far-off places; an urge to travel even stronger than wanderlust; being homesick for a place you’ve never been

Selcouth (adj.)

Origin: Old English Pronunciation: sel-kooth Meaning: unfamiliar, rare, strange, and yet marvelous

selcouth travel words

Serendipity (n.)

Origin: English Pronunciation: seh-ruhn-di-puh-tee Meaning: finding something good without looking for it

Pilgrimage (n.)

Origin: Latin Pronunciation: pil-gruh-mij Meaning: a journey, especially a long one, made to some sacred place as an act of religious devotion

Gökotta (n.)

Origin: Swedish Pronunciation: yo-kot-ah Meaning: literally translates to the early cuckoo morning or dawn picnic to hear the first birdsong; the act of rising early in the morning to hear the birds sing at sunrise and appreciate nature

Schwellenangst (n.)

Origin: German Pronunciation: shwel-en-ahngst Meaning: fear of embarking on something new; fear of crossing a threshold

Voyage (n.)

Origin: Latin Pronunciation: voy-ij Meaning: a long journey involving travel by sea or in space

voyage travel words

Origin: Japanese Pronunciation: yoo-gehn Meaning: a profound awareness of the universe that triggers emotional responses too deep, powerful, and mysterious for words

Origin: Danish Pronunciation: hue-gah Meaning: the Danish practice of creating warmth, connection, and well-being; a complete absence of anything annoying or emotionally overwhelming; taking pleasure from the presence of gentle, soothing things; celebrating the everyday

You Might Like: Cool Danish Words We Need in English Now

Vagary (n.)

Origin: Latin Pronunciation: va-ga-re Meaning: an unpredictable instance, a wandering journey; a whimsical, wild, and unusual idea, desire, or action

Origin: Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows Pronunciation: mo-rii Meaning: the desire to capture a fleeting experience

“With every click of the shutter, you’re trying to press pause on your life. If only so you can feel a little more comfortable moving on living in a world stuck on the play.”

Musafir (n.)

Origin: Arabic Pronunciation: mu-sa-fir Meaning: traveler

Musafir remains one of my most favorite words associated with travel.

musafir travel words

Odyssey (n.)

Origin: Greek Pronunciation: aw-duh-see Meaning: a long and eventful or adventurous journey or experience

Sonder (n.)

Origin: The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows Pronunciation: sohn-dehrr Meaning: the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own—populated with their own ambitions, friends, routines, worries and inherited craziness—an epic story that continues invisibly around you like an anthill sprawling deep underground, with elaborate passageways to thousands of other lives that you’ll never know existed, in which you might appear only once, as an extra sipping coffee in the background, as a blur of traffic passing on the highway, as a lighted window at dusk.

Gadabout (n.)

Origin: Middle English Pronunciation: gad-uh-bout Meaning: a habitual pleasure-seeker; a person who moves about restlessly and aimlessly, especially from one social activity to another; a person who travels often or to many different places, especially for pleasure

Acatalepsy (n.)

Origin: Greek Pronunciation: ey-kat-l-ep-see Meaning: incomprehensibleness; the impossibility of comprehending the universe; the belief that human knowledge can never have true certainty

acatalepsy travel words

Origin: Greek Pronunciation: noh-mad Meaning: a person who does not stay long in the same place; a wanderer

Cockaigne (n.)

Origin: Middle English Pronunciation: ko-keyn Meaning: an imaginary or fabled land of luxury and idleness

Origin: The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows Pronunciation: o-ni-sm Meaning: the awareness of how little of the world you’ll experience

“The frustration of being stuck in just one body, that inhabits only one place at a time, which is like standing in front of the departures screen at an airport, flickering over with strange place names like other people’s passwords, each representing one more thing you’ll never get to see before you die—and all because, as the arrow on the map helpfully points out, you are here.”

Nemophilist (n.)

Origin: Greek Pronunciation: ni-mo-fi-list Meaning: a haunter of the woods; one who loves the forest for its beauty and solitude

Trouvaille (n.)

Origin: French Pronunciation: troo-vee Meaning: a lucky find; a chance encounter with something wonderful and valuable

trouvaille travel words

Safarnama (n.)

Origin: Persian Pronunciation: su-fur-nama Meaning: travelogue; an account of the travels

Smultronställe (n.)

Origin: Swedish Pronunciation: smool-tron-stall-uh Meaning: literally translates to place of wild strawberries; a special place discovered, treasured, returned to for solace and relaxation; a personal idyll free from stress or sadness

Livsnjutare (n.)

Origin: Swedish Pronunciation: livs-noo-tuhreh Meaning: literally translates to enjoyer of life; someone who loves life deeply and lives it to the extreme

Wayfarer (n.)

Origin: Old English Pronunciation: wey-fair-er Meaning: someone who travels, especially on foot

Kopfkino (n.)

Origin: German Pronunciation: kof-kino Meaning: literally translates to head cinema; the act of playing out an entire scenario in your mind

kopfkino travel words

Hireath (n.)

Origin: Welsh Pronunciation: her-rith Meaning: a homesickness for a home to which you cannot return, a home which maybe never was; the nostalgia, the yearning, the grief for the lost places of your past

Peripatetic (n.)

Origin: Greek Pronunciation: per-uh-puh-tet-ik Meaning: a person who travels from place to place

Luftmensch (n.)

Origin: Yiddish Pronunciation: looft-mensh Meaning: literally translates to an air person; an impractical dreamer with improbable plans and no business sense; one with their head in the clouds

Solivagant (adj.)

Origin: Latin Pronunciation: soh-lih-va-ghent Meaning: wandering alone

Waldeinsamkeit (n.)

Origin: German Pronunciation: vahyd-ahyn-zahm-kahyt Meaning: literally translates to woodland solitude; the feeling of being alone in the woods

waldeinsamkeit travel words

Ecophobia (n.)

Origin: English Pronunciation: eco-phobia Meaning: a fear or dislike of one’s home

Origin: Japanese Pronunciation: u-key-yo Meaning: literally translates to the floating world; living in the moment, detached from the bothers of life

Meraki (n.)

Origin: Greek Pronunciation: may-rah-kee Meaning: to do something with soul, creativity, and love; when you leave a piece of yourself in your work

Wabi-sabi (n.)

Origin: Japanese Pronunciation: wabe-sabe Meaning: finding beauty in imperfections; an acceptance of things as they are

Vorfreude (n.)

Origin: German Pronunciation: vor-froy-dah Meaning: the joyful, intense anticipation that comes from imagining future pleasures

vorfreude travel words

Cosmopolitan (n.)

Origin: English Pronunciation: koz-muh-pahl-i-ten Meaning: belonging to all the world; not limited to just one part of the world; someone who has traveled a lot and feels at home in any part of the world

Peregrinate (v.)

Origin: Middle English Pronunciation: per-i-gruh-neyt Meaning: to travel or wander from place to place

Sojourn (n.)

Origin: Latin Pronunciation: soh-jurn Meaning: a temporary stay

Shinrin-yoku (n.)

Origin: Japanese Pronunciation: shin-rin-yo-ku Meaning: literally translates to forest bathing; a leisurely trip to the forest for recreation, relaxation, meditation, and therapy

Origin: Thai Pronunciation: ti-eow Meaning: to wander or roam around in a carefree way

tîeow travel words

Origin: Serbian Pronunciation: mir-ak Meaning: enjoyment of the simple things in life; the feeling of bliss and sense of oneness with the universe that comes from the simplest of pleasures; the pursuit of small, daily pleasures that all add up to a great sense of happiness and fulfillment

Dépaysement (n.)

Origin: French Pronunciation: de-pe-iz-ma Meaning: the feeling that comes from not being in one’s home country; disorientation due to experience of unfamiliar surroundings; being out of your element like a fish out of water

Itinerant (n.)

Origin: Latin Pronunciation: ai-ti-nr-uhnt Meaning: one who travels from place to place

Numinous (adj.)

Origin: Latin Pronunciation: noo-muh-nuhs Meaning: having a strong religious or spiritual or supernatural quality; indicating or suggesting the presence of divinity; describing an experience that makes you fearful yet fascinated, wed yet attracted – the powerful, personal feeling of being overwhelmed and inspired

Heimweh (n.)

Origin: German Pronunciation: haim-ve Meaning: homesickness; nostalgia; a longing for home

heimweh travel words

Sprachgefühl (n.)

Origin: German Pronunciation: shprahkh-guh-fyl Meaning: the character and spirit of a language; an intuitive sense of the rule and rhythm of language

Mångata (n.)

Origin: Swedish Pronunciation: mo-an-gaa-tah Meaning: the glimmering, roadlike reflection of the moonlight on water

Dromomania (n.)

Origin: Greek Pronunciation: dro-mo-ma-nia Meaning: an uncontrollable impulse or desire to wander or travel

Sehnsucht (n.)

Origin: German Pronunciation: zen-zukt Meaning: the inconsolable longing in the human heart for we know not what; a yearning for a far, familiar, non-earthly land one can identify as one’s home

Dérive (v.)

Origin: French Pronunciation: de-rive Meaning: literally translates to drift; a spontaneous and unplanned journey where the traveler leaves their life behind for a time to let the spirit of the landscape and architecture attract and move them

dérive travel words

Absquatulate (v.)

Origin: English Pronunciation: ab-skwoch-uh-leyt Meaning: to leave abruptly without saying goodbye

Thalassophile (n.)

Origin: Greek Pronunciation: thal-as-o-fahyl Meaning: a lover of the sea; someone who loves the sea or ocean

Yoko meshi (n.)

Origin: Japanese Pronunciation: yoh-koh-mesh-ee Meaning: literally translates to a meal eaten sideways; refers to the peculiar stress of speaking a foreign language

Forelsket (v.)

Origin: Norwegian Pronunciation: phor-rel-sket Meaning: the euphoria you experience when you are first falling in love

Read More: 14 Beautiful Norwegian Words We Need in English Now

Rückkehrunruhe (n.)

Origin: The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows Pronunciation: rukee-ren-ruhee Meaning: the feeling of returning home after an immersive trip only to find it fading rapidly from your awareness—to the extent you have to keep reminding yourself that it happened at all, even though it felt so vivid just days ago—which makes you wish you could smoothly cross-dissolve back into everyday life, or just hold the shutter open indefinitely and let one scene become superimposed on the next, so all your days would run together and you’d never have to call cut.

rückkehrunruhe travel words

Eudaimonia (n.)

Origin: Greek Pronunciation: u-de-mon-e-a Meaning: literally translates to human flourishing; a contented state of being happy, healthy, and prosperous

Sturmfrei (adj.)

Origin: German Pronunciation: stirm-fra Meaning: literally translates to storm-free; the freedom of not being watched by a parent or superior; being alone in a place and having the ability to do what you want

Origin: Mandarin Chinese Pronunciation: yu-yi Meaning: the desire to see with fresh eyes, and feel things just as powerfully as you did when you were younger-before expectations, before memory, before words

Photophile (n.)

Origin: English Pronunciation: pho-to-phile Meaning: Derived from the biological term “photophilic” for an organism that thrives in full light, it means a person who loves photography and light

Traipse (v.)

Origin: Unknown Pronunciation: trayps Meaning: to walk or go aimlessly or idly or without finding or reaching one’s goal

traipse travel words

 Neophile (n.)

Origin: Greek Pronunciation: neo-phile Meaning: one who loves or has a strong affinity for anything new or novel

Ballagàrraidh (n.)

Origin: The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows Pronunciation: bal-la-ga-rye Meaning: the awareness that you are not at home in the wilderness

Vacilando (v.)

Origin: Spanish Pronunciation: vah-see-lan-doh Meaning: to wander or travel with the knowledge that the journey is more important than the destination

Quaquaversal (adj.)

Origin: Latin Pronunciation: kwey-kwuh-vur-sul Meaning: moving or happening in every direction instantaneously

Coddiwomple (v.)

Origin: English Pronunciation: kod-ee-wom-pul Meaning: to travel in a purposeful manner towards a vague destination

coddiwomple travel words

Vemödalen (n.)

Origin: The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows Pronunciation: ve-mo-da-len Meaning: the fear that everything has already been done

“The frustration of photographing something amazing when thousands of identical photos already exist—the same sunset, the same waterfall, the same curve of a hip, the same closeup of an eye—which can turn a unique subject into something hollow and pulpy and cheap, like a mass-produced piece of furniture you happen to have assembled yourself.”

Commuovere (v.)

Origin: Italian Pronunciation: com-muo-ve-re Meaning: a story that touches or stirs you and moves you to tears

Natsukashii (adj.)

Origin: Japanese Pronunciation: nat-soo-kash-ee Meaning: of some small thing that brings you suddenly, joyously back to fond memories, not with a wistful longing for what’s past, but with an appreciation of the good times

Querencia (n.)

Origin: Spanish Pronunciation: keh-rehn-syah Meaning: a place from which one’s strength is drawn, where one feels at home; the place where you are your most authentic self

Novaturient (adj.)

Origin: Latin Pronunciation: no-vah-ter-y-ent Meaning: desiring or seeking powerful change in one’s life, behavior, or situation

novaturient travel words

Komorebi (n.)

Origin: Japanese Pronunciation: koh-moh-ray-bee Meaning: sunlight that filters through the leaves of trees

Flâneur (n.)

Origin: French Pronunciation: flah-nœr Meaning: one who strolls around aimlessly but enjoyably, observing life and his surroundings

Hanyauku (v.)

Origin: Kwangali Pronunciation: ha-ahn-yoh-kuu Meaning: to walk on tiptoes across the warm sand

Dès Vu (n.)

Origin: Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows Pronunciation: des-vu Meaning: the awareness that this will become a memory

Gallivant (v.)

Origin: English Pronunciation: gal-uh-vant Meaning: go around from one place to another in the pursuit of pleasure or entertainment

gallivant travel words

Nefelibata (n.)

Origin: Portuguese Pronunciation: ne-fe-le-ba-ta Meaning: literally translates to cloud-walker; one who lives in the clouds of their own imagination or dreams, or one who does not obey the conventions of society, literature, or art; an unconventional or unorthodox person

Petrichor (n.)

Origin: English Pronunciation: pet-ri-kawr Meaning: a distinctive scent, usually described as earthy, pleasant, or sweet, produced by rainfall on very dry ground; the smell of earth after rain

Circumnavigate (v.)

Origin: Latin Pronunciation: suh-kuhm-na-vuh-gayt Meaning: to sail or travel all the way around the world

Hitoritabi (n.)

Origin: Japanese Pronunciation: hitori-tabi Meaning: traveling alone; a solitary journey

Torschlusspanik (n.)

Origin: German Pronunciation: tursh-luss-pan-ik Meaning: literally translates to gate-closing panic; a sense of anxiety or fear caused by the feeling that life’s opportunities are passing by and diminishing as one ages

torschlusspanik travel words

Globetrotter (n.)

Origin: English Pronunciation: globe-trawt-uh Meaning: a person who travels widely

Menggonceng (v.)

Origin: Indonesian Pronunciation: menggon-ceng Meaning: to travel by getting a free ride, usually on the back of a friend’s bicycle

Vagabond (n.)

Origin : Old French Pronunciation: va-guh-baand Meaning: a person who wanders from place to place without a home or job

Gemütlichkeit (n.)

Origin: German Pronunciation: guh-myt-likh-kahyt Meaning: a feeling of cozy warmth, friendliness, and good cheer with a sense of belonging

Erlebnisse (n.)

Origin: German Pronunciation: ayr-leeb-nis-eh Meaning: an experience that one feels most deeply, and, in a sense, ‘lives through’ – not just mere life experience, but something memorable which happens to someone

erlebnisse travel words

Livslogga (v.)

Origin: Swedish Pronunciation: Meaning: literally translates to life log; continually capturing and documenting one’s life through pictures

Poudrerie (n.)

Origin: French Pronunciation: pu-dre-ri Meaning: fallen snow blown by the wind from the ground, appearing like fine powdery particles across the streets and highways

Yeoubi (n.)

Origin: Korean Pronunciation: yu-bi Meaning: literally translates to fox rain; a sunshower – the event of having a light rain while the sun is still shining

Morriña (n.)

Origin: Galician Pronunciation: mo-rina Meaning: a very deep, nostalgic, and melancholic homesickness experienced as one intensely longs to return home; “a ‘saudade’ so strong it can even kill”

 Víðsýni (adj.)

Origin: Icelandic Pronunciation: vith-see-nee Meaning: a panoramic view

Xenophilia (n.)

Origin: Greek Pronunciation: zen-uh-fil-ee-uh Meaning: love for, attraction to, or appreciation of foreign people, manners, customs, or cultures

xenophilia travel words

Do you have other words that describe travel? Send them over! We’d be happy to add them to our list of words for travel lovers.

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creative travel words

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Get Inspired

42 inspiring travel words (besides wanderlust).

We’ve all tried to find words to describe a travel experience, and sometimes nothing seems to quite explain it right.

I love discovering new ways to express myself, and over the years I’ve slowly collected the below list of creative travel words that are either not commonly used in English or are from another language or are words that describe travel emotions we go through much better.

Travel Words

If you’re a bit of a Pinterest addict like me you might have heard some of these alternative words for travel before, but hopefully, some are new.

After all, we could all use some other words for wanderlust!

These are just a few of my favourite words associated with travel.

As someone who writes about travel all the time, I love finding new words for travel and to describe travel experiences.

Inspiring Travel Words - Montenegro

Everyone knows wanderlust, but are there words for wanderlust in other languages, or even just another word for travel too? 

I first wrote this post back in 2015 with just 24 new travel words that I had found over the course of the year while I was living abroad in Spain .

Since then I’ve come across many more so I’ve updated it to include the new ones!

Each travel word definition has been written in my own words, with a photo of my own, and examples from my own experiences. 

I hope that you’re able to learn some new words for travel (that aren’t wanderlust but are other words for wanderlust!) and be a bit inspired by them like I have been!

The unusual travel words you need to know:

Resfeber  (n), origin – swedish.

The tangled feelings of fear and excitement before a journey begins.

This is one of the most popular words associated with travel and all over Pinterest!

We’ve all felt this. That jolt in your heart when you book your flights, or when you tell your family and friends what you’re about to do.

Now that feeling has a word you can use!

This feeling is for new travellers and old alike. I still feel it when I embark on new journeys, especially before I moved to Spain to teach English .

resfeber travel words

Fernweh (n)

Origin: german.

Farsickness. An urge to travel even stronger than wanderlust.

That feeling you get when you’ve been home too long and you ache to be out into the world again.

Sometimes you don’t know where you want to be, but you know that it’s away. Sometimes you know where, and you want to get there as quickly as possible. This is that feeling.

I’ve had a serious case of the post travel blues , and felt this to the extreme!

It’s one of my favourite words related to travel, since it really does describe how I’ve felt on so many different occasions.

fernweh travel words

Origin: French

To drift unplanned, led only by the landscape and architecture around you.

The idea that even if you drift you will end up falling into a path that is lined out for you by your surroundings. This could describe life overall, but it also describes small journeys.

When you’re wandering through a new city and you just happen to wander on a path that takes you to great discoveries.

This happened to me in Stockholm, when I went to the archipelago and saw absolutely nothing of the city, and again in Lisbon where we made no plans and just let the city show us where to go.

This is a travel word I’ve seen less often, probably because many of us love to plan our trips, tick things off a bucket list and not miss out, but sometimes if you just allow yourself to wander you’ll find the most unexpected and best things of your trip.

derive travel word - wandering led only by the landscape

Numinous (adj)

Origin: latin.

Feeling both fearful and awed by what is before you.

I don’t know why but there’s something intriguing about finding Latin words for travel. Maybe it’s because it’s not a language we really use anymore, but it forms the basis for so much of ours now.

There are quite a lot of words for travelling that are Latin based, or that we can turn into a word associated with travel.

Firstly referring to divinity, but I think it is a wonderful way to describe how you feel when you see things that are so amazing you’re not sure whether to be amazed or realise your own insignificance in the world. It’s the magical feeling when you see something truly awe-inspiring, be it the scenery before you, or just something amazing falls into place when you’re travelling.

Visiting the rice terraces of China was that moment for me.

numinous travel words

Schwellenangst (n)

Fear of crossing a threshold to embark on something new.

Ok so this German word isn’t traditionally a word related to travel but it could be used as one of those words to describe a travel experience now.

Maybe referring literally to a door, but a great way to explain that feeling you might have before deciding to set out on a new journey.

Did you make the right decision? Those questioning feelings now have a name. I thought I might have made a mistake in moving to Spain but really, it was just this feeling of fearing something new.

schwellenangst travel words

Strikhedonia (n)

Origin: greek.

The joy of being able to say “to hell with it”.

A popular Greek word associated with travel!

This is what you can do when you decide to quit everything, stop making excuses , and explore the world.

Something you say when you book your flights or you decide to do something on your journey that you wouldn’t normally do. You’re travelling, who cares right?!

Now you have a word related to travel for that awesome feeling.

strikhedonia travel words

A wandering or roaming journey.

An unpredictable idea, desire or action.

Travelling without knowing the destination, and it doesn’t matter.

I got completely lost with friends in the Alpujarras in southern Spain , and it didn’t matter one bit. This is another Latin word for travel that we should definitely bring back into our vocabulary!

vagary travel words

Sehnsucht (n)

A wistful longing and yearning in the heart for travels that have been and travels to come.

When you’re not travelling this can be an overwhelming feeling, or when you think about the travel you’ve done and you wish you could relive it all over again.

This feeling is why you need to make the most of every moment! It’s why the more you travel, the harder it gets .

This is one of those other words for wanderlust that we could use instead, although not as easy to say I admit!

sehnsucht travel words

Eleutheromania (n)

The intense desire for freedom.

This is probably one of the closest words to explaining wanderlust in different languages. People often say that travelling makes them feel free, and eleutheromania is the desire for this feeling.

We seem to find freedom in other cultures, or just in being outside the norm, and when you stop travelling, you crave it again.

I think this is what led me to make the crazy decision to move abroad for the first time at 16 !

Definitely one of my favourite other words for wanderlust and a firm favourite on Pinterest when you look for travel words.

eleutheromania travel words

Livsnjutare (n)

Origin: swedish.

Someone who loves life deeply and lives it to the extreme.

Someone I try to be. One that takes chances, takes risks, and always chooses the adventure .

This other word for travel could be used in place for wanderluster, nomad or traveller.  We could all stand to appreciate what we have and make the most of life, and so this is an inspirational travel word! 

livsnjutare travel words

Sturmfrei (adj)

The freedom of being alone and having the ability to do what you want.

Travelling solo can be especially rewarding because it’s all up to you. You can make your travel journey exactly how you want it to be. No compromises, no one else to please. Just you and the road.

You might meet amazing people when you travel , but being on your own is real freedom.

This isn’t traditionally a word associated with travel either, but instead with being in a place alone or without supervision from your parents, so like when they leave you at home for the weekend as a teenager.

But isn’t that slightly giddy feeling of being able to do whatever we want similar to how we feel when we travel? No one’s watching, so you can be who you want and let go!

sturmfrei travel words

Solivagant (adj)

Wandering alone.

The kind of traveller many of us are. Solo travel has exploded so much that it is no longer out of the ordinary.

As most solo travellers know, you’re not alone for long as you make your friends on the road . But sometimes, it’s the wandering journey you take alone that is the most rewarding.

This is a word for someone that travels a lot or someone on a solo journey.

It’s definitely a popular description amongst travel bloggers too!

solivagant travel words

Saudade (n)

Origin: portuguese.

Nostalgia and the love that remains. A desire to be near to something or someone distant.

This is a travel word for after your journey ends and you just want to be back where you were, or with the people you met on the way. It’s the feeling that’s left after it all ends.

It’s what makes you want to return to your favourite place , even if you know it might not be the same. Part of the definition of this travel word is also about looking forward positively to the future!

saudade travel words

Origin: Japanese

An awareness of the universe that triggers emotional responses too deep and mysterious for words.

That feeling when it’s dark and you look at the stars and your wonder for all the things in the world wells up inside of you.

I felt like this when I saw the northern lights in Iceland during the wintertime . It was the most amazing experience and if I had any word to describe it then this would be it!

Other words for wanderlust or travel - yūgen

Acatalepsy (n)

The idea that it is impossible to truly comprehend anything.

Acatalepsy is a word that we can associate with travel. 

Can you truly understand your travels, the things you see, and how they affect you?

Sometimes it takes time to process how travel might have changed your life, and sometimes we never truly know why we take the journeys we do and what they’ll mean for us until afterward.

We can reflect on amazing travel moments , but never fully know their impact until much later! 

acatalepsy travel words

Origin: In doubt

The realisation every person is living their own vivid life.

I stumbled across this word and fell in love with the meaning, as it’s something I sometimes think about. How each person’s life is as full of different connections, memories, and possibilities as my own.

Although research tells me Sonder may not be a real word, the concept is beautiful and I think it can be a word closely associated with travel.

When we’re travelling we realise how everyone is living their own different and vivid life, sometimes close to our own and sometimes on a completely other level!

sonder travel words

Trouvaille (n)

Something lovely found by chance.

A street, cafe, an experience stumbled upon by luck.

I love when this happens in my travels. A moment drinking coffee under a lemon tree in the south of Spain , a garden or a lake or a swimming hole discovered with no one else around.

I love finding alternative words to describe a travel experience, and this is a great one! It’s so important to appreciate the little things, especially when we come across them in an unexpected way. 

trouvaille travel words

Origin: Danish

The cosy feeling you get while you’re enjoying the good things in life with friends.

When you’re out for a meal with people you met during your travels , and you feel content and right.

That feeling that you’re right where you’re meant to be.

This isn’t traditionally associated with travel and has become much more popular in recent years as a word describing a Danish way of living.

This word is now much more popular and well known than when I first wrote this post when I was an expat ! When I first came across it in 2015 I’d never heard of it before at all!

And I love that.

To me, it sounded like a word to describe the experiences I’d had while travelling, when I’d met an amazing group of people and we were enjoying a shared meal together at the end of an awesome day of exploring.

hygge travel words

Origin: The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows – John Koenig

Awareness of how little of the world you’ll experience.

When you’re staring at the departures board and wishing you could go to all of those places at once.

It’s possible that the more you travel the harder it gets , and this is one of the reasons why. You can live abroad to try and travel more, but there’s still only so much to be seen.

This travel word is a little different in that it isn’t from another language but instead from a book.

However, it is another word that describes travel in that you’ll never reach the end of your exploration.

Travelling just makes you realise how much of the world there is still to see, and fuels your wanderlust even more!

onism travel words

Novaturient (adj)

A desire to change and alter your life.

This word for travel lovers describes the feeling that pushes you to travel.

When you know you’re not living the life you could be and there must be more out there for you.

It’s time to go and find it . I’ve never regretted travelling or moving abroad , even alone . It’s this knowledge and this feeling that makes me keep doing it!

novaturient travel words

Yoko meshi (n)

The stress of speaking a foreign language.

Literally translates to, “a meal eaten sideways”, and how I felt about speaking Spanish when I moved to Spain!

When people would tell me to “just start speaking” and it’s really not that easy.

Can you really learn a language just by moving abroad ? Maybe not, but you can try. Just be prepared for this feeling that you now have a travel word to describe!

yoko meshi travel words

Selcouth (adj)

Origin: old english.

Strange and uncommon, the way you see things when you travel.

Everything seems different and foreign, and it’s a good thing. We travel to seek out the things we don’t have at home .

This is another word that we can make into a word for travel, even though it doesn’t traditionally mean that.

It is one I could kind of see myself using to describe the odd things I’ve come across while travelling!

selcouth travel words

Eudaimonia (n)

The contented happy state.

That bursting feeling in your chest when you travel when it all feels right. The constant change in travel often puts our senses in overdrive and the highs are higher than ever. 

Learning to dive on the Great Barrier Reef was one of the best experiences of my life, and I won’t soon forget this feeling.

This Greek word is actually related to a philosophy that has been translated as meaning happiness or well-being, but I think that it’s the way we often feel when we travel, so it’s a word for travel lovers too!

eudaimonia travel words

Coddiwomple (v)

Origin: english slang.

To travel purposefully towards a vague destination.

When you have an idea of where you’re going, but it doesn’t matter how long it takes to get there.

The road doesn’t have to be a straight one. In fact, sometimes it’s better when it’s not .

I love this travel word because I can imagine an old English gentleman discussing his latest “coddiwomple”!

coddiwomple travel words

Flâneur (n)

Someone who strolls aimlessly but enjoyably, observing life and the surroundings.

This is what I love to do when I get to a new city, or through the countryside .

When we travel we seem to have fewer worries in general, allowing us to place ourselves more IN the moment.

Plus walking a city and people watching is a great way to learn about a new culture! It’s also a lovely way to spend a romantic date !

unusual travel words - flaneur

Nefelibata (n)

“Cloud-Walker”. One who lives in the clouds of their own imagination, or who does not obey the conventions of society, literature or art. An unconventional person.

Probably the way people have described me on occasion!

For those who don’t travel, or don’t know how to begin, the idea can seem fantastical and unconventional.

But these days there are so many people breaking free of “cubicle” life and working as digital nomads with the world as their office, working different travel jobs ,  saving to move abroad , or taking a year off to travel. Phil and I now work for ourselves and travel as we like (with kids!).

It may be unconventional to some, but for the rest of us, it’s life.

unusual travel words - nefelibata

Brumous (adj.)

Origin: english.

Of gray skies and winter days, filled with heavy clouds or fog.

This may be a travel word you only use if you travel to the United Kingdom, especially in Scotland (it’s not the weather though, you just need the right clothes !)

It’s well known as the land of rainy days and fog, and I’ve experienced first hand.

However, I visited the Isle of Skye , one of the beautiful places in the UK, in the wind and rain and it was no less amazing. So really, I don’t mind if I have to describe some of my travels this way.

unusual travel words - brumous

Vorfreude (n)

The joyful, intense anticipation that comes from imagining future pleasures.

When we book a new trip and in the time before we go, this is the way we often feel.

We can think about the people we’ll meet , and all the exciting things we’re going to experience.

I love watching movies about places I want to go and then imagining myself there too, which is basically this feeling!

unusual travel words - vorfruede

Commuovere (v)

Origin: italian.

Heartwarming, something that stirs and moves you.

I love finding new words that don’t translate into English. This one is a prime example of a word that is difficult to explain, but the best I can do is heartwarming, something that moves you to tears in a good way.

Maybe you’re wondering how this relates to travel… crying?!

Well, I’ve definitely shed a few tears over travel, from the good to the bad, and I’ve definitely been moved and awed by the things that I’ve seen.

unusual travel words - commuovere

Peregrinate (v)

Travel or wander around from place to place.

A pretty simple word that we could use to describe our travels and yet it seems to have fallen out of favour. “We peregrinated around the Scottish Highlands .” It works right?!

unusual travel words - peregrinate

Nemophilist (n)

Origin: english.

A haunter of woods, one who loves the forest and it’s beauty and solitude.

There’s something magical about walking through the woods, and even more so in a foreign country.

When I lived in Canada on a study abroad one of my favourite things to do was wander through the huge forests there. So much so my new friends and I once got lost for 8 hours…

unusual travel words - nemophilist

Querencia (n)

Origin: spanish.

The place where you are your most authentic self, from where strength is drawn, where you feel at home.

I’m so excited to have a Spanish word, after learning Spanish while giving in Spain.

This word comes is related to the verb querer , which is to want or desire.

It can be associated with bullfighting, as it is also the name for the area of the bullring where the bull takes its stand, but I like to think of it more as a travel word, of course.

unusual travel words - querencia

Komorebi (n)

The sunlight that filters through the leaves of trees.

If you’re on those forest walks when you’re travelling like above, then this is hopefully what you’ll see!

Another unusual word that doesn’t translate directly into an English word, but one that describes a beautiful sight.

unusual travel words - komorebi

Hireath (n)

Origin: welsh.

A homesickness for a home to which you cannot return, a home which maybe never was. The nostalgia, the yearning, the grief for the lost places of your past.

Homesickness isn’t quite the right translation for this beautiful Welsh word, it’s more than that. It’s one of my favourites though as I often reminisce about my previous travels and times in my life.

It’s strange to think back to times like our babymoon in France , and how we had no idea what was ahead of us. As much as I love our life now I sometimes wish to live those times again!

unusual travel words - hireath

Smultronställe (n)

Literally “place of wild strawberries” a special place discovered, treasured, returned to for solace and relaxation; a personal idyll free from stress or sadness.

When I went to Luleå in the north of Sweden in summer we discovered wild strawberries growing on an island in the middle of the archipelago.

That’s what I think of when I see this word because what better place to be? These are often the kind of places we discover when we travel.

unusual travel words - Smultroställe

Mångata (n)

The reflection of the moon on the water.

Something I only seem to see or see the most when I’m travelling.

It reminds me of being by the sea, of the Full Moon Party in Thailand and of the early darkness when I lived in the Gold Coast, Australia, where this photo was taken!

unusual travel words - mangata

Photophile (n)

Origin: possibly english or greek.

A person who loves photography and light.

This one is a little in dispute. It could originate from the word for organisms that love light, “photophilic”, but have been adjusted to fit with photographers too.

Or, it could come from the same origins as “hodophile” in that “phos” means light and “philos” means friends. I can’t find concrete evidence either way, but that’s the beauty of finding new words!

Photophiles carry their camera wherever they go, and many travellers now do the same.

I used to have an old point and shoot camera, and then I stuck to mostly iPhone before finally getting a “proper” camera. I’ve been testing it out in Spain at places like the Alhambra , and in Portugal around the streets of Lisbon .

But there was nothing quite like the midnight sun in Luleå last summer.

unusual travel words - photophile

Dépaysement (adj.)

Feeling that comes from not being in one’s own country. Being out of your element, a fish out of water.

Living abroad has often made me feel like this , especially in the early days.

Sometimes we can idealise moving abroad and not realise how it will affect us , but eventually, a place will feel like home, even if it’s a different concept of home than before.

unusual travel words - depaysment

Hodophile (adj.)

“Lover of roads”. One who loves to travel.

Does this travel word really need an explanation?

There’s something magical about setting out on a trip with the open road before you. My absolute favourite was driving across the Nullabor in Australia! It’s one of the longest straight roads in the world.

unusual travel words - hodophile

Cockaigne (n)

Origin: an english word with french origin.

Imaginary land of luxury and idleness; the land of plenty.

This word originates from a medieval myth, a land of plenty where society’s restrictions are defined and the harshness of life in medieval times does not exist.

Although we’re not in this time anymore, we could use this word to describe our ideal land of plenty now. One where people are not persecuted for their religion or race, one where equality reigns supreme, maybe one we will all be able to travel to one day?

unusual travel words - cockaigne

Wayfarer (n)

Someone who travels, especially on foot.

Maybe not as unusual a word as some on this list, and one that you may already know. I considered making this my blog name when I started blogging !

It’s a word that makes me think of older times when people travelled in a more whimsical way that had nothing to do with social media. You went wherever the wind took you!

unusual travel words - wayfarer

Absquatulate (v)

Origin: north american english.

To leave without saying goodbye.

Invented in the US in the 1830s as a word that sounded vaguely Latin, to make it seem older.

It means to make off with someone or something without announcing you’re going! The way many of us might feel we want to leave for our travels. No fuss, please!

unusual travel words - absquatulate-2

Have you heard of these travel words and would you use them? Do you think they explain things better than we usually can?

If you liked them, pin them!

Sonja - Migrating Miss

Sonja is from New Zealand but now lives in Scotland with her husband and two little boys, after having lived in 5 other countries along the way including the USA, Australia, Canada, and Spain. Travelling has always been her passion and she has now made it her full-time job and worked in the industry for the last 8 years. She shares her living abroad experiences and best tips to make your travel experiences the best they can be!

55 thoughts on “ 42 Inspiring Travel Words (Besides Wanderlust) ”

Amazing list! Looking to impress a number of my fellow travelers with this list now!

I swear some of them can be worked in to normal conversation! Others may be a little different but it’s so nice to have words that describe those travel feelings.

Sonja, that’s a great one!! Sharing it all over now:) love all the words and the idea of such a post:)

Thanks so much Monika! I have been sitting on all of these for a long time. They are saved all over my phone and written in personal journals, so I thought it was time to share!

I’d add: ecdemomania <3

That’s a good one I didn’t have! I’ll have to add it to the next list 🙂

I absolutely love these! I so often find myself having a hard time describing my deep seeded need to get away, always be moving, or travel solo. The long pause and struggle I have to express the answer to “why” when asked about my journeys can feel very awkwardly isolating, and not in the good way of standing alone on a mountain top or wandering an empty desert. I like to feel all alone in the world sometimes but other times, I want to be a part of something, a community, and understood. Seeing words like you have dug up to share in this post do just that. The fact that there are words in so many languages to describe exactly how I feel, means that I am not really alone, even when I have been on a road with no signs of humans for days!

Thanks Bethany! You are definitely not alone! I too loved discovering that there are words that actually describe how I feel when I can’t even really describe it myself. It means that there are other’s that have felt like this, and so much so that whole words have been created for it. I hope you find a way to explain how you feel and why you want travel and movement in your life. All the best x

Wow, I love these, thank-you!

Thanks! I’ve been collecting them for awhile, I love finding out about different words that we can use to explain our feelings, not that I would end up actually saying most of these!

Your list of words is awesome! But Germans actually don’t use “sturmfrei” in the context of traveling. It’s being said when your parents have left home for one or more nights so you can invite friends and party. 😉 it’s not a description about how we feel, it’s more a description of the situation itself. I definitely like your interpretation – hopefully it’ll become a part of travelers diaries.

Thanks Josi! It’s good to know the real meaning behind the word. I like the idea of trying to adapt it as a travel word too, so fingers crossed others see it like you too! 🙂

Thank you Sonja, This was a fun list. I doubt I will be able to work them into my vocabulary. I don’t think I can even pronounce most of them. Perhaps it would be fun to have a follow up post that included the pronunciation of each. You clearly have comfort with many languages. I envy that. Happy Trails to You, Michelle

Haha no they are not exactly everyday words! I think a few may be easier than others, but anyone actually understanding them is the problem! I love the idea that sometimes other languages can explain things better than English though, and I do find it fascinating in learning Spanish that things are not always a direct translation. The use of words can be so different! Happy travels to you too!

I loved reading these words! Thanks for finding them and creating the pin for them! What an excellent way to express our traveling emotions!

Thanks so much! You’re most welcome :). I have to admit I don’t use them a whole lot in my blog writing, but I just love them!

I love your words. Thank you.

Thanks for your comment!

This is a great list, I enjoyed it! Thanks. However, I just want to correct a minor detail. While I was reading along, I got surprised by the word “onism” as I am Danish and has never in my life heard of this word before, whereas “hygge”, the other Danish word on your list, is very commonly used. I looked up “onism” on the internet and found that it comes from The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows which is a compendium of invented words written by John Koenig. I suppose it is made as a combination between the words “monism” (Greek?) and “onanism” (English?), so there is nothing Danish about its origin (at least not that I could find) x

Thanks Ida! I tried to research everything as much as I could (hours in fact haha) and I’m not sure how I ended up with that one! I’ll take another look but I suspect I’ll find the same as you and change it! Thanks again 🙂 x

I loved reading this post and found myself relating to almost every one! ? Thought the accompanying photos were perfect too. It’s given me inspiration for a new travel/art journal …

Thanks so much! It makes me really happy to hear I’ve given someone else inspiration 🙂 🙂

Wow !! Love them.. I was actually looking for a new word which would describe my travel agency. I think I should be able to come up with something using the list of words, u’ve mentioned in this post.

That’s great I’m glad they’re able to help you! Best of luck.

Thnx a lot for giving this sort of knowledge about the words who r completely new to me. Keep posting these words along with their meaning it helps a lot.

Thanks dea… It perfectely helped me to explain my inner feelings , but some words have difficulty in pronouncing . I wrote down every word in ma notebook for future description pf my Travel Thanks alot yaar <3

Hi, I would like to know if there is a word for this feeling describes below,

‘I feel at home when I’m travelling, but when I’m actually at home, I feel weird.

I don’t think wanderlust is the word, can you please help me?

I’m sorry I’m not sure! I only know these words and the other post I did about unusual travel words. It’s possible something exists though and I’ll keep an eye out since I love finding unusual words 🙂

Was looking for travel words from Greek origin, and have found it, thanks so much. Love your page as well, maybe we see each other on the road sometime 🙂

Thanks so much! I’m glad they’re useful 🙂

So who copied who? 🙂 https://www.theintrepidguide.com/travel-words-that-describe-wanderlust-perfectly/#.WjWJFCPMwmo

Great list!

OMG!!!! Thanks for bringing this to my attention!!! I can’t believe how similar some of the wording of this is!!! 🙁 🙁 🙁 I first published this in early 2016.

Thank you for compiling such a great list! I may be incorrect, but shouldn’t ‘Vagary’ be listed as a noun rather than a verb?

It appears it’s listed as a noun now to mean something unpredictable but it came from the verb to wander!

So great to see Eleutheromania included in the list, passionate about freedom!

One of my favourites!

This is a very impressive, creative and original list. Will revisit many times. Thanks for sharing 🙂

42? How did anyone even get to this comment section? I had to scroll for 2 days just to get to leave this comment. This is really outrageous. 7 would have been plenty. We are internet users here, not book readers.

Two days well spent I’m sure 😉

When one is confined within the four corners of the home, because of the pandemic, this list is very encouraging! Thank you Sonja, many of the words here describes various emotions I have already experienced. Two more weeks of lockdown, I have time to do a project, finding my travel photos that match the words :).

Love this post! I’m feeling so much fernweh at the moment <3

Same here!!

Thank you so much for these! At this time of great challenges in the world, it is comforting to know that I can read the wonderful words you have compiled to capture all the positive feelings travel evokes. Slainte!

I couldn’t find all of these travel words anywhere else. You know, I am gonna bookmark it right away. Thanks for sharing these travel phrases. I love it. Looking forward to reading more of these informative articles 🙂

Amazing read. Needed these for getting a travel domain name. Bookmarked this post already. It’s very useful. Looking forward to reading more of these awesome travel blogs.

Ha ha what a random post! Learned so many new words from this, excited to casually *drop* them into my conversations

Haha so many! I mean, half I think I’ve never said but it’s fun to learn their meaning and find words that can describe the things we feel and think when we travel x

Wonderful article, it must have taken a lot of work to put together so many words 🙂

Thanks! I collected them over a few years and then reworded in my own words :).

Nice article. Thanks for sharing these travel phrases. Looking forward to reading more of these informative articles .

Stunning article, loved to read. will read more for sure…

Was very helpful article

I love this list of inspiring words for travel! I’m always looking for new ways to explore new places and this list has given me some great ideas.

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Other Words For Travel: 57 Creative Words That Inspire The Wanderer In You

smarter word for travel

The crystal clear waters of Antigua, the rich greenery of the Cliffs of Moher , and the vibrant blues in Morocco, our words can truly paint a picture of the world’s most incredible places .

When you’re itching to travel again, check out a few other words for travel used to describe what you’re feeling and write it in your travel journal .

Here are 57 creative travel words that will inspire the wanderer in you.

Wanderlust [won-der-​lust] Noun | German A strong longing for or impulse toward wandering.

Eleutheromania [ell-uth-ero-may-nia] Noun | Greek A mania or frantic zeal for freedom.

Fernweh [feirn-veyh] Noun | German A deep desire to get away to a foreign place . Direct translation: “distance-sickness.”

Cockaigne [ko-keyn] Noun | French An imaginary land of luxury and idleness. This term comes from the French phrase pais de cocaigne , which means “the land of plenty.”

Quaquaversal [kwah-kwuh-VUR-sal] Adjective | Latin Everything is moving or happening in every direction, wanting to do and see all the things at once in a new place.

Dérive [derry-vay] Noun |  French An unplanned journey where a traveler allows themselves to be guided by the landscape. Dérive means “drift,” so even if one drifts, they will end up on the right path.

Sonder [son-der] Verb | Unknown The realization that each person that passes through your life is living a life as complex as your own.

Heimweh [hime-vay] Noun | German A longing for home or a homesickness for foreign lands.

Hygge [hoo-ga] Noun | Danish A quality of coziness and comfortable friendliness that engenders a feeling of contentment or well-being.

Serendipity [ser-en-dip-ity] Noun | English The occurrence and development of events by chance in a happy or beneficial way.

Resfeber [race-fay-ber] Noun | Swedish The restless race of the traveler’s heart before the journey begins when anxiety and anticipation come together. Most often just before buying plane tickets, a mix between excitement and sickness.

smarter word for travel

Strikhedonia [strick-a-donia] Noun | Greek The joy of being able to say, “to hell with it”.

Musafir [myou-sa-fur] Noun | Urdu A traveler.

Vuslat [voos-lot] Noun | Turkish A reunion after being apart for some time, between oneself and one’s beloved.

Yūgen [you-gen] Noun | Japanese A profound awareness of the Universe that triggers emotional responses too deep and powerful for words.

Dépaysement [dé-pé-i-ze-man] Adjective | French The feeling of not being in one’s own country, like a fish out of water.

Gadabout [ga-du-bowt] Noun | English A person who travels often or to many different places.

Hireath [he-rith] Noun | Welsh A homesickness for a home which you cannot return, maybe one that never existed.

Sturmfrei [sh-turm-fry] Adjective | German The freedom of being alone and having the ability to do what you want.

Ecophobia [eco-phobia] Noun | English A fear or disliking of one’s home, wanting to be somewhere else.

smarter word for travel

Numinous [noo-muh-nuhs] Adjective | Latin The feeling of being in awe, a combination of both fear and fascination, by what is before you. Also refers to having a strong religious or spiritual quality, but can be used to describe feeling in awe for what is before you.

Schwellenangst [Sch-vell-enn-ong-st] Noun | German Schwelle (threshold) and angst (anxiety), come together to explain the feeling of crossing a threshold to start a new chapter. The feeling before you decide to set out on a new journey, of whether or not you are making the right decision.

Vagary [vay-ga-ree] Verb | Latin A whimsical or roaming journey. In Latin, vagārī means “to roam.”

Trouvaille [troo-vy] Noun | French A chance encounter on a journey, with something wonderful or unexpected.

Saudade [sou-dod] Noun | Portugese The state of nostalgia or longing for someone or someplace far away. Described as “The love that remains” after someone is gone.

Solivagant [soh-LIH-va-ghent] Adjective | Latin Hopeless wanderer. An adventurer who travels or wanders the globe solo. The Latin word solivagus , means lonely or solitary.

Sehnsucht [zane-zoo-kt] Noun | German A wistful longing and yearning in the heart for travels past and future, or a longing for a far-off place, but not one which one can identify at the moment.

Acatalepsy [Akk-at-a-lepsy] Noun | Greek In philosophy, it is incomprehensibility or the impossibility of comprehending or conceiving a thing.

smarter word for travel

Livsnjutare [livs-new-tara] Noun | Swedish A person who loves life deeply and lives it to the fullest. In Swedish, this word translates to “enjoyer of life.”

Commuovere [como-vary] Verb | Italian The ability to touch or move something to tears.

Yoko meshi [Yo-ko-meh-she] Noun | Japanese The stress of speaking a foreign language . In Japanese, “meshi” means “boiled rice” and “yoko” means “horizontal,” altogether it means “a meal eaten sideways.” “Yoko” also references the fact that Japanese is often written vertically when most languages are written horizontally.

Onism [own-ism] Noun | Danish Refers to the understanding and frustration that one will never be able to see it all, that one can only occupy one space at a time.

Flâneur [flan-air] Noun | French A person who strolls aimlessly, simply wandering to explore a new place and observe the life that is there.

Wayfarer [way-fair-er] Noun | English A traveler. Someone who lets the wind blow them wherever they are meant to go.

Hodophile [Ho-dough-phile] Adjective | Greek  Someone who loves to travel, or “lover of the road.”

Novaturient [no-va-tur-ee-ent-a] Adjective | Latin A desire to change your life.

Coddiwomple [codd-ee-womp-el] Verb | English To travel with purpose to a destination, not concerned about how long the journey takes.

Selcouth [sell-cuth] Adjective | English Finding beauty in the unfamiliar or strange. Experiencing a new culture and place that feels different, but still fascinating and beautiful.

Eudaimoni [u-day-mon-ee-a] Noun | Greek The state of happiness one experiences while traveling.

Nefelibata [Neh-fell-ee-ba-ta] Noun | Portugese “Cloud-walker,” or an unconventional person. One who lives with their head in the clouds.

Vorfreude [for-fr-oy-da] Noun | German The excited feeling before you journey off somewhere new. Joyful, intense anticipation of all the exciting things to come.

Nemophilist [nee-mo-fil-ist] Noun | English A person who loves the forest in all its beauty and solitude.

Querencia [kay-ren-see-ya] Noun | Spanish The place where you feel the most at home.

Komorebi [ko-mo-reh-be] Noun | Japanese The sunlight that filters through the leaves of the trees.

Smultronställe [smul-trons-tell-ah] Noun | Swedish A special place that’s been discovered and returned to for relaxation or solace, “place of wild strawberries.”

Thalassophile [Thal-ass-o-feel] Noun | Greek A lover of the ocean.

smarter word for travel

Mångata [mon-ga-ta] Noun | Swedish The reflection of the moon on water.

Yu yi [you-yee] Noun | Mandarin The desire to see with fresh eyes and feel things just as intensely as you did when you were younger — before expectations, before memory, before words.

Photophile [fo-tow-feel] Noun | English or Greek A person who loves photography and light.

Waldeinsamkeit [Vall-d-on-zom-kite] Noun | German The feeling of being alone in the woods, in a positive, peaceful, relaxing way.

Meraki [meh-rah-kee] Adjective | Greek Doing something with soul, creativity, and love. Putting a part of yourself into what you’re doing.

Forelsket [fur-ell-skit] Adjective | Danish The euphoria you experience when you are first falling in love with a person or a place.

Peripatetic [perr-a-puh-tet-ik] Adjective | Greek Traveling from place to place, in particular working or based in various places for relatively short periods.

Sprachgefühl [sh-prock-guh-foo-l] Noun | German A person who has the ‘feel’ for a language.

Natsukashii [not-soo-ka-she] Adjective | Japanese A happy recollection of an event or memory in the past, but still missing it. Derived from the verb, natsuku , “to get used to and keep close; to become fond of.” The word used to describe wanting to keep something close, wanting to express fondness for something.

Ukiyo [oh-kee-yo] Adjective | Japanese “The floating world,” is a state of mind emphasizing living in the moment, detached from the difficulties of life.

Wabi-sabi [wah-be-sah-bee] Noun | Japanese In traditional Japanese aesthetics, wabi-sabi is a world view centered on the acceptance of transience and imperfection. Appreciating beauty that is “imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete” in nature.

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Beyond Wanderlust: 30 Words Every Traveler Should Know

By emily petsko | jun 13, 2022, 5:14 pm edt.

smarter word for travel

For those who travel, wanderlust is a familiar feeling. It’s that nagging voice in your head that says, “Yes, you do need to book that flight,” even if your bank account says otherwise. Regardless of how many passport covers this word may adorn, it doesn’t begin to cover the spectrum of emotions and experiences that can be revealed through the act of travel. Here are 30 travel words from around the world to keep in your back pocket as you're exploring this summer.

From the Latin vagari , meaning “to wander,” this 16th-century word originally meant a wandering journey . Nowadays, "vagaries" refer to unpredictable or erratic situations, but that doesn’t mean the old sense of the word can’t be invoked from time to time.

2. Selcouth

An Old English word that refers to something that’s both strange and marvelous . It's a great way to sum up those seemingly indescribable moments spent in an unfamiliar land.

Who hasn’t felt a strong desire to be somewhere—anywhere—other than where you currently are? That’s fernweh , or “ farsickness ," and this German word has been described as a cousin of wanderlust, another German loan word.

4. Dépaysement

Anyone who has traveled abroad will recognize this feeling. The French word refers to the sense of disorientation that often sets in when you step outside your comfort zone, such as when you leave your home country.

Another gift from the French, this word literally translates to “drift,” but thanks to some mid-20th century French philosophers, it can also refer to a spontaneous trip , completely free of plans, in which you let your surroundings guide you.

6. Peregrinate

To peregrinate is to travel from place to place, especially on foot. Its Latin root, peregrinus (meaning “foreign”), is also where the peregrine falcon (literally “ pilgrim falcon ”) gets its name.

7. Perambulate

Similar to peregrinate, this word essentially means to travel over or through an area by foot. So instead of saying that you’ll be walking around London, you can say you’ll be perambulating the city’s streets—much more sophisticated.

8. Numinous

This English word could appropriately be used to describe the Grand Canyon or the Northern Lights. Something numinous is awe-inspiring and mysterious. It's difficult to understand from a rational perspective, which gives it a spiritual or unearthly quality.

9. Peripatetic

The young and the restless will want to incorporate this word into their lexicon. The adjective refers to those who are constantly moving from place to place—in other words, a nomadic existence. It stems from the Greek word peripatein (“to walk up and down”), which was originally associated with Aristotle and the shaded walkways near his school (or, according to legend, his habit of pacing back and forth during lectures).

10. Waldeinsamkeit

You’re alone in a forest. It’s peaceful. The sun is filtering through the trees and there’s a light breeze. That’s waldeinsamkeit . (Literally "forest solitude." And yes, Germans have all the best travel words.)

11. Shinrin-Yoku

In a similar vein, this Japanese word means “ forest bathing ,” and it's considered a form of natural medicine and stress reliever. There are now forest bathing clubs around the world, but you can try it out for yourself on your next camping trip. Take deep breaths, close your eyes, and take in the smells and sounds of the forest. Simple.

12. Solivagant

In those moments when you just want to run away from your responsibilities, you may consider becoming a solivagant : a solo wanderer .

13. Yoko Meshi

This Japanese phrase literally translates to “ a meal eaten sideways ,” which is an apt way to describe the awkwardness of speaking in a foreign language that you haven’t quite mastered, especially over dinner.

14. Resfeber

You just booked your flight. Your heart starts racing. You’re a little nervous about your journey, but mostly you just can’t wait to get going. The anticipation, anxiety, and excitement you get before a big trip is all rolled into one word— resfeber —and you can thank the Swedes for it.

15. Flâneur

Taken from the French flâner , meaning to stroll or saunter , this word describes someone who has no particular plans or place they need to be. They merely stroll around the city at a leisurely pace, taking in the sights and enjoying the day as it unfolds.

16. Gadabout

This could be construed as the traditional English equivalent of flâneur . Likely stemming from the Middle English verb gadden , meaning “to wander without a specific aim or purpose,” a gadabout is one who frequently travels from place to place for the sheer fun of it. In other words: a modern-day backpacker.

17. Hiraeth

Sometimes, no matter how amazing your vacation may be, you just want to come home to your bed and cats. This Welsh word sums up the deep yearning for home that can strike without warning. As Gillian Thomas put it in an interview with the BBC , “Home sickness is too weak. You feel hiraeth , which is a longing of the soul to come home to be safe.”

This Japanese word can be taken to mean “graceful elegance” or “subtle mystery,” but it’s much more than that. It's when the beauty of the universe is felt most profoundly, awakening an emotional response that goes beyond words.

19. Schwellenangst

Translating to “ threshold anxiety ,” this German word sums up the fears that are present before you enter somewhere new—like a theater or an intimidating cafe—and by extension going anywhere unfamiliar. The fear of crossing a threshold is normal, even among the most adventurous of travelers—but it often leads to the most unforgettable experiences.

20. Commuovere

Have you ever seen something so beautiful it made you cry? That’s commuovere in action. The Italian word describes the feeling of being moved, touched, or stirred by something you witness or experience.

This Danish word refers to a warm feeling of contentedness and coziness, as well as the acknowledgment of that feeling. Although not explicitly related to this term, author Kurt Vonnegut summed up the idea behind this concept quite nicely when he said, “I urge you to please notice when you are happy, and exclaim or murmur or think at some point, 'If this isn't nice, I don't know what is.'"

22. Hanyauku

Here's one for those who have a beach trip coming up. Taken from Kwangali, a language spoken in Namibia, hanyauku is the act of tiptoeing across hot sand.

23. Smultronställe

smarter word for travel

This Swedish word translates to something along the lines of “place of wild strawberries,” but its metaphorical meaning is something along the lines of a "happy place." Whether it’s a hidden overlook of the city or your favorite vacation spot that hasn’t been “discovered” yet, smultronställe refers to those semi-secret places you return to time and time again because they’re special and personal to you.

24. Dustsceawung

This Old English word describes what might happen when you visit a place like Pompeii or a ghost town. While reflecting on past civilizations, you realize that everything will eventually turn to dust. A cheery thought.

25. Vacilando

In some Spanish dialects, the word vacilando describes someone who travels with a vague destination in mind but has no real incentive to get there. In other words, the journey is more important than the destination. As John Steinbeck described it in his travelogue Travels With Charley : “It does not mean vacillating at all. If one is vacilando , he is going somewhere, but doesn't greatly care whether or not he gets there, although he has direction. My friend Jack Wagner has often, in Mexico, assumed this state of being. Let us say we wanted to walk in the streets of Mexico city but not at random. We would choose some article almost certain not to exist there and then diligently try to find it.”

26. Lehitkalev

Backpackers and budget travelers, this one is for you: The Hebrew word lehitkalev translates to “dog it” and means to deal with uncomfortable living or travel arrangements.

27. Komorebi

This beautiful Japanese word is a good one to save for a sunny day spent in the woods. Komorebi translates to “sunshine filtering through the leaves.” Does it get any lovelier than that?

This Balinese word refers to something that is simultaneously chaotic and joyful. It isn’t specifically a travel word, but it does seem to fit the feelings that are often awakened by travel.

29. Trouvaille

Translating to a “lucky find,” this French word can be applied to that cool cafe, flower-lined street, or quirky craft store that you stumbled upon by chance. Indeed, these are the moments that make travel worthwhile.

30. Ullassa

Just in case you needed another reason to plan that trip to Yosemite, here's one last word for nature lovers. The Sanskrit word ullassa refers to the feelings of pleasantness that come from observing natural beauty in all its glory.

A version of this story ran in 2018; it has been updated for 2022.

Your Green Grass Project

27 Creative Travel Words That Describe Travel

25 creative Travel Words To Describe How Travel Feels

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Scroll down for 27 of the ultimate creative travel words that perfectly describe travel!

Think back on your travel memories and try to conjure up that travel feeling with words? It’s hard to describe right? How can you explain the feeling of pure awe after waking up at 4am to hike up a mountain and watch a breath-taking sunrise?

Some travel experiences are that good they are almost indescribable. But, we gave it our best shot, here is a list of creative travel related words. 27 of the most powerful travel words to describe how travel feels. Feel free to use any words from the list  in your next inspirational Instagram caption.

A List Of 27 Creative Travel Words

1. hozhoni .

Definition: An American Indian Navajo word meaning a feeling of being filled with beauty and balance. 

Although this is a list of creative travel words in English, there are words included that came from other cultures. Hozhoni describes the feeling that everything is right where it needs to be. This travel related word is exactly how I feel when I’m gazing out at another sunset on a tropical beach. I’m right where I need to be. 

Definition: A beautiful descriptive Arabic-derived word, related to destiny.

Encountering something by chance but it seems like it was meant to be, then it could be kismet , your destiny. Who hasn’t experienced this when traveling, when you meet someone unexpected but connect immediately.

list of creative travel words

3. Numinous

Definition : A word to describe the sense of a supernatural presence around you.

A perfect creative travel word that describes the awe inspiring places that travel takes you to. Like when you’re stargazing in a desert. You just know that there is something out there, watching over us.

4. Clinophilia

Definition: An individual with a passion for beds.

After months of hostel dorms and thin, aged mattresses. I think any backpacker would proclaim a love for good quality, comfortable beds.

Related: 6 Things I Hate About Backpacking

Definition: A short, romantic interlude.

Is there anything more intense than a travel romance? A few short days of utter bliss before you have to say your goodbyes, never to see them again apart from in your memories. 

Definition: Gaia theory is who postulate that the whole biosphere may be alive in that the Earth’s life forms are themselves responsible for regulating the conditions that make. 

I’m obsessed with Gaia theory, that our planet is a breathing organ. I think about it constantly while traveling. How can we not love the beautiful woman that is the Earth and how she creates this creative art in nature? 

other words for travel

Definition: A feeling of homesickness for somewhere you’ve never even visited.

This solemn travel word escapes me to be honest, I’m too busy feeling homesick for the places I’ve already left and may never return to.

Related: Why You Should Quit Your Job And Travel

8. Harbinger

Definition: A person or thing that announces or signals the approach of another.

This travel word originally described a person who provided lodging, later one who went ahead to find lodgings for an army or for a nobleman and his retinue, hence, a herald (mid 16th century). Now, I like to think it gives a creative travel word to that feeling of being on the edge of something great. 

Definition : When you finally realise how big the world is and how small you are in comparison.

Finally, a travel associated word to explain how insignificant we are as backpackers. Pointlessly trying to experience as much as this vast planet as we can, whilst knowing we’ll never achieve our dream. 

10. Neophile

Definition: Not to be confused with necrophilia, a neophile is someone who loves all thnovel experiences.

Anyone who loves travel loves the new. Routine is for non-backpackers while true adventurers crave novel experiences.

Related: My Digital Nomad Story

list of words that describe travel

11. Eudaimonia

Definition: A Greek word meaning a content state of being happy and healthy. 

Every since I became a digital nomad over 3 years ago, even through the hard times I am feeling eudaimonia. 

12. Waldeinsamkeit

Definition: A Germanic word to describe the feeling of being alone in a forest.

Although I dislike being lonely as a long-term backpacker. Sometimes there is nothing better than a solitary hike or stroll through peaceful nature. 

13. Mimeomia

Definition: The frustration of knowing how easily you fit into a stereotype.

This creative travel word is perfect for anyone who’s ever stayed in a hostel or two. Backpackers all over the world unfortunately fit neatly into the stereotype of their home country. Aussies loving Vegemite and British loving their cups of tea. Sigh…

Related: 10 Eco-Friendly Toiletries Every Backpacker Needs

14. Midding

Definition: A perfect travel word to describe the pleasure of observing a social gathering but not actually being in the midst of it.

I love relaxing in a hammock, watching fellow backpackers sharing a beer and chatting about their days. A feeling like no other.

Definition: An infectious enthusiasm.

What’s not to love about meeting positive travelers who possess a zest for life you just don’t see in daily life back home? These kind of Ioer people spark up an excitement for you to get the most out of travel.

16. Mamblory

Definition: The feeling of arriving home whilst you in the midst of traveling. 

As much as travel is amazing, sometimes we all crave that just arrived home feeling. Where everything is familiar and you are surrounded by people who know you. No small talk required. 

17. Gemütlichkeit

Definition : A Germanic word to describe a feeling of natural friendliness.

There’s something about hostels and the people they attract. Hostel-lodgers are a friendly bunch, you’re always guaranteed to make a new mate every day. (Admittedly there are foreign words associated with travel in this list, please forgive!)

list of words associated with travel

18. Heliophilous

Definition: A feeling of being attracted to the sunlight.

Calling all sunseekers! If you’re a cold-blooded human like me, you probably identify as an heliophile.

19. Eleutheromania

Definition: The constant  desire to be free.

This is less a word about travel and more an instinctive human feeling. We were born to be nomads, so return to your instincts and travel.  

20. Morosophy

Definition: A foolish pretence of wisdom

The more I travel, the more I learn how little I know. Travel is eye-opening and teaches you to remain humble and open to new ideas, because, you know nothing.

Related: 25 Best Self-Help Books For Women

Definition: A wild, unplanned adventure where the traveler lets spontaneity decide the path. 

Those days where you don’t have an itinerary to visit 3 churches, 4 castles, hike up a mountain and kayak back down it are often the best kind of days. Travel SHOULD be spontaneous . Let destiny decide. 

22. Gest Or Geste

Definition: 13th century word describing one last adventure

How many times have you heard yourself saying ‘This is my last big trip before I settle down’ and then before you know it, you’re planning one final ‘Gest’! Now, though, at least you have the perfect travel related word to describe your last gest!

23. Theosophy

Definition: An immediate divine illumination.

This travel associated word is for those epiphany moments on travel adventures when the answer to a problem that you left at home, finally comes to you. This happens because travel helps you to get to know who you are, and what you want. 

24. Ilotriophagy

Definition: The craving for strange foods.

Anyone for fried cockroaches from a Thai street stall? Food makes up a massive part of the travel experience. So, this list of travel words had to include a couple words about food.

25. Novaturient

Definition: A beautiful Latin word for when you a desiring a change in your life. 

This is often the reason many of us begin to travel. We want to change our lives to become more authentic to ourselves. An inspirational travel word to use in your next Instagram caption 😉

26. Integrum

Definition: complete in latin.

A travel word to describe something no true traveler ever feels – Complete. Once wanderlust takes hold, you’ll never feel complete again, always yearning for the next adventure. 

27. Saudades

Definition: an ebbing feeling of missing someone..

This is a Portuguese word with no translation in another language. It’s beautiful, it combines longing and missing someone in a pure way. 

Simply, indescribable. Just like travel. 

If you enjoyed this list of creative travel words, make sure you pin it for later! Or have I missed any word that perfectly describes travel? Leave a comment below and let me know.

25 travel words that describe how traveling feels

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Unusual & Creative Travel Words that you must know in 2019

Blogging Tips & SEO

Last Updated on: Apr 11, 2019  

About this blog: This contains 38 unique and creative travel words that you can use in your travel vocabulary. Use them in your travel captions or use them for naming your blog . 

Oh, yes! We love to travel. And we love to get amazed at new experiences. We love to look over in awe at the jaw-dropping scenery before us. At times, words fail. The feeling, the emotions that we encounter after scaling a summit, or after having a scuba diving experience cannot often be described with words. I am sure all of us have these moments when we fall short of words. But there are some beautiful and creative travel words that describe these various feelings very well. Some of these words might not have English equivalents.

As a traveller and writer, I often keep looking for words to describe my feelings. The more I look into these words, the more I fall in love with them. These words have such powerful emotions and feelings! So we decided to share some of our favourite unusual and creative travel words with you.

UNUSUAL AND CREATIVE TRAVEL WORDS

Peregrinate (v.).

Origin: Latin

Definition: To travel or wander around from place to place

travel words with beautiful meanings-peregrinate

The feeling we have whenever we are visiting any new place. We love to wander around and discover the hidden and not so hidden gems. And Darjeeling happens to be one of our favourite places to wander around. What’s yours?

Nemophilist (n.)

Origin: English

Definition: One who is fond of the forest

travel words with beautiful meanings-nemophilist

Serendipity (n.)

Definition: The fact of finding interesting or valuable by chance

travel words with beautiful meaning-serendipity

Trouvaille (n.)

Origin: French

Definition: Something lovely discovered by chance

travel word with beautiful meaning - trouvaille - blog name ideas

These two words are so close to our hearts. That we would be together was destiny, but our meeting was definitely serendipity! We had been travelling together for a long time, but it was only after our Amarnath Yatra , that we truly realized what travel means to us and what we actually want of our life.

Eudaimonia (n.)

Origin: Greek

Definition: The contented happy state when you travel

unusual-travel-words-eudaimonia

Eleutheromania (n.)

Definition: The intense desire for freedom

unusual-travel-words-eleutheromania

These two Greek words so wonderfully summarize our feeling when we travel. Travelling makes us contented and happy.

Sonder (n.)

Origin: Unknown

Definition: The realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own

unusual-travel-words-sonder

Resfeber (n.)

Origin: Swedish

Definition: The tangled feelings of fear and excitement before a journey

unusual-travel-words-resfeber - blog name ideas

This always happens before a journey. There is a perpetual state of excitement as well as nervousness before I start any journey. And I enjoy both the state.

Before our trip to Uzbekistan, I had a bad case of travel anxiety after I read about Airbnb scams. It was only after I found out methods to detect Airbnb scam , I caught a break.

Fernweh (n.)

Origin: German

Definition: An urge to travel even stronger than wanderlust ; farsickness

unusual-travel-words-fernweh-domain-name-ideas

Dérive (n.)

Definition: To drift unplanned, only led by the landscape and architect around you.

unusual-travel-words-dérive

Have you done this? Have you travelled without any fixed plan? Often it is the unexpectedness of a journey that makes it even better. When we went to Majuli , we did not know where we would visit next. It was an impromptu decision to next visit Meghalaya . And this time we decided to give Shillong and Cherrapunji a miss and visit the offbeat places in Meghalaya . It was surely a memorable trip!

Solivagant (adj.)

Definition: Wandering alone. A solitary adventurer who travels and wanders the globe.

unusual-travel-words-solivagant

Strikhedonia (n.)

Definition: The joy of being able to say “to hell with it”

unusual-travel-words-strikhedonia

The feeling we had when we visited Ladakh !

Numinous (n.)

Definition: The powerful, personal feeling of being overwhelmed and inspired

unusual-travel-words-numinous

I had this feeling when I trekked the Rupin Pass summit . It was an overwhelming experience to stand there and look at the Kinner-Kailash range before me.

Forelsket (n.)

Origin: Norwegian

Definition: The euphoria you experience when you are first falling in love

unusual-travel-words-forelsket

This is such a beautiful and creative travel word. The first time we fell in love with each other, it was confusing. But the tangled emotion that I was feeling at that time was probably known as “forelsket”! And I think it is the same feeling when we fall in love with each other after completing every trek or doing something that we never thought we would do.

Hireath (n.)

Origin: Welsh

Definition: A homesickness for a home which you cannot return, a home which maybe never was.

unusual-travel-words-hireath

Sehnsucht (n.)

Definition: A wistful longing and yearning in the heart for travels that have been and travels to come.

unusual-travel-words-sehnsucht

Livsnjutare (n.)

Definition: Someone who loves life deeply and enjoys life

unusual-travel-words-livsnjutare

Sturmfrei (n.)

Definition: The freedom of being alone and having the ability to do whatever you want.

unusual-travel-words-sturmfrei

Sometimes, being alone is the best thing that we can gift ourselves.

Coddiwomple (v.)

Definition: To travel in a purposeful manner towards a vague destination

unusual-travel-words-coddiwomple

Nefelibata (n.)

Origin: Portugese

Definition: One who lives in the cloud of their own imagination; an unconventional person

unusual-travel-words-nefelibata

This word so describes me. I love to live in my own imagination.

Hodophile (adj.)

Definition: A lover of roads. One who loves to travel.

unusual-travel-words-hodophile

Schwellenangst (n.)

Definition: Fear of crossing a threshold to embark on something new.

unusual-travel-words-schwellenangst

Don’t we all have the fear while starting anything new? It might be a new job, or a new life at a different city, or even changing our lifestyle. I was always very complacent with my life with a high paying job. But there was a void somewhere. Even after I knew that I have to take the leap, the fear hold me back. The fear of uncertainty was keeping me back from doing what I loved.

Today, I have crossed that threshold. And let me tell you the joy that it brings is totally worth all the difficulties and problems and hard work that went. What is the fear that is holding you back?

Vagary (v.)

Definition: A wandering or roaming journey

unusual-travel-words-vagary

Saudade (n.)

Definition: A nostalgic longing to be near something or someone who is distant.

unusual-travel-words-saudade

Origin: Danish

Definition: The cosy feeling you get when you are enjoying the good things in life with friends

unusual-travel-words-hygge

Commuovere (v.)

Origin: Italian

Definition: To stir, to touch, to move to tears

unusual-travel-words-commuovere

The feeling we had after completing the Chadar Frozen River Trek .

Origin: Japanese

Definition: A profound and mysterious sense of the beauty of the universe

creative travel words-yūgen

Definition: Awareness of how little of the world you will experience

Travel words with beautiful meaning-onism

These two words sum it all. The universe, the world is so mysteriously beautiful. We can feel and experience only a part of this beauty!

Petrichor (n.)

Definition: The smell of earth after rain

travel words with beautiful meaning -petrichor-domain-name-ideas

Flâuner (n.)

Definition: A person of leisure, deliberately aimless, simply wandering the streets, soaking in the city

travel words with beautiful meaning-flâuner

Whenever we visit any city, we love to walk around. It is the best way to discover the charm of a city. We loved to roam around Yangon and explore the city on foot discovering its gems, hidden or otherwise!

Sometimes Kolkata , our hometown does this to us. We simply wander around, soaking in the little delights, wandering around the lanes and bye lanes and falling in love over and over again with the city. And so does Delhi !

Jijivisha (n.)

Origin: Sanskrit

Definition: The strong eternal desire to live and continue living

creative-travel-words-jijivisha

Rasasvada (n.)

Definition: The taste of bliss in the absence of all thoughts

creative-travel-words-rasasvada

Exactly what we felt after seeing the Everest and Kanchenjunga ranges in front of us from the Phalut. The Sandakphu-Phalut Trek is a great experience.

Smultronställe(n.)

Definition: Lit. “ Place of wild strawberries ”; a special place discovered, treasured, returned to for solace and relaxation; a personal idyll free from stress and sadness.

creative-travel-words-smultronställe

Darjeeling and Sikkim is our “place of wild strawberries”. What is yours?

Querencia (adj.)

Origin: Spanish

Definition: A place where one feels safe, A place where one feels at home

creative-travel-words-querencia

Musafir (n.)

Origin: Urdu

Definition: Traveller

creative-travel-words-musafir

Vuslat (n.)

Origin: Turkish

Definition: A union or reunion after being apart for a long time with one’s beloved

This is one of my favourite creative travel words.

creative-travel-words-vuslat

Thalassophile (n.)

Definition: A lover of ocean

creative-travel-words-thalassophile

Waldeinsamkeit (n.)

Definition: The feeling of being alone in the woods

creative-travel-words-waldeinsamkeit

So did you find your travel inspiration from these beautiful and unusual travel words? What is your favourite? Let us know in comments.

Pin this post for a later dose of inspiration!

unusual travel words with beautiful meanings

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Agni Amrita Travel Blogger

Hey! we’re Agni & Amrita.

We have been travelling together since the last 15 years and writing independent and personal travel content since 2014. Travel is one of the best teachers and through this blog, we aim to share our experiences and travel tips. We encourage you to travel more and see the world through your eyes and not through filtered templates.

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26 Comments

Rishikesh Vinyasa Yoga School

If you love to travel and excited to know different places in world then pack your bag and travel to India. India the birth place of yoga. Good for peace your mind and relaxing body.

Anahita Irani

Brilliant post, some of these descriptive words I read for the first time. Bookmarked for future reference. Thanks for Sharing.

2 Backpackers

Thank you Anahita. Glad that you liked the post.

Sandy N Vyjay

These are indeed words that provide full expression to the meaning of travel. Thanks for adding to my vocabulary. this is indeed the serendipity of reading travel blogs.

Thank you Sandy and Vyjay!

Noor Anand Chawla

This post was such a treat! I love travel and I love words, and it was nice to recognise a few that I knew, and learn new ones that I didn’t!

Thank you so much! So glad that you liked the post.

Sanjay

I am not just inspired but so well educated too now. Y next travel will now be so well-informed.

Thank you Sanjay!

Sundeep

Thanks for sharing this, great to know these word and their meaning. And yes I can say now I am Nemophilist. 🙂

Thank you Sundeep!

Abhinav Singh

That is a very unique topic for a blog. Though I would want to identify myself with all the term, but I find myself closest to be a Nemophilist and Trouvaille. I also identify with Resfeber. No matter how much I have travelled, I still get a little nervous (and excited) before a foreign trip.

Thanks Abhinav. I can understand that nervous and excited feeling before a foreign trip!

pamela

Such words , very useful must say. I love to read and learn new things. These will definitely help me to increase my vocab.

Thank you Pamela!

Gurjeet Chhabra

Woow so many beautiful, unique travel words i am unaware off. Love it

Thank you Gurjeet!

Just_mommying_around

Wow that made for an interesting read. Adding them to my dictionary right away!

Thanks so much.

Sapna Bansal

Thanks for enhancing my vocabulary.. none them was familiar to me so far.

Thank you Sapna! I did not know a few before writing this.

Pallavi

Always admire your writting skills and this time thanks for introducing new words in my dictionary. Great way to increase ones vocabulary with pictures origin and all.

Thank you Pallavi. So glad that you liked the post.

Sandip

Excellent post..very informative!!

Dragana

Amazing list! This should keep me busy for a while. I would like to add French noun Flânerie – Aimless strolling or sauntering without a set plan or defined destination; walking at a leisurely pace, simply observing as you’re being taken along. Sometimes I write about similar topics. Here is an example post I wrote in case you or any of your readers find it interesting. Our content complements each other nicely, perhaps we can collab in some way in the future. Keep up the good work. Can’t wait to see something new from you! Cheers!

Agni Amrita

Thank you so much for the comment and another beautiful word. You blog is amazing too. Maybe we can connect over for a collab in some way. Looking forward.

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I am Aileen

50 Unusual Travel Words with Interesting and Inspiring Meanings

by Aileen Adalid Quotes 46 comments

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Have you ever tried to explain a travel experience or feeling and you found yourself at a loss for words? (Unusual travel words) .

Well much like you, there are events and moments wherein I feel like I couldn’t fully express myself — which is probably why I’ve turned to other languages and unusual travel words to help expand my vocabulary… and yes, to satisfy that gnawing feeling.

The more I started researching and looking up these unique words, the more I fell in love with them because somehow, they could perfectly convey certain feelings and emotions where the English language just doesn’t cut it. Inspired by the success of my popular best travel quotes article, here is my top list of the most unusual words with cool and beautiful meanings!

100 Best Travel Quotes & Captions

Check out these best travel quotes that will help inspire you to travel!

Table of Contents

. Best Unusual Travel Words

Unusual Travel Words: Exulansis

1. Exulansis

The tendency to give up trying to talk about an experience because people are unable to relate to it (Noun / Origin: Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows / exu·lan·sis)

“…whether through envy or pity or simple foreignness, which allows it to drift away from the rest of your life story, until the memory itself feels out of place, almost mythical, wandering restlessly in the fog, no longer even looking for a place to land.”

FYI : In case you don’t know, the ‘Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows’ is written by John Koenig and it has become so famous that he even went on to do a TED show. Basically, the dictionary presents neologisms (up and coming words) for powerful feelings that you likely don’t have a proper term for, and indeed ‘exulansis’ is one of the beautiful unusual travel words that you must know!

Morii

The desire to capture a fleeting moment (Noun / Origin: Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows / mo·rii)

“ With every click of the shutter, you’re trying to press pause on your life. If only so you can feel a little more comfortable moving on living in a world stuck on play.”

I’m sure that we all have felt this, not only when we’re traveling but in all the meaningful moments of our lives! We all have this kind of desire given the fact that cameras together with social media will — and always — be on the rise. After all, we simply don’t want to miss a thing. We just want to capture moments before they slip through our fingers so that we can hopefully relive and relish on it later on. But then again.. it is a constant struggle of balance between ‘capturing’ and being there and savoring those moments.

Unusual Travel Words: Onism

The awareness of how little of the world you’ll experience (Noun / Origin: Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows / o·ni·sm)

“The frustration of being stuck in just one body, that inhabits only one place at a time, which is like standing in front of the departures screen at an airport, flickering over with strange city names like other people’s passwords, each representing one more thing you’ll never get to see before you die.”

ETYMOLOGY : Portmanteau of monism (the philosophical view that a variety of things can be explained in terms of a single reality) + onanism (alternative word for self-pleasure).

Raise your hand if you’ve ever encountered this thought — yep, I knew it, you’ve felt this too! This sentiment is often the reason why I like the idea of immortality… because yes, I am selfish: I would really like to see and experience EVERYTHING. But as it is, I’ll make most of my time — and you should too!

Photophile

4. Photophile

A person who loves photography (Noun / Origin: Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows / pho·to·phile)

This is an obscure word but supposedly, this came about after deriving it off from the word “photophilic” which is an organism that loves or seeks light — which is related in a way to how cameras function.

Unusual Travel Words: Sonder

The realization that each random passerby has a life as vivid and complex as your own (Noun / Origin: Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows / son·der)

“The realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own — populated with their own ambitions, friends, routines, worries and inherited craziness.”

ETYMOLOGY : Related to the German word ‘sonder’ (special) and French ‘sonder’ (to probe). If you ask me, this is one of my favorites on all of these unusual travel words especially because I personally love people-watching when I travel abroad. It’s just simply the kind of realization you gain as you witness more of the world.

Ruckkehrunruhe

6. Rückkehrunruhe

The feeling of returning home after a trip only to find it fading rapidly from your awareness (Noun / Origin: Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows / rück·keh·run·ru·he)

This is exactly why I learned how to create a travel blog as well as build a travel vlog . Both of them help me record the fleeting memories that I’ve had for as much as I could!

Unusual Travel Words: Vemödalen

7. Vemödalen

The frustration of photographing something amazing when thousands of identical photos already exist ( Noun / Origin: Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows / ve·mö·da·len)

“The frustration of photographing something amazing when thousands of identical photos already exist — the same sunset, the same waterfall — which can turn a unique subject into something hollow and pulpy and cheap.”

ETYMOLOGY : From the Swedish word vemod which means “tender sadness, pensive melancholy” and then combined with Vemdalen, the name of a Swedish town. Swedish place names are the source of IKEA’s product names — the original metaphor for this idea was that these clichéd photos are a kind of prefabricated furniture that you happen to have built yourself.

So, I never actually felt this… because though there are tons of ‘duplicates’, I still like to make my own and say that “Ah, I shot this!” . BUT of course, I have a lot of friends — most especially the avid photographers — who go through vemodalen ! Let me know if you also have the same sentiments.

Absquatulate

8. Absquatulate

To flee or leave abruptly without saying goodbye (Noun / Origin: Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows / ve·mö·da·len)

I once reached a point where I just wanted to leave everything and go. I can still vividly recall that memory because it’s how my travel lifestyle started !

Cockaigne

9. Cockaigne

An imaginary place of extreme luxury and ease (Noun / Origin: English / cock·aigne)

This is one of the many uncommon English words and this term is derived from the Middle French phrase pais de cocaigne , which literally means “the land of plenty.”

Coddiwomple

10. Coddiwomple

To travel in a purposeful manner towards a vague destination (Verb / Origin: English / cod·di·wom·ple)

I gotta admit, the first time I saw this word (which was when I was around 15), I honestly thought that it meant cuddling or something of that sort. It’s just such a unique word! When I finally saw the correct definition, I was floored at how deep it was so I just had to put it up in this list of unusual travel words.

Ecophobia

11. Ecophobia

A fear or dislike of one’s home (Noun / Origin: English / e·co·pho·bia)

— and so you leave, to find where home is for you. *wink*

This word is based from Ancient Greek in whick ‘eco’ is derived from oîkos or “house”, and then of course ‘phobia’ from phóbos or “fear”.

Gadabout

12. Gadabout

A person who travels often or to many different places, especially for pleasure (Noun / Origin: English / gad·about)

Tracing back to the Middle English verb ‘gadden’ which means ‘to wander without a specific aim or purpose’. Speaking of, I’m definitely a gadabout as I find pleasure in going on adventures all over the world !

Nemophilist

13. Nemophilist

A person who is fond of forests or forest scenery (Noun / Origin: English / ne·mo·phi·list)

As far as unusual travel words go, I have added yet another term on my arsenal to describe not only my friends but myself as well!

Numinous : Unusual Travel Words

14. Numinous

Feeling both fearful and awed by what is before you. (Adjective / Origin: Latin / nu·​mi·​nous)

This word can mean a lot of things and it especially leans more towards depicting something supernatural or mysterious that is almost as if it’s by some divine power.

You can take this word the way you want it, but the way I see it, this perfectly describes several travel experiences that I have had.

I’m not exactly a spiritual person but I recognize some strong connection to nature and you bet that I felt a numinous presence in amazing places like Antarctica and Iceland . You just gotta be there to experience the emotion yourself!

Selcouth

15. Selcouth

Something unfamiliar, unusual or wondrous (Adjective / Origin: Old English / sel·couth)

This is the perfect adjective to use when defining a place you have traveled to that just feels foreign or novel — which is in itself a good thing and an inevitability.

Serendipity

16. Serendipity

The natural ability of making desirable discoveries by accident (Noun / Origin: English / ser·en·dip·i·ty)

A term in the 1750s to describe those who ‘ were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things they were not in quest of’ . This usually happens to me in moments where I least expect it and it’s such a wonderful thing!

Wayfarer

17. Wayfarer

A person who travels on foot (Noun / Origin: English / way·far·er)

This is from the Middle English word weyfarere which is equivalent to way +‎ farer (‘to journey).

Dérive

Spontaneous journey, led only by the spirit of the landscape (Noun / Origin: French / de·ʁiv)

This is a French word that originally refers to a strategy whereing participants “drop their everyday relations and let themselves be drawn by the attractions of the terrain and the encounters they find there”.

In this list of unusual travel words, don’t you think that this perfectly describes a lot of traveling and digital nomads today?

Flaneur

19. Flâneur

A person of leisure who strolls aimlessly, observing life and society (Noun / Origin: French / flâ·neur)

The flâneur was, in some way, essential to any picture of the streets of Paris . The word carried a set of rich associations: the man of leisure, the idler, the urban explorer, the connoisseur of the street.

Depaysement

20. Dépaysement

The good or bad feeling that comes from being in a foreign country (Noun / Origin: French / de·pɛ·iz·mɑ̃)

This word could literally mean something like: ‘to be uncountried’ and it could either be due to disorientation or gladness — depends on you, and you bet that I’ll be using this word from now on!

Trouvaille

21. Trouvaille

A lucky find (Noun / Origin: French / trü·ˈvī’)

There’s something about the French language that is romantic and melodic, and this has got to be one of my favorite unusual travel words!

Unusual Travel Words:  Acatalepsy

22. Acatalepsy

The impossibility to truly comprehend anything find (Noun / Origin: Greek / acat·​a·​lep·​sy)

This is clearly an overwhelming feeling, but don’t you think that it humbles us in some way? The more I travel, the more I feel a sense of acatalepsy and though it might seem daunting at first, I think that’s just what makes our world and life itself an incredibly beautiful thing.

Novaturient

23. Novaturient

A desire for powerful change in one’s life or situation (Adjective / Origin: Latin / nO·va·’tUr·E·ent)

ETYMOLOGY : The word “nova” originates from the Latin novus meaning ‘new’.

Peregrinate

24. Peregrinate

To travel or wander around from place to place (Adjective / Origin: Latin / per·​e·​gri·​nate·​e·​gri·​nate)

The best way to plan for such an adventure? By checking out these top travel resources and planning tips!

Unusual Travel Words: Solivagant

25. Solivagant

A solitary wanderer (Noun / Origin: Latin / so·liv·a·gant)

ETYMOLOGY : Latin word of solivagus meaning wandering alone + English – ant

Eleutheromania

26. Eleutheromania

An irresistible yearning for freedom (Noun / Greek / el·u·ther·o·man·ea)

ETYMOLOGY : From Ancient Greek ἐλευθερία (eleuthería, ‘freedom’) +‎ -mania.

Hodophile

27. Hodophile

One who loves to travel (Noun / Origin: Greek / hodo·phile)

ETYMOLOGY : From Ancient Greek ὁδός (hodós) which means travel.

Meraki

Putting a part of yourself into what you’re doing (Noun / Origin: Greek / me·ra·ki)

This is a modern Greek word that’s often used to describe the instance wherein you leave a part of yourself (your soul, creativity, or love) in your work — so it’s like when you intensely love to do something or just about anything that you put something of yourself into it.

Unusual Travel Words:  Peripatetic

29. Peripatetic

A person who travels from place to place (Noun / Origin: Greek / peri·pa·tet·ic)

We can trace back the origin of this word to Aristotle and his followers. They often walked around peripatos (covered walk in the Lyceum) while Aristotle does his lectures, given that the former loves walking. As such, the Greek word peripatētikos (from peripatein, meaning “to walk up and down”) came about because of them.

Eudaimonia

30. Eudaimonia

A contented state of being happy, healthy and prosperous (Adjective / Origin: Greek / U·de·‘mOn·E·a)

Leave a comment below if you’ve felt eudaimonia while traveling!

Unusual Travel Words: Fernweh

31. Fernweh

Wanderlust; an ache for distant places or a strong desire to travel (Noun / Origin: German / feirn·veyh)

ETYMOLOGY : From the word fern (“far”) and weh (“pain”). It can be literally translated as farsickness or longing for far-off places.

Unusual Travel Words: Heimweh

32. Heimweh

A longing for home (Noun / Origin: German / heim·veyh)

As contrasted with Fernweh, this is a German word for homesickness.

Kopfkino

33. Kopfkino

The act of playing out an entire scenario in your mind (Noun / Origin: German / kopf·ki·no)

Hard translation is “head cinema” and as the definition goes, these are for those times where you start daydreaming or imagining scenarios about how a situation will unravel.

Schwellenangst

34. Schwellenangst

Fear of crossing a threshold to embark on something new (Noun / Origin: German / shwel·en·ahngst)

ETYMOLOGY : From the German words Schwelle (threshold) + Angst (anxiety).

Sehnsucht

35. Sehnsucht

An intense yearning for something far-off and indefinable (Noun / German / zEn·‘zUkt)

ETYMOLOGY : From German words sehnen (to long) and Sucht (anxiety; sickness; addiction).

The origin of the word doesn’t sound too good but as a whole it simply means that it’s an indescribable yearning for far off places and indescribable goals.

Sprachgefühl

36. Sprachgefühl

A person who has the feel for a language (Noun / Origin: German / shpräḵ-gə-ˌfᵫl)

This literally translates as ‘language feeling’ from compound nouns combining Sprache (language) and Gefühl (feeling). Basically, this does not only refer to a person who has a good understanding of foreign languages but also to a person who has intuitiveness for what is linguistically appropriate.

Sturmfrei

37. Sturmfrei

The freedom of being alone (Noun / Origin: German / shtUrm·frI)

A German word that translates literally to “storm free” — but the real meaning has nothing to do with the weather. As a slang, it means having the house or place to one’s self; but if we put a romantic twist to it then it’s about having the freedom or of having some alone time.

Unusual Travel Words: Vorfreude

38. Vorfreude

The joyful anticipation that comes from imagining future pleasures (Noun / Origin: German / FOR·frI)

ETYMOLOGY : Combination of German words vor (pre) and Freude (happiness). This is one of the rare words that I’ve come to love!

Waldeinsamkeit

39. Waldeinsamkeit

The feeling of solitude in the woods (Adjective / Origin: German / vahyd-ahyn-zahm-kahyt)

ETYMOLOGY : Combination of Wald (forest) and Einsamkeit (loneliness)

Livsnjutare

40. Livsnjutare

A person who loves life deeply and lives it to the extreme (Adjective / Origin: Swedish / lives·noo·tuhreh)

Yet another word discovery that I loved since it’s something that I want to refer to myself as!

Unusual Travel Words: Mangata

41. Mångata

The reflection of the moon on the water (Noun / Origin: Swedish / mo-an-gaa-tah)

ETYMOLOGY : Combination of Swedish words måne (moon) and‎ gata (street, road). If you ask me, this is one of the best aesthetic words!

Resfeber

42. Resfeber

The tangled feelings of fear and excitement before a journey begins (Noun / Origin: Swedish / reece·FEE·ber)

I always experience this, especially when I’m about to board a flight — and it’s not just because I have a fear of flying , but it’s simply because there are just far too many mixed emotions swirling inside me (which is a great and surreal thing!)

Smultronställe

43. Smultronställe

A special place discovered for solace and relaxation (Noun / Origin: Swedish / smUl·tron·’stel·e)

This Swedish word literally translates to “place of wild strawberries” and it’s a place where you feel most at home that’s away from any stress or sadness.

Komorebi

44. Komorebi

The sunlight that filters though the trees (Noun / Origin: Japanese / 木漏れ日 ko·mo·RE·bee)

The Japanese truly have a way of coming up with the most interesting words and this is such a poetic addition to this list of unusual travel words!

Unusual Travel Words: Natsukashii

45. Natsukashii

A happy recollection of an event or memory in the past (Adjective / Origin: Japan / 懐かしい nat·su·ka·shii)

The adjective originally described wanting to keep something close or wanting to express fondness for something. Over time, this term was used more to describe happy reminiscences, leading to the modern meaning. Take note that this is different from a nostalgic longing, but more of joyous remembrance of a past memory.

Shinrin-yoku

46. Shinrin-yoku

Forest bath; a visit to the forest to take in it’s atmosphere (Noun / Origin: Japan / 森林浴 shin·rin·yo·ku)

This is actually a form of nature therapy that is practiced in Japan ever since the 80s.

Ukiyo

“The floating world” — living in the moment, detached from the bothers of life (Noun / Origin: Japan / 浮世 ooh-ki-yo)

A hard translation of this word dates back to Japan’s Edo-period as it describes the urban lifestyle, and a famous related word is ukiyo-e or Japanese art paintings of the ‘Floating World’ or of our fleeting life and transient world.

Yoko Meshi

48. Y oko Meshi

The stress caused by speaking a foreign language (Noun / Origin: Japan / 横飯 yo·ko·me·shi)

Its hard translation is ‘boiled rice’ ( meshi ) and ‘horizontal ( yoko ) which will sort of mean as ‘a meal that’s eaten sideways’ — this metaphor actually refers to the fact that the Japanese write vertically instead of horizontally. Hence, the word yoko-meshi has a nice spin to it, doesn’t it?

Unusual Travel Words: Yugen

A profound, mysterious sense of the beauty of the universe that triggers a deep emotional response (Noun / Origin: Japan / 幽玄 yu·gen)

TRIVIA : Yugen is an important concept in the study of traditional Japanese aesthetics.

Wabi-sabi

50. Wabi-sabi

The discovery of beauty within the imperfections of life (Noun / Origin: Japan / 侘寂 wabe·sabe )

This yet another Japanese aesthetic that has a very deep meaning in which life and art are viewed as beautiful not because they are perfect and eternal but because they are imperfect and fleeting. Isn’t this truly one of the best unusual travel words with a beautiful meaning?

. Bonus Unusual Words

Unusual Travel Words: Ballagàrraidh

Ballagàrraidh

The awareness that you are not at home in the wilderneess (Noun / Origin: Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows / bal·la·ga·rye)

ETYMOLOGY : From Gaelic balla gàrraidh , “garden wall”

This is a word with a very deep meaning — so don’t let that simple definition fool you. To better understand it, I implore you to watch this video .

In fact, I gotta say that this is one of the unusual travel words that I often always feel most especially when I’m doing nature trips . Of course, there have been times when I’ve felt the opposite, but it’s more common to feel and be aware of how highly domesticated we all are. It’s not an entirely bad thing because advancement is a blessing; however, sometimes, it just makes you think how the olden times were truly far simpler and pristine. * sigh * I can’t really put it into words well, but let me know your thoughts once you get to watch the video above!

Des Vu

The awareness that this will become a memory (Noun / Origin: Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows)

ETYMOLOGY : From the French word dès vu, “seen as soon as” or “seen from this point forward”

“ Once in a while you look up, and watch as the present turns into a memory, as if some future you is already looking back on it. “

Unusual Travel Words: Hygge

A feeling of warmth and cosiness as you enjoy life’s simple pleasures (Noun / Origin: Danish / hoo·gah)

This is a well-loved word in Denmark with Norwegian origins and you can even basically call it a way of life and it’s basically all about creating a warm atmosphere with other people.

Commuovere

To stir, to touch, to move to tears (Verb / Origin: Italian / ko’mːwɔvere)

Hiraeth

A homesickness for a place which you can’t return to or never was (Noun / Origin: Welsh / HEER-eyeth)

This is a Welsh concept of longing for home — but more than just missing something, it implies the meaning of having a bittersweet memory of missing a time, era or person.

Thalassophile

Thalassophile

Someone who loves the sea (Adjective / Origin: Greek / THəˈlasəˌfīl)

From the Greek words θάλασσα / thalasso- (sea) and -phile.

Top Unusual Travel Words

I hope you enjoyed discovering these unusual travel words — as much as I had a lot of fun discovering them too!

I’m sure there are still a lot of other unique words out there that could perfectly capture an emotion that we can’t easily express with our own language; so if you have something in mind that’s not already listed here, do let me know in the comments section below!

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How I Afford to Travel the World (Vlog)

Hey there! I am Aileen Adalid. At 21, I quit my corporate job in the Philippines to pursue my dreams. Today, I am a successful  digital nomad  (online entrepreneur, travel writer, & vlogger) living a sustainable travel lifestyle.

My mission?  To show you how it is absolutely possible to  create a life of travel no matter the odds — and I will help you achieve that through my detailed travel hacks, guides, resources, tips, and MORE!

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How to start a successful blog, 46 comments.

Pardis

I really really enjoyed this ! And esp the way it was presented. I am crazy about words. Yhanks. Pardis Kavousi

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Intrepid Travel Blog

29 travel words that describe travel better than you ever thought possible

Travellers in Bolivia

We love travelling and we love words, so imagine our surprise when we came across a massive treasure trove of travel words that describe how we feel before, during and after we travel better than anything we’ve ever seen, ever. In the history of everything.

These literary gems make ‘wanderlust’ look like an overrated show pony. Which it is. Travel brochures of the future will be littered with the likes of resfeber, eudaimonia and fernweh. At least, they will if we have anything to do with it.

TAKE IT AWAY, WORDS!

1. Trouvaille (n.)

Origin: French

Something lovely discovered by chance, like stumbling on a waterfall in Costa Rica .

2. Dérive (n.)

Origin: Latin/French

Lit. “drift”; a spontaneous journey where the traveller leaves their life behind for a time to let the spirit of the landscape and architecture attract and move them.

Girl on the Quarry Trail in Peru

Dériving along the Quarry Trail. Photo by Stephen Parry.

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3. Numinous (adj.)

Origin: Latin

Describing an experience that makes you fearful yet fascinated, awed yet attracted; the powerful, personal feeling of being overwhelmed and inspired. For example, you may have a numinous experience at Yosemite National Park , gazing up in wonder at El Capitan, or at a towering black bear.

4. Cockaigne (n.)

Origin: French, medieval trope

An imaginary land of luxury and idleness. Think House Tyrell of Highgarden, minus the poisoning.

5. Schwellenangst (n.)

Origin: German

Fear of embarking on something new; fear of crossing a threshold. But you know what? You should totally just go with it, and cross that threshold.

A man backflips off a sand dune

Getting all Strikhedonia in Jordan. Photo by tegan & nathan.

6. Strikhedonia (n.)

Origin: Greek

The pleasure of being able to say “to hell with it”. Try it now. Head to our North America page  and shriek ‘Strikhedonia’ immediately before booking a trip.

7. Resfeber (n.)

Origin: Swedish

The restless race of the traveller’s heart before the journey begins when anxiety and anticipation are tangled together; a ‘travel fever’ that can manifest as an illness. The only cure is another grand adventure.

8. Vagary (n.)

An unpredictable instance, a wandering journey; a whimsical, wild or unusual idea, desire, or action.

ESCAPE THE VAGARIES OF LIFE ON, SAY, A SMALL GROUP ADVENTURE IN AFRICA

Girl walks through shrine in Japan.

Embracing eudaimonia in Japan. Photo by Stephen Parry.

9. Eudaimonia (n.)

Lit. “human flourishing”; a contented state of being happy, healthy and prosperous. For example, you are pretty much guaranteed to experience eudaimonia as you watch the sun rise above the ocean in Playa del Carmen .

10. Quaquaversal (adj.)

Moving or happening in every direction instantaneously. It’s a little like when you think your passport’s in your sock drawer but it’s not and your flight’s leaving in three hours.

11. Novaturient (adj.)

Desiring or seeking powerful change in one’s life, behaviour, or situation.

Young travellers in the jungle.

Happily quaquaversal in Guatemala. Photo by Nathan Landers.

12. Sehnsucht (n.)

“The inconsolable longing in the human heart for we know now what”; a yearning for a far, familiar, non-earthly land one can identify as one’s home.

13. Ecophobia (n.)

Origin: English

A fear or dislike of one’s home.

14. Eleutheromania (n.)

An intense and irresistible desire for freedom. Pretty much describes every picture of the Greek Islands  we’ve ever seen.

Trevi Fountain

Livsnjutare in Italy. Photo by The Common Wanderer

15. Livsnjutare (n.)

One who loves life deeply and lives it to the extreme.

16. Solivagant (adj.)

Wandering alone. Although we think it’s better when you’re solivagant with a small group of other solivagant types.

17. Saudade (n.)

Origin: Portuguese

A nostalgic longing to be near again to something or someone that is distant or that has been loved and then lost; “the love that remains”. For example, I have a nostalgic longing for Turkish Delight right now.

Girl at night market

Having eunoia in Vietnam. Photo by Damien Raggatt.

18. Eunoia (n.)

Beautiful thinking; a good mind. My love of Turkish Delight proves I have eunoia (or does it?).

19. Sturmfrei (adj.)

Origin: Germany

Lit. “stormfree”; the freedom of not being watched by a parent or superior; being alone at a place and having the ability to do what you want. Like eating 18 waffles in a day in Belgium .

20. Yoko meshi (n.)

Origin: Japan

The peculiar stress of speaking a foreign language (literally means ‘a meal eaten sideways’). If you’ve ever tried to order ramen in one of Tokyo’s  laneway bars, you’ll know exactly what this means.

Two people in bright clothes

Selcouth outfits in the Sacred Valley. Photo by Stephen Parry.

21. Selcouth (adj.)

Unfamiliar, rare, strange, and yet marvellous, like adding cheese to your coffee in Colombia .

22. Fernweh (n.)

An ache for distance places; the craving for travel; the opposite of homesickness. Also one of Instagram’s most popular hashtags.

23. Yūgen (n.)

An awareness of the universe that triggers emotional responses too deep and mysterious for words.

Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe

It’s hard not to feel yūgen in a place like this. Photo by Damien Raggatt.

24. Commuovere (v.)

Origin: Italy

Only in Italy  would you find such a sensual word meaning to stir, to touch, to move to tears. Possibly while eating a giant slice of thin-crust pizza.

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25. Peregrinate (v.)

To wander from place to place. AKA travel. It’s the very definition. Think of a falcon and BE THE FALCON by embracing its love of flying immediately.

26. Nemophilist (n.)

One who is fond of forests; a haunter of the woods. Not like a spooky ghost; more like a guy with a top-knot who enjoys spending his weekends writing poetry under an old oak tree and drinking black coffee from a vintage thermos.

Girl standing on a rock

Peripatetic over a rock. photo by Phoebe Escott-Kenny.

27. Peripatetic (n.)

A person who spends his or her time wandering. There’s nothing pathetic about being peripatetic – we embrace the wanderers wholeheartedly.

GET PERIPATETIC IN THE MIDDLE EAST. EXPLORE OUR RANGE OF ADVENTURES NOW

28. Hireath (n.)

Origin: Welsh

A homesickness for a home that you can’t return to, a home that perhaps never was. Which is kind of a downer, but a good excuse to keep travelling.

29. Gadabout (n.)

A person who travels often, and for pleasure. Something we should all aspire to, right? Be professional gadabouters? Update your LinkedIn profiles now, gang.

Now you’ve got the lingo, USE IT! Impress your friends with your newfound vocabulary on a small group adventure with Intrepid .

Feeling inspired?

smarter word for travel

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Synonyms of travel

  • as in to trek
  • as in to traverse
  • as in to fly
  • as in to associate
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Thesaurus Definition of travel

 (Entry 1 of 2)

Synonyms & Similar Words

  • peregrinate
  • road - trip
  • knock (about)
  • perambulate
  • pass (over)
  • cut (across)
  • proceed (along)
  • get a move on
  • make tracks
  • shake a leg
  • hotfoot (it)
  • fast - forward

Antonyms & Near Antonyms

  • hang (around or out)
  • slow (down or up)
  • collaborate
  • take up with
  • keep company (with)
  • rub shoulders (with)
  • fall in with
  • pal (around)
  • rub elbows (with)
  • mess around
  • be friends with
  • interrelate
  • confederate
  • cold - shoulder

Thesaurus Definition of travel  (Entry 2 of 2)

  • peregrination
  • commutation

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Thesaurus Entries Near travel

Cite this entry.

“Travel.” Merriam-Webster.com Thesaurus , Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/thesaurus/travel. Accessed 26 May. 2024.

More from Merriam-Webster on travel

Nglish: Translation of travel for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of travel for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about travel

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22 KEY Travel Phrases That Will Transform Your Travels [Free Guide]

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Speak the local lingo and transform your travels with this comprehensive travel phrase guide in 22 languages from around the globe!

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You’ll be treated like an insider, not a tourist when you impress the locals with your knowledge of their language. You don’t need to be fluent in a language to have meaningful interactions with the locals and create memories that will last a lifetime, but you can be fluent for travel .

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noun as in journey

Strongest matches

  • sightseeing

Strong matches

  • commutation
  • peregrination

Weak matches

  • globetrotting

verb as in journey on a trip or tour

  • cover ground
  • get through
  • go into orbit
  • knock around
  • make a journey
  • make one's way
  • take a boat
  • take a plane
  • take a train
  • take a trip

Discover More

Example sentences.

You just travel light with carry-on luggage, go to cities that you love, and get to hang out with all your friends.

He did travel to China and Australia while the story was unfolding.

In doing so he exposed the failure of other airlines in the region to see the huge pent-up demand for cheap travel.

“The tribe is really made of people who put travel as a priority in their entire lifestyle,” says Evita.

Brands like Lo & Sons and Delsey are already tapping Travel Noire to connect with black travelers.

One thing was certain: Grandfather Mole could travel much faster through the water than he could underground.

The mothers know better than any one else how hard a way the little girl will have to travel through life.

He could lie in bed and string himself tales of travel and adventure while Harry was downstairs.

Under ordinary circumstances these men can travel with their burden from twenty to thirty miles a day.

The rules regulating travel on highways in this country are called, "the law of the road."

Related Words

Words related to travel are not direct synonyms, but are associated with the word travel . Browse related words to learn more about word associations.

verb as in tour

verb as in flow

  • mill around
  • move around

noun as in systems of information exchange

  • information technology
  • public relations
  • telecommunications

verb as in make good time

  • make headway
  • make strides

verb as in sail

  • keep steady pace
  • push off/push on
  • wander about

Viewing 5 / 93 related words

On this page you'll find 177 synonyms, antonyms, and words related to travel, such as: driving, excursion, flying, movement, navigation, and ride.

From Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

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20 of the Most Beautiful Travel Words and their Unique Greek Origins

Travel Words with Greek Origin

Beautiful travel words of Greek origin inspire and give meaning to all types of travel experiences.

By knowing about these Greek-related travel words, you will, in effect, gain a greater insight into the world of travel, especially when visiting Greece.

All of these beautiful travel words have something special about them.

It could be how a word sounds, the feelings, and wanderlust they inspire, the beautiful images they bring to mind, or some special uniqueness that makes them memorable.

The Most Beautiful Travel Words of Greek Origin

One thing is for sure, this list of the most beautiful travel words with unique Greek origins will expand your vocabulary—which is always a good thing.

I’ve also included another list of travel words at the end of this list (after the 20 most beautiful travel words) that didn’t make it into the top twenty.

The reason for doing this is so you can fully appreciate all the Greek-related travel words I considered for inclusion in this list of beautiful travel words.

It wasn’t easy to settle on these twenty best travel words of Greek origin, but I’m happy enough with the result.

Have a look and see what you think.

1. Aegean Sea – Travel Words

Origin: Greek

A beautiful word that brings to mind a few of the most beautiful Greek Islands , including Santorini, Mykonos, and Crete—to name a few.

Travel Words Greece Aegean Sea

“Happy is the man, I thought, who, before dying, has the fortune to sail the Aegean sea.” – Nikos Kazantzakis.

According to Greek Mythology, the Aegean Sea owes its name to an ancient King of Athens, Aigeas (Aegeas).

Aegeas was the father of the famous Greek hero, Theseus, who slew the Minotaur on the island of Crete.

When returning to Athens, Theseus sailed back to Athens with black sails after forgetting to change the ship’s sails to white ones.

As a result, his father thought it meant that his son hadn’t survived the ordeal. The fateful error led to the King’s tragic death since he decided to end his life by jumping into the sea.

Eventually, the surrounding sea would become known as the Aegean Sea.

Aegean Airlines also took its name from the same source.

The word Athens immediately conjures up beautiful images of The Parthenon.

Most overseas travelers first arrive by plane to Athens when they vacation in Greece.

Travel Words Athens

The city received its name from the Goddess Athena.

In Greek Mythology, Athena and Poseidon had a contest to see who would become the patron of the Greek city.

Athena gifted the people the olive tree, while Poseidon made a spring gush forth from rocks.

Athena’s gift was deemed the best of the two by the people, so the city was named in her honor.

I had to include this word as one of the most beautiful travel words of Greek origin.

Athena, the Goddess of wisdom, is also beautiful, as proven by the famous beauty contest between Aphrodite, Athena, and Hera.

It wouldn’t have been smart on my part not to have included Athens in a list of the most beautiful travel words.

An atlas is a collection or book of maps, but it’s also an airline company.

Travel Words Atlas Plane

According to Greek legend, Atlas was a Titan condemned to carry the heavens upon his shoulders.

The Titan Atlas is the reason why we can all travel around and explore the world.

4. Eleutheromania

Have you ever felt the intense desire for freedom? Well, the word for this feeling is Eleutheromania.

Eleutheromania Greek Word

It’s similar to the feeling of wanderlust in different languages. Travel is one way that makes people feel free, and eleutheromania is the desire for that feeling.

It comes from Ancient Greek ἐλευθερία (eleuthería, ‘freedom’) plus‎ -mania.

It’s another word for Paradise!

Travel Words Elysian

Greek Mythology deemed the Elysian Fields as being a heavenly resting place after death.

It was seen as the go-to-place in the afterlife. Sadly not everyone was allowed entry into Olympus, the home of the Gods.

One of France’s main streets is named after this heavenly abode, the Champs-Élysees in Paris.

The street is famous for connecting the Arc de Triomphe with the Place de la Concorde. Many consider it to be one of the world’s most famous commercial streets.

Elysian has to be one of the most beautiful travel words because everyone wants to end up in paradise one day. At least you can visit it in Paris.

6. Eudaimonia 

It’s that happy feeling you get when you travel.

Eudaimonia Travel Words

Feeling great when traveling, then the Greek word that describes it is eudaimonia.

It comes from Greek philosophy that has been translated as meaning happiness or well-being.

It has to be one of the biggest reasons why many people love traveling and exploring new places.

Europe is where it’s all at. You have Greece, Italy, and so many other great countries to visit.

Travel Words Europe

It all started with Europa, the mythological princess who ended up being seduced by Zeus.

Zeus took her to the island of Crete across the ocean after the princess sat on his back while he was disguised in the form of a beautiful white bull.

At the time, she had no idea that it was really Zeus, the king of the Gods.

No one could have foreseen that Europa would bestow her name to a group of countries that would one day be known as Europe.

It has become one of the most sought out travel destinations globally, and it all started with a weird sea voyage of her own.

You have the world, and then you have the Galaxy.

Travel Words Galaxy

It all started with the Milky Way, which is based on the Greek myth of Heracles, who, as a child, spilled some milk.

The word is derived from the Greek galaxias (kuklos) ‘milky (vault)’, from gala, galakt- ‘milk.’

I thought about it carefully, but I couldn’t leave Greece out from this list of beautiful travel words.

Greece is where many tourists dream of visiting, especially during the Greek summer.

Greece Travel Words

Aristotle used the term “Graiko” as the name for the first inhabitants of the region.

It was later adopted by the Romans and turned into “Graecus,” a Latin word, to describe the people on the land now known as Greece.

10. Greek Islands

If there is one word better than Greece, then it would have to be the Greek Islands.

Travel Words Greek Islands

Santorini and Mykonos come to mind immediately when thinking about the Greek Islands.

With 227 inhabited Greek Islands to explore, and the rest, which number from 1200 to 6000 depending on the minimum size you consider, there’s something for everyone.

Once you’ve visited one of the best Greek Islands, you’ll be hooked forever.

11. Halcyon

The English word “halcyon ” describes an idyllically peaceful and perfect time that occurred in the past.

Halcyon Travel Words

Halcyon means “kingfisher” in Greek.

A halcyon was a legendary bird in Greek Mythology that made its nest on the Aegean Sea. As the daughter of Aeolus, the god of winds, the bird possessed the power to calm the rough winds and waves.

The name of the God of travel deserves a place in the most beautiful Greek travel words for obvious reasons.

Travel Words Hermes

In Greek ἕρμα (herma) means “cairn, a pile of stones, boundary marker.”

13. Hodophile 

If you love to travel, you can consider yourself a Hodophile.

Hodophile one who loves to travel

A lover of roads, one who loves to travel.

This word is derived from Ancient Greek ὁδός (hodós), which means travel.

How can a relatively unknown Greek Island be one of the most beautiful travel words?

Well, it’s all due to one of the most beautiful and famous travel poems of all time.

Travel Words Ithaca Island

Ithaka Poem

As you set out for Ithaka hope your road is a long one, full of adventure, full of discovery. …

15. Odyssey

In ancient Greek times, the most famous journey would have to be the one described in Homer’s epic poem “The Odyssey.”

Travel Words Odyssey

It took the Greek hero Odysseus ten years to return home after the Trojan War had finished.

16. Peripatetic

Someone who wanders from place to place, living a nomadic existence.

Greek Travel Word

This word is traced back to the time of Aristotle and his followers. The philosophers often walked around peripatos (covered walk in the Lyceum) where Aristotle held his lectures.

It comes from the Greek word peripatētikos. From peripatein, meaning “to walk up and down.”

17. Santorini

Beautiful images of Santorini are often used in advertising and tourist brochures to get you thinking about taking a trip to Greece.

Travel Words Santorini

Ok, so it’s not a Greek word, but the island is in Greece, and it’s the most beautiful Greek Island in my opinion, so here it has to be.

18. Strikhedonia

If you ever felt like saying to hell with it, then you may be surprised to know that there’s actually a word for it. That word is strikhedonia.

Strikhedonia Greek origin word

It’s a popular Greek word associated with travel! That’s because many travelers and bloggers have done such a thing. To hell with it! I’ll quit my job and go traveling.

Obviously had to come from the Greeks.

19. Thalassophile 

For all of you beach lovers out there, this is what you are, a Thalassophile.

Thalassophile Travel Word Greek Origin

Derived from the Greek words θάλασσα / thalasso (sea), and -phile, from Greek philos ‘loving’.

20. Xenophilia

Someone who is attracted to foreign peoples, foreign cultures, manners, and/or customs.

Xenophilia

It’s the reason why so many of us pack our bags to go traveling. Foreign things make travel experiences so much more interesting.

This unique travel word comes from the Greek “xenos,” meaning “stranger, unknown, foreign,” and “philia,” defined as “attraction or love.”

The beauty of this word is that it has the opposite meaning of being a Xenophobe.

Xenophobe describes a person that dislikes or is prejudice against people from other countries. No one wants to be known as a Xenophobe.

For this reason, I include Xenophilia as one of the most beautiful travel words.

Travel Words with Greek Origins that missed out

Acatalepsy – the idea that it is impossible to understand anything, which includes travel experiences.

Airplane (Aeroplane) – from the Greek ἀήρ (aēr), “air” and either Latin planus, “level,” or Greek πλάνος (planos), “wandering”.

Anemoia – a nostalgic sense of longing for a past you yourself have never lived. Maybe you were born in the wrong time period, or maybe you love something about a certain decade in time, like the music.

Aragma – The act of chilling. When the Greeks say ‘pame gia aragma spiti sou, ‘it means ‘let’s go chill at your place.’

Cosmopolitan – can be traced back to Pythagoras, who first used the Greek word kosmos to describe the order of the universe.

Erotic – from Eros, the Greek God of desire.

Eunoia – beautiful thinking.

Iris – Goddess of the rainbow.

Meraki – putting a part of yourself (your soul) into what you’re doing with complete focus and love.

Museum – from the nine Muses who presided over the arts and sciences.

Music – literally means the art of the Muses.

Nemophilist – lover of the woods.

Peratzatha – people-watching.

Philoxenia (Filoxenia) – literally translated as “friend to the stranger” / hospitality.

Taxidi – the Greek word for trip or journey.

I’m sure you would have learned a new word or two for this extensive list of beautiful travel words.

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Beautiful Travel Words Greek Origins

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73+ Essential Travel Phrases and Words You Should Know

The most essential travel phrases and travel words you should learn before travelling abroad. Basic travel phrases for ordering food, useful travel phrases for greetings, basic travel phrases for going around, numbers, emergency phrases and more. Learn how to say Hello in French and thank you in Italian. | Travel | Travel tip | Language learning | foreign language | travel word #travel #paris #traveltips #summerbucketlist #packingideas #hello #gracias

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How do you say “ You have a nice smile ” in Samoan? How to say “ You have beautiful eyes ” in Fijian? Those might not be the essential travel phrases , like Hello or Thank you. But we can all agree that (mis)communication is part of traveling. And language barriers are real. That is why I always find it extremely useful to learn words and phrases in the language of a country I am visiting. Why? It shows respect. People will be nicer to you. A new language will enhance local experiences and understanding of the culture . IT will make traveling easier and it is a great way to make new friends. So what are those common travel phrases ?

🔢 If you have been wondering “In how many languages does Anja know how to count to 10?”, you will find the answer hidden in the blog.

anja on Adventure

Traveling to 40+ countries I’ve learned that only knowing Slovenian will not help me. Shocking right! I was also wrong to assume that everyone speaks English . Knowing KiSwahili gave me a better starting point when bargaining for the prices in Zanzibar . Knowing essential phrases in French helped me in Vanuatu , and knowing how to ask for directions helped me in Japan . And learning Samoan and Fiji helped me when buying fruits in local markets. So next time, when planning your trip, don’t just search for the best things to do in Zanzibar, Japan itinerary , or about Dubai hotels . You should also learn useful phrases for traveling. What are those phrases? Let’s have a look at some useful phrases for traveling .

for ESSENTIAL TRAVEL PHRASES: • 73+ Essential ENGLISH Travel Phrases and Words You Should Know • 73+ Essential ARABIC Travel Phrases for Tourists in Arab Countries & Free PDF • 73+ Essential GREEK Travel Phrases for Tourists on a Greek Holiday & Download • 73+ Essential JAPANESE Travel Phrases for Tourists Visiting Japan & Free cheat sheet • 73+ Essential SLOVENIAN Travel Phrases for your trip to Slovenia & Free Download • 73+ Essential SWAHILI Travel Phrases for Travelers to East Africa + Free Download for WORDS & PHRASES in 101 different languages: • How to say You have beautiful eyes in 101 different languages • How to say What is the WiFi password in 101 different languages • How to say Hello in 101 different languages spoken around the World • How to say Love in 101 different languages spoken around the World • How to say I love you in 101 different languages spoken around the World • How to say Thank you in 101 different languages spoken around the World • How to say Happy Birthday in 101 different languages spoken In the World • How to say Happy New Year in 101 different languages spoken around the World • How to say Friend in 101 different languages spoken around the World with Pronunciation

and ALSO READ: • WHAT IS THE BEST TIME OF DAY TO VISIT HORSESHOE BEND • HOW TO SPEND A HALF DAY AT GRAND CANYON SOUTH RIM • WHICH GRAND CANYON HELICOPTER TOUR IS THE BEST FIT FOR YOU • WHERE TO STAY NEAR ANTELOPE CANYON: THE BEST 10 PICKS • 10 BEST PLACES TO STAY NEAR HORSESHOE BEND YOU WILL LOVE • HOW TO GET FROM LAS VEGAS TO GRAND CANYON BY CAR – FANTASTIC ROAD TRIP GUIDE • BEST PLACES TO STAY NEAR GRAND CANYON SOUTH RIM – 31 AWESOME AND UNIQUE HOTELS

Table of Contents

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smarter word for travel

1. What are Travel Phrases?

Travel phrases are useful phrases to know when traveling abroad. They are a collection of the most common and frequently used words and expressions we use when visiting foreign countries.  From basic greetings to phrases for seeking directions , ordering food , and engaging in cultural exchanges. From a simple ‘’hello’’ and ‘’thank you’’ to longer phrases like ‘’where is the bathroom” and “what is the WiFi password”. Travel phrases equip you with the confidence and ability to connect with locals , by speaking their language , and immerse yourself in authentic experiences .

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The most essential travel phrases and travel words you should learn before travelling abroad. Basic travel phrases for ordering food, useful travel phrases for greetings, basic travel phrases for going around, numbers, emergency phrases and more. Learn how to say Hello in French and thank you in Italian. | Travel | Travel tip | Language learning | foreign language | travel word #travel #paris #traveltips #summerbucketlist #packingideas #hello #gracias

2. How to learn short Travel Phrases and Travel Terms

Before we find out what those useful travel phrases are, let’s talk about how to learn them . It might seem daunting but it is actually fun. The reality is, if you will be traveling for at least a couple of days, you will pick up the basic words while abroad . And if you will be spending some time with locals, they will teach you the bad words first anyway. Which you will remember the fastest. 🙂 Now, depending on your destination country, some travel words and phrases will be easier for you to remember than others. People who know these things say that a person can memorize 50 new words per day . My humble estimation would be 10 . This would potentially mean, you can learn all the essential travel phrases in a day or two . I am a realistic optimist and would say to start learning sooner. Like a week before or more.

2.1. Duolingo

I love using Duolingo . It is a free app, where you choose how many minutes you can invest in learning a language and the purpose of your learning (travel). You can choose from more than 30+ languages and I love that lessons are bite-sized . Currently learning Italian for my Tuscany trip but love Polynesian languages – like Hawaiian and Samoan. Duolingo makes learning a language easy . It uses text, speech and is showing cards. So you can hear the pronunciation, see how the word is written and the translation of it plus a visual representation of the words. A great way to learn no matter where you are. Language: Italian, Hawaiian, Swahili  (40+ languages) Download: iOS | Android | Website Price: Free & In App purchases

There are other apps, that have a free trial and then offer paid memberships. Among those, I tried and loved Babbel and Innovative languages . When I was using those two, I was more invested in actually learning the language and not just common travel phrases. Feel free to test out a few and find which one works best for your learning style.

Pinning is winning and sharing is caring! What are you choosing?

smarter word for travel

3. Essential travel phrases

3.1. basic travel phrases.

Those travelling words in English combine expressions that showcase politeness and cultural respect, encouraging positive interactions with locals and serving as a basis for every communication.

  • I don’t understand
  • Do you speak [language]?
  • What is the WiFi password?
  • Could you take my picture?
  • Where is the bathroom?

ALSO READ: • How to say What is the WiFi password in 101 different languages

3.2. Common travel phrases for greetings and introductions

Below you will find what are some basic greetings tourists should know. Travel greetings lay the foundation for any interaction, allowing you to initiate conversations and make a positive first impression.

  • Good morning
  • Good evening
  • Nice to meet you
  • How are you?
  • My name is …
  • How do you say […] in [language]?
  • Speak slowly, please

3.3. Essential travel phrases for directions and getting around

Basic phrases for asking for directions will enable you to navigate unfamiliar streets and find your way around.

  • What time is …
  • How do I get to …
  • How far away is …
  • Do you have a map?
  • When does the next … arrive?
  • How long does it take to get to….?
  • Spatial demonstratives: here / there
  • Cardinal Directions: North / South / East / West
  • Directions: left / right / straight / back / up / down
  • Mode of transport: car / bus / train / taxi / metro / plane
  • Buildings and places: bathroom / restaurant / hotel / bank / pharmacy / hospital

ALSO READ: • 73+ Essential Greek Travel Phrases for Tourists on a Greek Holiday

3.4. Useful phrases for traveling when ordering food and drinks

Useful phrases when travelling for ordering meals, asking for recommendations, and specifying dietary preferences ensure enjoyable dining experiences and help you explore local cuisines.

  • I’m allergic to …
  • The bill, please.
  • I would like to have …
  • May I see the menu?
  • What are the specials? 
  • What do you recommend?
  • Types of diets: Vegetarian / vegan / gluten free
  • Food flavors: sweet / bitter / sour / salty / spicy
  • Drinks: coffee / tea / water / juice / wine / beer
  • Food allergens: milk / eggs / fish / peanuts / shellfish / wheat / soybeans

smarter word for travel

3.5. Practical travel terms for shopping

Essential phrases for inquiring about prices, negotiating, and asking for sizes or colors are handy when exploring markets and boutiques.

  • Could I try this on?
  • Do you have this in …
  • Excuse me, I’m looking for… 
  • Is this on sale?
  • When do you open/close? 
  • Do you accept credit cards?
  • Size: bigger / smaller
  • Numbers: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10
  • Larger numbers: 50 / 100 / 1000
  • Colors: white / yellow / orange/ red / blue / green / pink / purple / grey / brown / black

🔢 “In how many languages does Anja know how to count to 10?” right now probably in around 7 or 8, but when living abroad this number was between 13-15 languages.

ALSO READ: • 73+ Essential Japanese Travel Phrases for Tourists Visiting Japan

3.6. Useful phrases for travelling when checking in a hotel

Phrases you will need when checking in a hotel, asking for towels, fixing air conditioning, enquiring what time is breakfast, and what is included in your room rate.

  • … is not working.
  • Do you have WiFi?
  • Can I drink the tap water?
  • Meals: breakfast / lunch / dinner
  • Essentials: toilet paper / key / towel
  • Amenities: air conditioning / fan / heater / hairdryer

3.7. Helpful travel terms in case of emergencies

Here you will find helpful important phrases to know when traveling in case of emergencies, natural disasters or if you will be needing assistance in difficult or dangerous situations.

  • There is a …
  • Please call the …
  • I lost my passport
  • My money was stolen
  • Natural hazards: fire / flood / earthquake
  • First responders: police / firemen / ambulance

3.8. Beyond essential travel phrases to compliment someone

If you’re like me and really love learning a few phrases in new languages, expand your study beyond the essential travel phrases. I always learn how to say please and thank you, never visit without knowing the local word for “coffee” and never leave without knowing how to say;

  • You have beautiful eyes
  • You have a beautiful smile

smarter word for travel

4. Best language Apps for traveling abroad

When it comes to language learning , the options are diverse. You can choose from apps, traditional textbooks, and language courses to podcasts and YouTube videos. I would recommend the previously mentioned Duolingo . In case you fell short and can’t learn the essential travel phrases, or if the situations come your way when those phrases won’t be enough , below you will find language apps I use for you to download before your next trip.

4.1. Google Translate

Google Translate is the most popular language travel app that can be used everywhere. I personally use it on all my travels, when going to Tanzania to learn what some Swahili words mean, when in Mexico to help with my not-the-best Spanish, when in Italy, in Japan and other places. I’m sure you are already familiar with this best language app for travel. The most obvious feature is it will help you translate the destination language into your own one. But the absolute best feature is that it can translate the text using ‘ camera translation ’. All you have to do is open the app, point your camera toward the text in a foreign language and Google Translate will do the rest. Perfect for menus! It also translates text from the photos on your camera roll. And it also works offline, when you download the language pair on your phone. Language: 133 languages Download: iOS | Android | Website Price: Free

4.2. VoiceTra

VoiceTra is a language translation app that translates speech into another language . It is a perfect app for all travelers, supports 31 languages and can be used for free . Although, to make VoiceTra work you will need an Internet connection . The app translates in both ways. From English to foreign language and vice versa . It also offers text input. VoiceTra is great for simple, everyday conversations that you may encounter. Perfect to conquer the language barrier and even more amazing since it allows instant switching between two languages. Use it when buying admission tickets, asking for directions, when on a train or bus, while shopping, or when checking in at a hotel. Language: English, French, Spanish (32 altogether) Download: iOS | Android | Website Price: Free

4.3. SayHi Translate

SayHi Translate language app is an easy-to-use app, designed to be quick, and simple. All you have to do is press a button and start speaking. The app will transcribe your speech quickly and accurately. It supports 101 languages and dialects. It is a free app without any advertisements or hidden fees. In order for the app to work, you will need an internet connection . As soon as you speak, the app will return text and audio in another language. It super easy to change languages quickly and you can even speed up or slow down your speech and choose between male and female voice. Use it on your travels when in an UBER or taxi in a foreign land, when buying local souvenirs from a local lady or when checking in a lovely and unique homestay. Language: English, Arabic, Polish (101 altogether) Download: iOS | Android | Website Price: Free

smarter word for travel

5. Final thoughts on Essential Travel Phrases and Words

Whether it’s a warm greeting, ordering a meal, or expressing gratitude, are only a few useful phrases when traveling that not only open doors to easier communication but also show respect and help you to understand the destination in a different way. Before traveling abroad, learn at least a couple of common travel phrases that will help you navigate through various situations abroad. Travel terms for greetings and introductions and words showcasing politeness. Basic phrases for asking for directions, ordering food, and checking in a hotel. 

Learn useful phrases for traveling with the help of a language app like Duolingo, learn words when on a destination, or combine both with a language translation app like Google Translate. Find what works best for you and overcome language barriers. What travelling phrases do you think are essential? Bon voyage, Anja

➤ What you should read next …

• How to say You have beautiful eyes in 101 different languages • How to say Happy Birthday in 101 different languages • How to say Happy New Year in 100+ different languages spoken around the World • How to say I love you in 101 different languages • How to say Hello in 101 different languages

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Traveling abroad? Anja on Adventure shares a collection of Essential Travel Phrases and Useful words For Travelling you should learn before going abroad. Learn travel phrases for greetings/farewells, exploring town, dining at a restaurant, emergencies, and much more. Check out his article for a smooth landing. | Travel Phrases | Travel tip | Travel Term | Travel Mistakes to Avoid | abroad we go #holiday #greese #travelhacks #smerttravel #languagetip #travelhacks

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Are you ready to travel like a PRO? Save time and money with these travel tips and resources . I personally use these companies to save time and money. They do the work by providing a list of options, prices, and reviews from actual guests, for anywhere I am traveling worldwide. ✈️ FLIGHTS: I use Skyscanner in combination with Google Flights to find amazing flight fares (try the Explore feature). I book directly with an airline or pair it with Iwantthatflight for the best deals. 🏨 ACCOMMODATION: Booking.com is my favorite site for finding great hotel deals. They return the best rates and reviews are from actual guests! 🚘 RENTAL CARS: Discover Cars are my go-to, when planning an epic road trip. 🗽 TOURS & ACTIVITIES: I like to wander around on my own, but when I want to explore with a group, skip the line with an entrance ticket, I book it with GetYourGuide or Viator . ❤️‍🩹 TRAVEL INSURANCE: I never, under any circumstances travel without insurance. In most cases, I use yearly global travel medical insurance. But, if you don’t have that and some impromptu travel plans occur, use SafetyWing . With them, you can buy travel insurance even when you are already abroad. Better be safe, than sorry! 📲 ONLINE SAFETY: NordVPN keeps your devices’ browsing safe and malware-free. Stream shows from around the world, access social media in countries where they are blocked and buy cheap flights by changing your virtual location. 🛜 STAY CONNECTED WITH eSIM: Ditch the plastic SIM cards and waiting in lines at the airport! Airalo eSIMs allow you to connect as soon as you land at your destination. They have eSIMs for over 190+ countries worldwide.

What are essential travel phrases?

Travel phrases are useful phrases to know when traveling abroad. They are a collection of the most common and frequently used words and expressions we use when visiting foreign countries. From basic greetings to phrases for seeking directions, ordering food, and engaging in cultural exchanges.

What are some basic travel phrases for greetings and introductions?

Hello | Goodbye | Nice to meet you Phrases for greetings lay the foundation for any interaction, allowing you to initiate conversations and make a positive first impression. Find more essential travel phrases on Anja On Adventure blog.

What are some common English travel phrases?

Thank you | Please | Excuse me These common travel phrases showcase politeness and cultural respect, fostering positive interactions with locals. Find more common travel phrases on Anja On Adventure blog.

What are some useful travel phrases for directions and getting around?

Where is … | How do I get to … ? | How long …? Useful expressions for travelling for directions enable you to navigate unfamiliar streets and find your way around. Find more useful sentences for travelling and common travel language phrases on Anja On Adventure blog.

What are essential travel phrases when ordering food and drinks?

May I see the menu? | What do you recommend? | Is this … | I’m allergic to … Those are useful travel phrases in English for ordering meals, asking for recommendations, and specifying dietary preferences to ensure enjoyable dining experiences and help you explore local cuisines. Find more English travel expressions on Anja On Adventure blog.

What are practical travel terms for shopping?

How much does it cost? | Could I try this on? | Do you accept credit cards? Practical travel words in English for inquiring about prices, negotiating, and asking for sizes or colors are handy when exploring markets and boutiques. Find more useful English phrases for travelling on Anja On Adventure blog.

What are helpful travel terms in case of emergencies?

Help | I am lost | Please call the … Helpful travel English phrases to learn when traveling are great to know in case of emergencies, natural disasters or if you will be needing assistance in difficult or dangerous situations. Find more English travel terms and phrases on Anja On Adventure blog.

❥ About Anja On Adventure

anja on Adventure

Anja On Adventure is a travel blog, a collection of insider tips and information on destinations, that I visited as a solo female traveler, tour guide, teacher, yacht stewardess, and Survivor challenge tester. Anja, is a thirty-something adventure-seeking, sun chasing, beach hopping, gin-loving, tropics enthusiast with a creative mind and sarcastic spirit, who loves coconut and mango but doesn’t like chocolate and sweets. I am passionate about all things travel, maps, and puzzles. Click here to learn more About me .

About the author: Anja

Photo of author

2 thoughts on “73+ Essential Travel Phrases and Words You Should Know”

I love languages and love this idea. I always try to learn a little of the local language when travelling – I find it so much fun. Love this post!

Thank you so much Maryanne! There is more of those coming … Planning to post one for the language of each country I have visited…

Comments are closed.

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95 most inspirational travel quotes ever penned

Our favourite inspirational travel quotes have encouraged us to travel with abandon over the years. Perhaps they will do the same for you…

For us, there is no such thing as luxury travel; travel is, by default, a luxury. It is a privilege provided by the country of our birth, a privilege that many are not as fortunate to enjoy.

Sometimes, we have to pinch ourselves at just how ridiculous our lives have become: an ex-teacher and jobbing writer travelling the world for a living. It is absurd, it is astonishing, it is luxury.

When I first went travelling at 21 years old, my father gave me this quote scrawled on a piece of card.

inspirational travel quotes

It infused me with wanderlust. It encouraged me to get out of my comfort zone, make the most of my time, see the world and enjoy the freedom that comes with being on the road. It remains one of the most inspirational travel quotes I’ve read (even if Twain did not actually say it).

Today, 20 years and almost 100 countries later, it’s still in my wallet. Despite its tattered and dishevelled appearance, it’s every bit as important to me now as it was then.

With that in mind, we’ve collated our most beloved inspirational travel quotes to encourage readers to “explore, dream and discover” for themselves.

inspirational travel quotes

1. “To my mind, the greatest reward and luxury of travel is to be able to experience everyday things as if for the first time, to be in a position in which almost nothing is so familiar it is taken for granted.” – Bill Bryson

2. “The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page.” – St. Augustine

inspirational travel quotes

3. “Travel is never a matter of money, but of courage.” – Paulo Coelho

4. “With age, comes wisdom. With travel, comes understanding.” – Sandra Lake

smarter word for travel

5. “When overseas you learn more about your own country, than you do the place you’re visiting.” – Clint Borgen

6. “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness.” – Mark Twain

inspirational travel quotes

7. “Don’t tell me the sky’s the limit when there are footprints on the moon.” – Paul Brandt

8. “The man who goes alone can start today; but he who travels with another must wait till that other is ready.” – Henry David Thoreau

smarter word for travel

9. “The first condition of understanding a foreign country is to smell it.” – Rudyard Kipling

10. “A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step.” – Lao Tzu

A journey of a thousand miles... inspirational travel quotes

11. “When preparing to travel, lay out all your clothes and all your money. Then take half the clothes and twice the money.” – Susan Heller Anderson

12. “No place is ever as bad as they tell you it’s going to be.” – Chuck Thompson

smarter word for travel

13. “We live in a wonderful world that is full of beauty, charm and adventure. There is no end to the adventures we can have if only we seek them with our eyes open.” – Jawaharlal Nehru

14. “A good traveler has no fixed plans and is not intent on arriving.” – Lao Tzu

A good traveler... inspirational travel quotes

15. “There is no moment of delight in any pilgrimage like the beginning of it.” – Charles Dudley Warner

16. “A ship in harbor is safe, but that’s not what ships were built for.” – John A. Shedd

smarter word for travel

17. “Tourists don’t know where they’ve been, travelers don’t know where they’re going.” – Paul Theroux

18. “Not all those who wander are lost.” – J. R. R. Tolkien

Not all those who wander are lost... inspirational travel quotes

19. “Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

20. “Like all great travelers, I have seen more than I remember, and remember more than I have seen.” – Benjamin Disraeli

smarter word for travel

21. “Once a year, go somewhere you’ve never been before.” – The Dalai Lama

22. “No one realizes how beautiful it is to travel until he comes home and rests his head on his old, familiar pillow.” – Lin Yutang

How beautiful it is to travel... inspirational travel quotes

23. “What you’ve done becomes the judge of what you’re going to do – especially in other people’s minds. When you’re travelling, you are what you are right there and then. People don’t have your past to hold against you. No yesterdays on the road.” – William Least Heat Moon

24. “There are no foreign lands. It is the traveller only who is foreign.” – Robert Louis Stevenson

smarter word for travel

25. “Travel is glamorous only in retrospect.” – Paul Theroux

26. “A traveller without observation is a bird without wings.” – Moslih Eddin Saadi

Moslih Eddin Saadi inspirational travel quotes

27. “Your true traveller finds boredom rather agreeable than painful. It is the symbol of his liberty-his excessive freedom. He accepts his boredom, when it comes, not merely philosophically, but almost with pleasure.” – Aldous Huxley

28. “One’s destination is never a place, but a new way of seeing things.” – Henry Miller

smarter word for travel

29. “All travel has its advantages. If the passenger visits better countries, he may learn to improve his own. And if fortune carries him to worse, he may learn to enjoy it.” – Samuel Johnson

30. “Wandering re-establishes the original harmony which once existed between man and the universe.” – Anatole France

Wandering... travel quotes

31. “I can’t control the wind but I can adjust the sail.” – Ricky Skaggs

32. “We wander for distraction, but we travel for fulfilment.” – Hilaire Belloc

Travel for fulfilment quote

33. “People travel to faraway places to watch, in fascination, the kind of people they ignore at home.” – Dagobert D. Runes

34. “If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion and avoid the people, you might better stay at home.” – James Michener

James Michener inspirational travel quotes

35. “The use of travelling is to regulate imagination by reality, and instead of thinking how things may be, to see them as they are.” – Samuel Johnson

36. “You don’t have to be rich to travel well.” – Eugene Fodor

Money isn't everything quote

37. “Perhaps travel cannot prevent bigotry, but by demonstrating that all peoples cry, laugh, eat, worry, and die, it can introduce the idea that if we try and understand each other, we may even become friends.” – Maya Angelou

38. “All journeys have secret destinations of which the traveler is unaware.” – Martin Buber

All journeys have secret destinations...

39. “Two roads diverged in a wood and I – I took the one less traveled by.” – Robert Frost

40. “Travel and change of place impart new vigor to the mind.” – Seneca

inspirational travel quotes

41. “Traveling is a brutality. It forces you to trust strangers and to lose sight of all that familiar comfort of home and friends. You are constantly off balance. Nothing is yours except the essential things – air, sleep, dreams, the sea, the sky – all things tending towards the eternal or what we imagine of it.” – Cesare Pavese

42. “Once the travel bug bites, there is no known antidote, and I know that I shall be happily infected until the end of my life.” ― Michael Palin

Once the travel bug bites inspirational travel quote

43. “A journey is best measured in friends, rather than miles.” – Tim Cahill

44. “A journey is like marriage. The certain way to be wrong is to think you control it.” – John Steinbeck

A journey is like marriage... inspirational travel quotes

45. “When you travel, remember that a foreign country is not designed to make you comfortable. It is designed to make its own people comfortable.” – Clifton Fadiman

46. “There are far, far better things ahead than we leave behind.” – C.S. Lewis

There are better things ahead...

47. “Travel does what good novelists also do to the life of everyday, placing it like a picture in a frame or a gem in its setting, so that the intrinsic qualities are made more clear. Travel does this with the very stuff that everyday life is made of, giving to it the sharp contour and meaning of art.” – Freya Stark

48. “To travel is to discover that everyone is wrong about other countries.” – Aldous Huxley

To travel is to discover...

49. “All the pathos and irony of leaving one’s youth behind is thus implicit in every joyous moment of travel: one knows that the first joy can never be recovered, and the wise traveller learns not to repeat successes but tries new places all the time.” – Paul Fussell

50. “I have found out that there ain’t no surer way to find out whether you like people or hate them than to travel with them.” – Mark Twain

Mark Twain Quote about travelling with friends

51. “The whole object of travel is not to set foot on foreign land; it is at last to set foot on one’s own country as a foreign land.” – G.K. Chesterton

52. “Too often travel, instead of broadening the mind, merely lengthens the conversation.” – Elizabeth Drew

Travel broadens the mind inspirational travel quotes

53. “People don’t take trips, trips take people.” – John Steinbeck

54. “Stuff your eyes with wonder, live as if you’d drop dead in ten seconds. See the world. It’s more fantastic than any dream made or paid for in factories.” – Ray Bradbury

See the world quote by Ray Bradbury

55. “Travel makes one modest. You see what a tiny place you occupy in the world.” – Gustave Flaubert

56. “The journey not the arrival matters.” – T. S. Eliot

The journey not the arrival matters

57. “Time flies. It’s up to you to be the navigator.” – Robert Orben

58. “The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.” – Marcel Proust

Marcel Proust quote

59. “I never travel without my diary. One should always have something sensational to read in the train.” – Oscar Wilde

60. “For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.” – Robert Louis Stevenson

I travel for travel’s sake... inspirational travel quotes

61. “If an ass goes travelling, he’ll not come home a horse.” – Thomas Fuller

62. “Travelling tends to magnify all human emotions.” – Peter Hoeg

“Travelling tends to magnify all human emotions.”

63. “To move, to breathe, to fly, to float, To gain all while you give, To roam the roads of lands remote: To travel is to live.” – Hans Christian Andersen

64. “To awaken quite alone in a strange town is one of the pleasantest sensations in the world.” – Freya Stark

A strange town... inspirational travel quotes

65. “I am not the same having seen the moon shine from the other side of the world.” – Mary Anne Radmacher

66. “I always wonder why birds stay in the same place when they can fly anywhere on earth. Then I ask myself the same question.” – Harun Yahya

Puffins rest on a rock

67. “I dislike feeling at home when I am abroad.” – George Bernard Shaw

68. “A wise traveler never despises his own country.” – Carlo Goldoni

A wise traveler... inspirational travel quotes

69. “Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore.” – Andre Gide

70 “Traveling – it leaves you speechless, then turns you into a storyteller.” – Ibn Battuta

Travelling can leave you speechless

71. “We travel, some of us forever, to seek other places, other lives, other souls.” – Anais Nin

72. “Travel is more than the seeing of sights; it is a change that goes on, deep and permanent, in the ideas of living.” – Miriam Beard

Travel is deep and permanent inspirational travel quotes

73. “The gladdest moment in human life, methinks, is a departure into unknown lands.” – Sir Richard Burton

74. “A man of ordinary talent will always be ordinary, whether he travels or not; but a man of superior talent will go to pieces if he remains forever in the same place.” – Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

A tent beneath the stars

75. “He who would travel happily must travel light.” – Antoine de St. Exupery

76. “Our battered suitcases were piled on the sidewalk again; we had longer ways to go. But no matter, the road is life.” – Jack Kerouac

inspirational travel quotes

77. “The more I travelled the more I realised that fear makes strangers of people who should be friends.” – Shirley MacLaine

78. “Live your life by a compass, not a clock.” – Stephen Covey

Inspirational travel quote by Stephen Covey

78. “Our happiest moments as tourists always seem to come when we stumble upon one thing while in pursuit of something else.” – Lawrence Block

80. “Take only memories, leave only footprints.” – Chief Seattle – or Si’ahl

A man walking in the sand featuring the travel quote about footprints

81. “Life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all.” – Helen Keller

82. “It is not down in any map; true places never are.” – Herman Melville

A travel quote from Moby Dick

83. “We live in a world that is full of beauty, charm and adventure. There is no end to the adventures we can have if only we seek them with our eyes open.” – Jawaharlal Nehru

84. “The most beautiful thing in the world is, of course, the world itself” – Wallace Stevens

inspirational travel quote by Wallace Stevens over the blur hole in Belize

85. “Life begins at the end of your comfort zone.” – Neale Donald Walsch

86. “Paris is always a good idea.” – Julia Ormond (although it is often wrongly attributed to Audrey Hepburn)

A photo of the Eiffel Tower featuring the travel quote, Paris is always a good idea

87. “Stop worrying about the potholes in the road and enjoy the trip.” – Babs Hoffman

88. “Travel isn’t always pretty. It isn’t always comfortable. Sometimes it hurts, it even breaks your heart. But that’s okay. The journey changes you; it should change you. It leaves marks on your memory, on your consciousness, on your heart, and on your body. You take something with you. Hopefully, you leave something good behind.” – Anthony Bourdain

inspirational travel quote by Jaime Lyn Beatty over mountaineers

89. “Jobs fill your pocket but adventures fill your soul.” – Jaime Lyn Beatty

90. “It is in our nature to explore, to reach out into the unknown. The only true failure would be not to explore at all.” – Sir Ernest Shackleton

Shackleton's Endurance ship stranded on the ice in Antarctica with an inspirational travel quote

91. “Because in the end, you won’t remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn. Climb that goddamn mountain.” –  Jack Kerouac

92. “Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things can not be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.” – Mark Twain

93. “Live with no excuses and travel with no regrets.” – Oscar Wilde

94. “Remember that happiness is a way of travel – not a destination.” – Roy M Goodman

95. “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” – Mark Twain (or possibly H Jackson Brown Jr )

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The Ultimate Packing List

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Christine Sarkis

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Ashley Rossi

There's a 95 percent chance Senior Editor Christine Sarkis is thinking about travel right now. Follow her on Instagram @postcartography and Twitter @ChristineSarkis .

Christine Sarkis is an SATW-award-winning journalist and executive editor at SmarterTravel. Her stories have also appeared on USA Today, Conde Nast Traveler, Huffington Post, and Business Insider. Her advice has been featured in dozens of print and online publications including The New York Times , Conde Nast Traveler , and People magazine. She has also shared travel tips on television and radio shows including Good Morning America, Marketplace, and Here & Now. Her work has been published in the anthologies Spain from a Backpack and The Best Women's Travel Writing 2008 . She is currently working on a travel memoir.

The Handy Item I Always Pack : The Trtl Pillow . It's easy to pack and comfortable, and makes it so I can actually sleep on flights.

Ultimate Bucket List Experience : Seeing the Aurora Borealis from the comfort of somewhere warm, like a glass igloo or hot spring.

Travel Motto : Curiosity is an amazing compass.

Aisle, Window, or Middle Seat : Aisle all the way.

Email Christine Sarkis at [email protected] .

Ashley Rossi is always ready for her next trip. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram for travel tips, destination ideas, and off the beaten path spots.

After interning at SmarterTravel, Ashley joined the team full time in 2015. She's lived on three continents, but still never knows where her next adventure will take her. She's always searching for upcoming destination hotspots, secluded retreats, and hidden gems to share with the world.

Ashley's stories have been featured online on USA Today, Business Insider, TripAdvisor, Huffington Post, Jetsetter, and Yahoo! Travel, as well as other publications.

The Handy Item I Always Pack : "A reusable filtered water bottle—it saves you money, keeps you hydrated, and eliminates waste—win-win."

Ultimate Bucket List Experience : "A week in a bamboo beach hut on India's Andaman Islands."

Travel Motto : "Travel light, often, and in good company."

Aisle, Window, or Middle Seat : "Window—best view in the house."

Travel Smarter! Sign up for our free newsletter.

Packing mishaps range from inconvenient (heading to the Caribbean without a swimsuit) to disastrous (discovering you left the country without your wallet), but most are preventable. We’ve created this ultimate packing list to help you pack well every time.

The Ultimate Packing Checklist

To see the ultimate packing list, scroll down the page or click here for an editable PDF version that you can save or print out. To customize the list, simply download or print it, then edit for your specific needs. You can also download the editable, mobile-friendly checklist here .

Clothes to Pack

  • Dress Shirts
  • Casual Shirts
  • Sweatshirts
  • Laundry Kit
  • Leisure Shoes
  • Hiking Boots
  • Dress Shoes
  • Collapsible Tote

Shop Our Clothing Packing List

Toiletries to Pack

  • Dental Floss
  • Conditioner
  • Styling Tools
  • Facial Cleanser
  • Face Lotion
  • Moisturizer
  • Contact Lenses
  • Contact Solution
  • Shaving Supplies
  • Makeup Remover
  • Menstrual Products
  • Birth Control/Medication
  • Nail Clippers
  • Hand Sanitizer
  • First-Aid Ointment
  • Insect Repellent
  • Pain Relievers

Shop Our Toiletries Packing List

Miscellaneous Items

  • Laptop/Tablet
  • Film/Memory Card
  • List of Medications
  • Banking Contacts/Information
  • Electronic Chargers
  • Emergency Contacts
  • Copy of Passport
  • Plug Adapter

Shop Our Miscellaneous Items List

What to Pack in Your Carry-on

  • Books or E-Books
  • Travel Blanket
  • Travel Pillow
  • Disinfecting Wipes
  • Change of Clothes
  • Empty Water Bottle
  • In-Flight Medications
  • Passport/Visa/ID
  • Credit/ATM cards
  • Insurance Cards
  • Maps/Directions

Shop Our Carry-On Essentials List

Packing Tips for Clothes and Other Items

Close up of person reading the SmarterTravel Ultimate Packing List on their phone while packing a suitcase

When packing for a vacation the most important things to keep in mind are the length of your trip, the weather, and any non-standard clothing or gear you might need.

Your first step when packing is to decide if you’ll be checking a bag or only taking a carry-on and then curate the amount of clothing you’ll need based on that decision. Typically, you should avoid checking a bag in situations where you have a layover since the likelihood of your bag going missing goes up with every connection . You might also want to avoid checking a bag if you absolutely need items in your bag on arrival—for example, if you’re going on a cruise.

If you’re packing more minimally, focus on packing layering clothes in more neutral colors. That’s not because we don’t like fun colors and patterns; it just means that neutral-colored clothing is more versatile, so you can wear these items more than once when you’re tight on space.

How to Pack in Just a Personal Item Sized Bag

Also invest in clothing that does double duty, like multi-use wraps , crushable hats , self-cooling and heating fabrics like merino wool layers , bug-repellent clothing , wrinkle-resistant shirts, quick-drying activewear and undergarments, casual sneakers, UPF-proof clothing , and compressible jackets … just to name a few. Look toward popular athleisure brands like Lululemon , prAna , and Athleta for comfortable yet stylish travel clothing.

When curating your packing list, you should keep in mind the length of your trip and decide on quantities from there. For a shorter trip (three to five days), you can probably manage with the following: one pair of underwear and socks per day, one pair of pajamas, one to two dressier outfits, one to two activewear or athleisure outfits, one to two casual outfits, and one to two pairs of shoes. For a longer trip (over a week), you can manage with one pair of underwear and socks per day, two pairs of pajamas, three dressier outfits, three to four casual outfits, two pairs of shoes, and two activewear or athleisure outfits.

And if you’re able to do laundry on your vacation, you can probably manage with even fewer items. Just don’t forget to pack a travel laundry kit .

Scrubba Untouched Review

Also make sure to bring along accessories like a money belt, scarf or sarong (can be used for things like an airplane blanket , coverup at the beach, or to throw over your dress on a cool evening), and a collapsible tote or day bag for any extra items you might acquire on your travels. If traveling to a city or destination that is prone to pickpocketing, make sure to pack some pickpocket-proof clothing and gear .

Depending on the type of trip you’re going on, you may need to invest in some special travel gear. We’ve tested out everything from waterproof baby carriers to interchangeable heels , so you can trust our recommendations. If you’re headed out on an organized group tour , you’ll most likely get a packing list from the tour provider, which should make your trip planning easier. If not, do your research online (one tip is to look at locations on Instagram and see what people are wearing) and consult this story for other handy lists of tips.

For more active trips, make sure you have a sturdy pair of hiking boots, quick-drying clothing, a day pack, snacks, and any necessary equipment. Check out our specific packing lists for hiking trips and camping trips .

The 5 Most Crowded National Parks (and Where to Go Instead)

Another type of trip that you may need to pack slightly specific items for is a cruise . Make sure you pack non-standard items like seasickness remedies, formal wear, dress shoes, and your bathing suit. Beach vacations also require different items like water shoes, towels, sunscreen, and maybe even snorkel gear. Luckily for you, we also have a specific cruise packing list and a beach vacation packing list .

Lastly, you need to consider the weather. For warm-weather destinations like jungles and Caribbean islands, you can obviously skip the coats and gloves, but if you’re headed out on a ski vacation then you’ll need a whole slew of things like goggles, a neck gaiter, snow boots, and more. But don’t worry, we’ve got you covered with a specific Caribbean vacation packing list , a Mexico vacation packing list , and even a ski trip packing list .

The Best Ski Hotels in the US

To help keep things organized, we love using packing cubes and/or compression sacks. They’re especially useful for when you’re traveling to multiple destinations in one trip.

Wondering how to pack all of your items? Enter the great debate of the rolling vs. folding method! While this is definitely a personal preference, we put two editors to the test to find out which method is in fact, more space-saving. Watch the video below to see the answer.

How to Pack Toiletries and Medications

Whether it’s important medication or your favorite lipstick, forgetting any type of toiletry can range from being mildly inconvenient to becoming a serious problem. For toiletries, make sure to pack your essentials, like medication, contacts, and any other items that you might not be able to purchase or replace during your travels. (Put them in your carry-on bag, not your checked suitcase.) However, if you forget items like a toothbrush or razor, you can typically call the front desk at the hotel for a spare.

We also recommend traveling with some type of a travel first-aid kit , which includes items like tweezers, first-aid ointment, bandages, travel-sized hand sanitizer, sunscreen, and insect repellent. Make sure to check TSA guidelines if you’re traveling with medication , as well as the policies and regulations at your destination.

Packing Tips for Everything Else …

Traveling without tech items like your phone, laptop, tablet, or camera can be a major bummer. For those traveling abroad, you’ll also want to remember to pack electronic adapters and converters . Other tech-related items for photographers to pack are a sturdy camera bag , backup batteries, and memory cards, as well as lens cleaner. And don’t forget smartphone essentials like a backup charger, waterproof case if you’re headed out on the water, and a phone stand or tripod for photos.

A travel packing tip we’ve learned the hard way? Travel with a copy of your passport, credit card, and bank contacts, as well as a list of medications and your emergency contacts.

If you are traveling abroad, we have an entire checklist for you, but the most important thing to note here is your passport and visas . Make sure that your passport is up to date, has as least six months of validity, and has enough blank pages for any stamps. Another tip for international travel? Give yourself plenty of time to apply for any visas that you might need and to arrange for a visit to a travel clinic if any special medications or vaccines are needed. You should also familiarize yourself with any remaining COVID-19 travel restrictions at your destination.

There are also some items that you may not think to pack, but should, like an electronic tracker , duct tape , toilet paper, a decoy wallet, or a whistle.

The 10 Best Expandable Suitcases

What to Always Pack in Your Carry-on Bag

In case you’re separated from your checked bag or other items, you should always make sure that you have your ID, wallet, house keys, medications, valuables, camera, phone, laptop, tablet, pen, cash and cards, glasses, and copy of your itinerary with you on the plane.

Other items that you might want to have handy with you include entertainment for your flight, comfort-promoting items like a blanket or pillow, as well as an empty water bottle to fill up post-security (here is a list of our favorites ), a change of clothes (just in case your luggage is lost or delayed), snacks, and gum.

If you’re looking to pack carry-on only, you guessed it: We also have a separate packing list and tips for that, as well as the best bags to use for carry-on only .

What to Pack to Stay Healthy While Traveling

The pandemic has significantly changed the way we travel and, by extension, the items we prioritize in our luggage. While many destinations have loosened or entirely lifted COVID-19 restrictions, some venues and events may still require a mask or proof of vaccination/negative COVID test to enter. Plan ahead to see if any activities on your itinerary have restrictions in place.

Sanitizing wipes and hand sanitizer , while always a good idea to have on hand at the airport , have become absolute carry-on musts. Wiping down areas like your tray table, airplane seat armrest, and hotel television remote can spare you from a variety of common travel bugs.

Editor’s note: This story was originally published in 2013. It has been updated to reflect the most current information. Ashley Rossi contributed to this story.

All of the products featured in this story were hand-selected by our travel editors. Some of the links featured in this story are affiliate links, and SmarterTravel may collect a commission (at no cost to you) if you shop through them.

You Might Also Like:

We hand-pick everything we recommend and select items through testing and reviews. Some products are sent to us free of charge with no incentive to offer a favorable review. We offer our unbiased opinions and do not accept compensation to review products. All items are in stock and prices are accurate at the time of publication. If you buy something through our links, we may earn a commission.

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100 Comprehensive Travel Keywords During Your Keyword Research?

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SEO is the biggest driver of organic traffic to your website. When you use the right keywords in your content, you can get greater online visibility. 

Understanding the best Keyword for travel is essential in creating successful and effective travel blog posts.

Although the travel industry is a competitive space, with basic SEO knowledge and keyword research, you can set your website up to attract more visitors.  

However, with so many other tasks involved in running a travel blog, finding the time for keyword research can be challenging.

This leads to the question: when should you do keyword research? This blog post will discuss the best timing for keyword research, how it can benefit your travel blog, and the best keywords for a travel blog.

So, if you’re a travel blogger looking to improve your SEO game, keep reading to learn more about the importance of keyword research for travel bloggers.

the Importance of having the best Travel Keywords

Keyword research plays a crucial role in the success of travel blogging. It is a vital tool for understanding what people are searching for in relation to your travel niche and allows you to create content that is not only informative and engaging but also optimized for search engines.

Incorporating relevant travel keywords into your blog posts increases the chances of your content being discovered, more organic traffic, and, ultimately, increased page views.

One of the critical benefits of keyword research for travel bloggers is the ability to tap into the mindset of your audience.

You can tailor your content to address their needs, preferences, and interests by understanding the specific search terms they are using.

This helps you to create more relevant and targeted blog posts that resonate with your readers, making them more likely to stay on your site, engage with your content, and even convert into loyal followers.

Another important aspect of travel keyword research is its impact on search engine optimization (SEO).

By incorporating keywords into your blog posts, you signal to Google what your content is about, helping them to index and rank your site more accurately.

This increases the likelihood of your blog appearing higher in Google search results (SERPs), making it more visible and driving organic traffic to your site.

Overall, keyword research is a fundamental aspect of travel blogging that should not be overlooked.

By dedicating time and effort to keyword research , you can ensure that your blog effectively reaches and engages with your intended audience, helping you grow your blog and achieve your blogging goals.

smarter word for travel

Optimal Times to Conduct Travel Keyword Research

To maximize the effectiveness of your keyword research for travel blogs, it’s essential to consider the optimal times to conduct keyword research.

While keyword research can be done at any time, specific periods can provide better results and help you stay ahead of the competition.

One of the best times to conduct keyword research is during the initial stages of planning your blog post.

By identifying relevant keywords early on, you can ensure that your future blog posts are strategically optimized from the start.

This allows you to align your content creation process with the keywords most likely to drive organic traffic to your site.

Another opportune time to research keywords for travel is when you’re brainstorming new blog post ideas.

By conducting keyword research during this phase, you can uncover popular search terms related to your travel niche and use them as inspiration for your content.

This ensures your blog posts are interesting, informative, and highly relevant to those Googling-specific travel keyphrases.

In addition, it’s beneficial to revisit and update your keyword research periodically.

Trends and search behaviors can change over time, so by regularly conducting keyword research, you can stay up-to-date with the latest keywords that resonate with your audience.

This will help you consistently optimize your blog content and maintain its visibility in search engine results.

By strategically timing your keyword research, you can ensure that your travel blog stays relevant, attracts more readers, and continues to grow in popularity.

Strategies to Effectively Implement Keywords for Travel

To effectively carry out keyword research for your travel blog, here are some strategies to consider:

1. Use keyword research tools

There are various keyword research tools available that can help you identify relevant and popular keywords for your travel niche.

These tools provide insights into search volume, competition, and related keywords, allowing you to make informed decisions about which keywords to target.

2. Analyze your competition

Take a look at what keywords your competitors are ranking for. This can give you valuable insights into which keywords are driving traffic to their blogs and help you identify any gaps or opportunities that you can capitalize on.

3. Focus on long-tail keywords

Long-tail keywords are longer, more specific keyword phrases that often have lower search volume but higher intent.

By targeting long-tail keywords, you can attract a more targeted audience and increase your chances of ranking higher in search engine results.

4. Consider user intent

When conducting keyword research, it’s important to consider the intent behind the search query. Are users looking for information, inspiration, or to book a trip?

By understanding the intent, you can tailor your content to meet their needs and increase the chances of converting them into readers or customers.

5. Monitor and track keyword performance

Once you have incorporated keywords into your blog posts, monitoring their performance is important.

Use analytics tools to track the organic traffic, engagement, and conversions generated by specific keywords.

This will help you identify which keywords are bringing the most value to your blog and make adjustments as needed.

By implementing these strategies, you can effectively carry out keyword research for your travel blog and improve its visibility, attract more readers, and achieve your blogging goals.

Remember, keyword research is an ongoing process, so it’s essential to regularly review and update your keywords to stay ahead of the competition.

  • Use the target or main keyword within the first 100 words of your page.
  • Don’t add an outgoing link with your keyword ad anchor text.
  • Aim to use each keyword two times naturally.

smarter word for travel

Tips for Incorporating Keywords into Your Travel Blog Posts

In order to effectively incorporate keywords into your travel blog posts, consider the following tips:

1. Utilize keywords naturally

While it’s essential to include your chosen keywords throughout your content, it’s crucial to do so in a natural and organic way.

Avoid keyword stuffing or forcing keywords into your writing. Instead, focus on creating high-quality, informative content that naturally incorporates your keywords.

2. Include keywords in your title and headings

One of the most impactful places to include keywords is in your blog post titles and headings. This not only helps search engines understand the relevance of your content but also catches the attention of readers searching for specific terms.

3. Optimize your meta tags

Meta tags, including your meta title and meta description, play a significant role in search engine optimization. Incorporate your target keywords into these tags to improve your blog post’s visibility in search engine results.

4. Create unique and engaging content

While incorporating keywords is important, it’s equally crucial to create unique and engaging content that appeals to your audience.

Your blog posts should provide valuable information and insight into your travel niche, encouraging readers to stay on your site and explore more of your content.

5. Don’t forget about image optimization

Images can also contribute to your blog’s visibility in search engine results. Optimize your image alt text and file names with relevant keywords to increase the chances of your images being discovered.

How To Pinpoint Your Ideal Travel Keywords

When identifying travel keywords for your web content, there are three points to think about:

  • Search Volume : The number of times users search a keyword in a month. The higher the search volume, the more web traffic you can get from the keyword.
  • Difficulty : Generally speaking, keywords with a higher search volume and commercial intent are more challenging to rank for. And if you’re competing against loads of high-authority websites for a specific keyword, it will also be more challenging to rank for.
  • Search inten t: When people enter keywords into the search bar, does the content in the results give them the information they are looking for? Offer the information that the person wants, and the keywords will bring you relevant traffic, not just a lot of traffic. 

High-Volume Travel Keywords

Below you will find a list of some of the most popular keywords in the travel niche along with their global monthly search volume on Google.

If your website or business focuses on travel, these keywords can be helpful for content ideas and increasing your SEO presence.

Remember, keyword research is an ongoing process, so regularly revisit and update your keywords to stay ahead of the competition and ensure continued success.

Final Thoughts

While these are pretty general keywords, they do at least provide a base from which you can brainstorm ideas for your travel business. 

Because travel is a hot topic online, the competition on the SERPs is pretty high. Taking a data-informed approach to optimizing your content will better position your website for ranking. 

Remember, ranking content on search engines is not a quick fix and doesn’t happen overnight. So, it’s a good idea to include other types of marketing in your overall strategy to grow your travel business. 

Learn how to do keyword research with Me

You’ve learned the basics about how to do keyword research, but if you’re looking to take your keyword research skills to the next level, I am here to help to schedule a SEO Strategy Call today

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smarter word for travel

100+ SMART Travel Goals

This page features a curated list of travel goals. I created it as a source of inspiration for my 100 life goals project and wanted to share it with others in hopes of inspiring them to create their own goal list.

There is an overabundance of bucket list ideas circulating online that lack the necessary specificity, measurability, and time-bound nature to make them actionable goals. Therefore, I curated a list of SMART goals that are more specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Whether you're young or old, there's something on this list for everyone. So, read on to discover some of the best travel goals that can help you transform your life and achieve your travel dreams.

An important note before scrolling down:

The list below includes 100+ travel goal ideas, but if you're looking for a bigger list then download my book, The SMART Bucket List .

smarter word for travel

It includes a list of 1000+ SMART goal ideas from various categories, such as fitness, travel, personal growth, and more. Each goal is crafted to meet the SMART criteria, making it a valuable resource for anyone looking to create a truly actionable goal list.

Click here to download it for FREE . Additionally, you’ll get my Design Your Dream Year workbook, containing a proven step-by-step action plan to check off those big goals on your list.

* One more thing, if you decide to take part in any of the goals listed below, you do so entirely at your own risk. Some of the goal ideas listed here can be risky, so seek out guidance if you decide to try them out, especially the challenging ones.

With this in mind, let's rock and roll!!

SMART Landmark Travel Goals

smarter word for travel

Here are a few specific examples of SMART goals that you can set for this type of travel:

  • Visit Machu Picchu within the next 2 years
  • Visit the Great Wall of China within the next year
  • Visit the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam within the next year
  • Visit the Colosseum in Rome within the next year
  • Visit the Petra archaeological site in Jordan within the next 3 years
  • Visit the Alhambra palace in Granada, Spain within the next year
  • Visit the Acropolis in Athens within the next year
  • Visit the Palace of Versailles in France within the next year
  • Visit the Great Pyramids of Giza in Egypt within the next year
  • Visit the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona within the next year
  • Visit the Taj Mahal in Agra, India within the next year
  • Visit the Forbidden City in Beijing within the next year
  • Visit the Palace of Westminster in London within the next year
  • Visit the Palace of the Grand Master of the Knights of Rhodes within the next year
  • Visit the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris within the next year
  • Visit the Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro within the next year
  • Visit the Acropolis in Athens, Greece within the next year
  • Visit the ancient city of Pompeii in Italy within the next year
  • Visit the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco within the next year
  • Visit the Tower of London within the next year
  • Visit the Vatican City in Rome within the next year
  • Visit Machu Picchu in Peru within the next year
  • Visit the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul within the next year
  • Visit the temples of Angkor Wat in Cambodia within the next two years
  • Travel to Australia to see the Great Barrier Reef within the next three years
  • Visit the Galapagos Islands within the next three years
  • Visit Iceland to see the Northern Lights within the next two years
  • Visit the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam within the next year
  • Travel to Australia to see the Great Barrier Reef within the next three years, booking the trip by the end of this year

SMART Luxury/Alternative Travel Goals

smarter word for travel

  • Stay in a houseboat in Amsterdam within the next year
  • Stay in a yurt in Mongolia within the next 3 years
  • Stay in an igloo hotel in Lapland within the next 2 years
  • Spend a week on a houseboat on the backwaters of Kerala within the next 2 years
  • Stay in a castle hotel in Scotland within the next 2 years
  • Stay in an eco-lodge in the Amazon Rainforest within the next 3 years
  • Spend a week in a treehouse in Costa Rica within the next 3 years
  • Spend a week in a yurt in Mongolia within the next 3 years
  • Stay in a traditional ryokan in Japan within the next 3 years
  • Spend a week on a houseboat on Lake Powell within the next 3 years
  • Stay in an ice hotel in Sweden within the next 4 years
  • Stay in an overwater bungalow in Bora Bora within the next 2 years
  • Spend a week in a beachfront villa in Bali within the next 2 years

SMART Epic Journeys Goals

smarter word for travel

Here are a few examples of SMART goals in this specific area of travel:

  • Take a road trip along the Pacific Coast Highway from San Francisco to San Diego within the next year
  • Take a road trip through the Scottish Highlands within the next 3 years
  • Go on a road trip through the Australian Outback within the next 2 years
  • Take a road trip along the California coast with the family during the kids' spring break
  • Take a roadtrip trip to explore national parks in Utah next year
  • Take a road trip to Yellowstone National Park during the summer of next year
  • Take a road trip to explore the Grand Canyon in Arizona within the next 2 years
  • Take a train journey on the Trans-Siberian Railway within the next 5 years
  • Take a cross-country rail trip across the United States within the next 2 years
  • Take a family trip to Hawaii to learn about Hawaiian culture within the next 3 years
  • Go on a backpacking trip in the Andes Mountains within the next 4 years
  • Spend a week exploring the ancient ruins of Athens within the next 2 years
  • Spend a month exploring the Galapagos Islands within the next 4 years
  • Explore the European countryside via rail, taking a scenic route from Amsterdam to Vienna and visiting at least 5 other countries along the way, within the next 3 years
  • Take a cruise to Alaska within the next three years
  • Cruise down the Nile River within the next 5 years
  • Take a river cruise down the Danube within the next 2 years
  • Spend a week on a cultural immersion program in Morocco within the next 3 years
  • Take a luxury rail journey on the Eastern and Oriental Express from Singapore to Bangkok, including a private cabin, fine dining, and sightseeing, within the next 2 years
  • Take a solo rail trip to Japan, visiting Tokyo, Kyoto, and other cities on the Shinkansen bullet train network within the next 18 months
  • Take a solo road trip to Australia, exploring the vast countryside from Perth to Sydney on the Indian Pacific, within the next 2 years
  • Take a road trip to New Orleans during Mardi Gras, joining in the festivities and experiencing the city's rich culture and history, within the next 2 years
  • Take a scenic cruise through the Norwegian fjords, stopping at picturesque towns and villages along the way, within the next 2 years
  • Complete a multi-day trek to Everest Base Camp in Nepal, reaching an altitude of at least 17,500 feet, within the next 3 years

SMART Travel Experiences Goals

smarter word for travel

Here are some examples of SMART goals that you can set for this type of travel:

  • Go on a wine-tasting tour of Napa Valley within the next year
  • Go on a safari in Kenya within the next 3 years
  • Go on a whale watching tour in Alaska within the next year
  • Spend a week on a meditation retreat in Bali within the next 3 years
  • Spend a week on a yoga retreat in India within the next 3 years
  • Spend a week volunteering in a rural village in Tanzania within the next 4 years
  • Go on a Disney Land vacation with the family within the next 2 years
  • Go on a surf trip in Hawaii within the next 2 years
  • Visit the Blue Lagoon in Iceland within the next year
  • Spend a week skiing in the Swiss Alps within the next 2 years
  • Take a photography tour of Iceland within the next 3 years
  • Take a language immersion course in a foreign country within the next year
  • Go on a food tour of Italy within the next 2 years
  • Go on a culinary tour of Japan within the next 2 years
  • Go on a glacier hiking tour in Iceland within the next 2 years
  • Attend a traditional tea ceremony in Japan, learning about the history and cultural significance of the practice, within the next year

SMART Festivals & Celebration Goals

smarter word for travel

Here are a few examples of SMART goals that you can set for this type of travel:

  • Attend the Carnival in Rio de Janeiro within the next 3 years
  • Attend the Dia de los Muertos celebrations in Mexico within the next 2 years
  • Attend the Holi Festival in India within the next 2 years
  • Attend the Mardi Gras celebration in New Orleans within the next year
  • Attend the Oktoberfest in Munich, Germany, experiencing the food, music, and beer culture of this iconic event, within the next 2 years
  • Attend the Full Moon Party in Thailand within the next 3 years
  • Attend the Running of the Bulls in Pamplona within the next 2 years
  • Attend the next Summer Olympics
  • Attend the Burning Man Festival in Nevada, USA, within the next 3 years, experiencing the art, music, and community of this unique event
  • Visit Rio de Janeiro during Carnival, watching the parade and experiencing the vibrant atmosphere, within the next 18 months
  • Explore the colorful and elaborate Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico City, visiting museums, markets, and cemeteries, within the next year
  • Attend the Coachella music festival in California, USA, watching live performances by my favorite artists and discovering new ones, within the next 12 months
  • Visit the Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival in China, admiring the incredible ice sculptures and enjoying winter sports, within the next 3 years
  • Take a trip to India during Diwali, experiencing the vibrant lights, music, and food of the country's biggest festival, within the next 2 years
  • Attend the La Tomatina festival in Bunol, Spain, participating in the tomato fight and experiencing the local culture, within the next 18 months
  • Take a trip to Thailand during Songkran, experiencing the traditional water festival and learning about the country's culture and history, within the next year
  • Attend the Sundance Film Festival in Utah, USA, watching independent films and meeting filmmakers and actors, within the next 12 months
  • Visit Edinburgh, Scotland, during the Fringe Festival, experiencing the world's largest arts festival and enjoying the city's history and architecture, within the next 2 years
  • Attend the Holi Festival of Colors in India, experiencing the colorful powders and music of this joyous celebration, within the next 18 months
  • Take a trip to Japan during the Cherry Blossom Festival, admiring the stunning blooms and experiencing the country's unique culture and food, within the next 3 years
  • Attend the Rioja Wine Harvest Festival in Spain, experiencing the wine-making process and enjoying the food, music, and culture of the region, within the next year
  • Attend a major international music festival, such as Coachella or Glastonbury, within the next 2 years, seeing at least 10 different artists perform live

SMART Romance Travel Goals

smarter word for travel

  • Take a honeymoon trip to Bora Bora and stay in an overwater bungalow for at least a week within the next year
  • Renew our vows on a secluded beach in the Caribbean, with a private ceremony and a romantic dinner on the sand within the next 2 years
  • Plan a surprise weekend getaway to a cozy cabin in the woods, complete with a fireplace and hot tub, within the next 6 months
  • Book a romantic river cruise in Europe, visiting at least 4 different countries and enjoying gourmet dining and entertainment along the way within the next 3 years
  • Take a couples' cooking class in Tuscany, Italy, learning to make authentic pasta and enjoying local wine and cheese within the next 18 months
  • Spend a week in Bali, Indonesia, indulging in spa treatments and enjoying the beautiful beaches and temples within the next 2 year
  • Take a road trip along the California coast, stopping at romantic destinations such as Big Sur and Napa Valley within the next year
  • Plan a surprise date night in Paris, France, including a private boat ride on the Seine and a romantic dinner at a Michelin-starred restaurant within the next 6 months
  • Attend a destination wedding in Mexico and extend the trip to enjoy a romantic beach getaway, with activities such as snorkeling and horseback riding within the next year
  • Book a luxury safari in Tanzania, staying in a private tented camp and seeing the Big Five animals in their natural habitat within the next 3 years
  • Take a romantic hot air balloon ride over the Napa Valley, followed by a private wine tasting and gourmet lunch within the next 2 years
  • Plan a surprise weekend trip to New York City, including tickets to a Broadway show and a carriage ride through Central Park within the next 6 months
  • Take a couples' yoga retreat in Costa Rica, practicing mindfulness and relaxation techniques in a beautiful natural setting within the next 18 months
  • Visit the ancient ruins of Machu Picchu in Peru, hiking the Inca Trail and enjoying a romantic dinner with a view of the mountains within the next 3 years
  • Book a private yacht charter in the Greek Islands, exploring the crystal clear waters and enjoying sunset dinners on deck within the next 2 years

Other Travel Goals

smarter word for travel

Here are a few more examples of SMART goals that you can set in the area of travel:

  • Visit at least 10 countries in the next 5 years
  • Visit three new countries within the next two years, spending at least two weeks in each country
  • Visit all seven continents before turning 40, completing the goal within the next 10 years
  • Achieve status as a top-tier frequent traveler with a major rail company by logging at least 50,000 miles in the next 12 months
  • Visit every single station on the New York City Subway system by the end of next year, taking a picture at each stop as evidence
  • Plan and book a multi-generational family vacation by rail, including grandparents, parents, and children, to a scenic destination in the next 2 years
  • Visit the Seven Wonders of the World, including the Great Wall of China, the Taj Mahal, and the Colosseum, within the next 10 years

The SMART Bucket List

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How I Discovered eSIMs to Be the Smart Choice for Travelers

So long, roaming hassles! Using an eSIM for roaming is the best travel decision I've made in a long time.

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Want to carefully manage and minimize roaming charges? An eSIM could be ideal.

Back in 2010, I took a backpacking trip around Indonesia for two months. I didn't travel with a mobile phone. All I had was my trusty Lonely Planet guidebook for recommendations, and the occasional stop at an internet cafe to email location updates to my parents.

Now, in 2024, I can't fathom how I managed to travel without the internet constantly at my fingertips. A phone is a travel essential and roaming while I'm overseas is non-negotiable -- and if I listed the reasons why, I'd be here all day. But roaming, if you're not careful, can also get expensive.

No matter where you're coming from or where you're traveling to, ensuring that you have internet access without running up a scary bill is a travel essential , and something you should ideally look into before you leave on your trip.

Carriers know how important it is for you to stay connected while you're traveling, and most have some kind of roaming deal you can take advantage of. But what happens when your network's roaming offering doesn't meet your data requirements for your destination, or is just too expensive?

Discovering the brilliance of eSIMs

Turns out, there's a very simple, practical solution if you have an unlocked phone like me: the eSIM. It's an electronic form of a SIM card embedded into your phone, which allows you to switch between carriers and data plans without the faff of removing and replacing physical SIM cards. The result is that you can have several SIM cards associated with your phone at once, allowing you to easily switch between plans and carriers as you travel.

In the past I'd opted for a Mi-Fi device equipped with a local pay-as-you-go SIM card when I touched down in a new country. This let me keep using my phone number and ensured I had internet access when I was out and about during the day. It's a fiddly solution, though, which usually involves finding somewhere to buy a SIM card immediately after getting off a long flight, and then remembering to charge the Mi-Fi every night.

I turned to eSIM as a last resort, but I won't be going back. I'm based in the UK, and my operator GiffGaff only allows limited roaming in select European countries. While planning a trip to the US and Canada last year, I was once again about to reach for my trusty Mi-Fi when I remembered something I'd heard about eSIM roaming operators.

From attending mobile phone events over the years, I had a vague understanding of eSIM technology, but I'd never considered using it personally for travel before this trip. It's not unusual to have a lack of awareness about how eSIM technology could benefit you while traveling. According to research due to be published this month by tech analysis firm CCS Insight, only 37% of Americans have heard of eSIM and only 8% have used an eSIM roaming provider.

One of the biggest challenges for eSIM providers is that most people are still unaware that eSIM exists as an option for them, says CCS Insight Director Kester Mann. Even if they have heard of it, less technically savvy customers may be put off by the installation instructions. Plus, it's often another thing to add to a long prevacation to-do list (although you can also do it when you arrive).

Another obstacle is that a lot of the names in eSIM game are new, said Mann. "People perhaps are a little bit nervous around signing up to the company they haven't heard of, or one that perhaps hasn't got an established reputation."

How I used Airalo's eSIM for traveling

There are a number of roaming eSIM providers that you can use, all offering competitive rates on data bundles, and different benefits across different regions. There's scope for many more providers to pop up in the near future, but for now some of the biggest names include Airhub, EasySim, Holafly and Airalo.

iPhone showing instructions in Airalo app

All the instructions you need can be found in Airalo's app.

In my research I couldn't find much to separate them and decided to take a chance on Airalo due to the diverse range of countries it supported. Installing an eSIM and getting it up and running isn't an entirely frictionless process, but by carefully following Airalo's in-app step-by-step instructions, I got it right the first time. 

Each country requires a different eSIM, and you can have multiple eSIMs installed on your phone at once. After you've installed your first eSIM, adding more is pretty intuitive -- everything can be done from within the Airalo app.

For a trip at the end of 2023, I activated two eSIMs, one for the US and one for Canada, buying 20GB of data for $42 and 3GB of data for $15 respectively. I was pleased to find when I returned to Canada this year that I could simply reactivate the eSIM I'd installed and upload more pay as you go credit to see me through my trip.

As I landed in Canada from the US, I switched my primary data plan to my preinstalled Canada eSIM in my iPhone settings and I was good to go immediately. It was so frictionless that I even decided to plump for eSIM on my trip to Barcelona for Mobile World Congress in March. My UK plan allows me to use 5GB of data while roaming in Spain, but for an intense week at a conference I knew this wouldn't be enough. Instead I spent $12 on a 10GB eSIM, and even though I had to top this up during the week, it remained a bargain.

Like me, most people who try eSIM roaming have a positive experience, says Mann. But he advises people to do their research and compare costs with their domestic provider before they head off on vacation to ensure it makes sense for them. Opting for eSIM might be especially good if you're traveling to "more far-flung destinations that aren't typically covered in operators' roaming packages," he adds.

Which phones have eSIM capability?

Another key thing to bear in mind if you're considering an eSIM for roaming is to check whether it's available on your phone. Not all phones are currently eSIM-compatible, but if you have an iPhone XS, iPhone XS Max, iPhone XR or any post-2019 Apple phone, you'll be able to take advantage of the technology. Some Samsung, Motorola and Google phones also have eSIM compatibility, but you'll have to look up your model individually if you're not sure. You'll also need to make sure your phone isn't locked by your carrier.

Something I discovered on my eSIM journey so far is that it's a fairly low-stakes technology to experiment with. It's affordable, flexible and temporary. If I find a better deal on another provider later, it'll be easy for me to switch. 

The market is booming right now, with about 700 million people in the world owning eSIM-compatible devices and as many as 10% of people in some countries purchasing an eSIM before they travel, according to CCS Insight. If you're traveling abroad this summer, whether it be to Europe, Asia or just over the border to Mexico or Canada, why not join us?

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Ed Dwight, the First Black Astronaut Candidate in the U.S., Finally Travels to Space at 90 Years Old

The former Air Force pilot trained to become an astronaut in the 1960s but was never selected by NASA. On a Blue Origin flight Sunday, he became the oldest person to go to space

Will Sullivan

Will Sullivan

Daily Correspondent

Ed Dwight raises arms outside capsule

More than 60 years after he became the United States’ first Black astronaut candidate, Ed Dwight finally flew to space.

On Sunday, Blue Origin’s New Shepard rocket carried six people to and from the Kármán line—the boundary 62 miles above Earth’s surface where the atmosphere ends and space begins. Dwight, a former Air Force captain, was among the crew. President John F. Kennedy selected him as an astronaut candidate in 1961, but Dwight was never admitted to NASA’s astronaut training program and had never been to space.

After stepping out of the capsule last weekend upon his return to Earth, the 90-year-old Dwight lifted both arms over his head in celebration.

“Fantastic! A life-changing experience. Everyone needs to do this!” he said, per NPR ’s Scott Neuman. “I didn’t know I needed this in my life, but now I need it in my life.”

Soon, Ed Dwight will complete a mission that began 63 years ago. Watch: https://t.co/TH41xP0MkB pic.twitter.com/aNmFjltM6z — Blue Origin (@blueorigin) May 19, 2024

Dwight was born in 1933 Kansas City, Kansas. He joined the U.S. Air Force in 1953, completed pilot training and served as a military fighter pilot, according to his personal website . In 1957, he earned a degree in aeronautical engineering from Arizona State University.

As part of his preparation for becoming an astronaut, Dwight completed the experimental test pilot course and aerospace research pilot training and performed duties as an aerospace research pilot, per his website. Though the Air Force recommended him for astronaut training with NASA, he was not selected, per the Washington Post ’s Christian Davenport.

Dwight left the military in 1966 and had a wide-ranging career: He worked for IBM, developed a restaurant chain and founded a real estate company. He later became a sculptor, creating bronzes of important Black figures in American history, including pioneers in the American West and famous jazz musicians. His sculptures are installed in museums across the country.

Ed Dwight, a young Black man, in the cockpit of a plane

Sunday, Dwight joined five other people on the New Shepard rocket’s trip to space: Mason Angel, the founder of a venture capital fund; Sylvain Chiron, the founder of a craft brewery in France; Kenneth L. Hess, a software engineer and entrepreneur; Gopi Thotakura, a pilot and aviator; and Carol Schaller, a retired accountant who has been traveling the world since being told by her doctor in 2017 that she will go blind.

The launch marked the seventh time Blue Origin has carried tourists to space on one of its rockets. It has now transported 37 people in total on trips beyond the Kármán line, where they experience weightlessness and overhead views of Earth on roughly 11-minute flights .

Blue Origin conducted 16 test flights of its New Shepard rocket, which concluded in 2021. The first crewed flight launched on July 20, 2021, with four people on board—including Jeff Bezos, the company’s founder. Sunday’s launch was Blue Origin’s first tourism flight since an uncrewed rocket’s engine failed during a flight a year and a half ago, per the Washington Post .

The recent flight launched from Texas at 9:35 a.m. local time on Sunday, and the capsule delivered the travelers back to Earth at 9:45 a.m., per the New York Times ’ Amanda Holpuch.

We just completed our seventh human spaceflight and the 25th flight for the New Shepard program. Our #NS25 astronaut crew included: Mason Angel, Sylvain Chiron, Ed Dwight, Ken Hess, Carol Schaller, and Gopi Thotakura. Thank you, astronauts! Learn more: https://t.co/4a0UXRy6p6 pic.twitter.com/kzL5GIQSql — Blue Origin (@blueorigin) May 19, 2024

New Shepard is fully autonomous, meaning it has no pilot. The capsule landed with only two of its three parachutes deployed, but it has been designed to safely land with only one parachute if necessary, per the Blue Origin website .

Dwight is now the oldest person to ever travel to space, surpassing the actor William Shatner, who also flew on a New Shepard rocket in 2021.

“You’ve waited a long time for this opportunity and all of us who stand on your shoulders could not be happier,” Charles Bolden , the first Black NASA administrator, says to ABC News ’ Nadine El-Bawab and Bill Hutchinson in a message to Dwight before the flight launched. “I know how much you have dreamed about this, and I want you to take some time while you are flying to suck it all up and take it all in. You deserve every moment of this. You’ve been a role model and mentor for many of us for so long, and we’re with you there in spirit.”

Dwight tells NPR that he wants to go to space again. “I want to go into orbit. I want to go around the Earth and see the whole Earth.”

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Will Sullivan

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Will Sullivan is a science writer based in Washington, D.C. His work has appeared in Inside Science and NOVA Next .

smarter word for travel

Memorial Day weekend 2024 will be one of busiest for travel, AAA says: How to plan ahead

T he 2024 Memorial Day weekend is on track to be one of the highest traveled since the AAA Auto Club began tracking them in 2000, with people heading out to domestic and international destinations on more once-in-a-lifetime, luxury and solo trips.

"Memorial Day will be the start to a very busy summer of travel," Debbie Haas, vice president of travel for AAA, said. "American travelers are forecast to surpass pre-pandemic levels, making this the busiest Memorial Day holiday weekend in nearly two decades."

Compared to last year, gas prices are up a few cents a gallon ; domestic hotel prices are down slightly, about 5% — and there’s been more interest in traveling to theme parks and entertainment venues and internationally than there has been in a while.

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Top domestic destinations include Orlando, Seattle, New York, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Denver, Anchorage, Fort Lauderdale, Miami, and Boston. Top foreign travel destinations include Italy, Canada, England, France, Ireland, Netherlands and Greece.

Domestic car rental rates nationwide are down about 17%, according to AAA.

Traveling by car

AAA is forecasting nearly 1.3 million Michiganders will travel 50 miles or more, the second highest since it began tracking them, with 1.17 state residents driving, nearly 70,000 flying, and another nearly 60,000 using some other form of transportation.

Nationally, AAA projects the second highest traveled Memorial Day on record, with nearly 43.8 million Americans going 50 miles or more, that’s 1.7 million more travelers than last year, a 4% increase, but slightly behind the 44 million set in 2005.

Of those 43.8 million, most, 38.4 million, are traveling by car and 3.5 million by air.

"Traveling by car is appealing for many people because of the convenience and flexibility it provides," Adrienne Woodland, a AAA spokeswoman said. "However, Memorial Day drivers may have to pay more at the gas pump."

More: Michigan gas prices drop ahead of Memorial Day weekend travel

During last year’s weekend, Michigan gas prices averaged $3.60 per gallon. The state average is up slightly.

"Drivers should expect continued volatility at the pump as the summer driving season gets underway," Woodland said. "The wildcard remains the cost of oil, and unlike last year, there are now two wars — in the Middle East and Ukraine — that could roil the oil market."

Best, worst times to travel

Meanwhile, those flying might want to leave extra time to get to the airport.

Nearly 2 million people are expected to travel by bus, train, and — on cruises, which are popular again.

"This category took the biggest hit during the pandemic," Haas said. "Now — five years later — we’re back to 2019 numbers. Leading the charge is the resurgence in both ocean and river cruising, which came back extremely strong and continues to gain popularity."

AAA said many more people this year have decided to take once-in-a-lifetime and luxury trips, and even take trips by themselves.

If you do plan to travel by car, INRIX — a Kirkland, Washington-based analytics company, urges drivers to leave Thursday or Friday early to avoid commuter traffic. Those going back Sunday or Monday should avoid the afternoon hours, when return trips are at their peak.

The worst times to travel: noon to 6 p.m. Thursday; noon to 7 p.m. Friday; 2-5 p.m. Saturday; and 3-7 p.m. Sunday; and 3-7 p.m. Monday. Best times: before 11 a.m., after 7 p.m. Thursday; before 11 a.m., after 8 p.m. Friday; before 1 p.m., after 6 p.m. Saturday; and before 1 p.m. Sunday; and after 7 p.m. Monday.

"Travel times are expected to be up to 90% longer than normal," Bob Pishue, a transportation analyst at INRIX said. "Travelers should stay up to date on traffic apps, 511 services, and local news stations to avoid sitting in traffic longer than necessary."

Contact Frank Witsil: 313-222-5022 or [email protected].

This article originally appeared on Detroit Free Press: Memorial Day weekend 2024 will be one of busiest for travel, AAA says: How to plan ahead

The Memorial Day weekend could unleash the most Michigan travelers in years, AAA says

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WATCH: High school center fielder sprints home to tag out runner in one of craziest baseball plays you'll see

Mark this down as the ol' '3b, 8u' on your scorecard.

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Normally when a center fielder makes a play at the plate, it involves nailing someone with a rocket of a throw. Well one Ohio high school center fielder used his legs, not his arm, to make a highlight-reel play on Friday.

In a varsity baseball game between Ft. Recovery and Marion Local, Mason Local center fielder Griffin Burns showed previously unseen levels of hustle on a baseball diamond. It all began when Ft. Recovery batter Caden Grisez hit a blooper into the outfield. The ball dropped between three Marion players, and Burns eventually scooped it up.

Normally, this would be a single. But, with the shortstop and second baseman both in shallow center field after unsuccessfully trying to catch the ball, nobody was covering second base, so Grisez kept running. 

The bizarre play set off a chain reaction of uncovered bases (the third baseman went to cover second, leaving third base open; the catcher went to cover third base, leaving home plate open) and an eventual play at the plate that most baseball fans have almost certainly never seen before.

Burns kept the ball in his glove during the whole play, eventually sprinting home, laying out and tagging out Grisez at the plate. Take a look at the madness:

Have you ever seen a center fielder tag someone out at home plate? Well here you go! pic.twitter.com/MORPFxt5Tp — WOSN Sports (@WOSNScores) May 25, 2024

Burns turned on the jets and caught the runner in a bang-bang play at the plate. When the dust literally settled, the umpire ruled that the runner was out in one of the most bizarre baseball plays you'll ever see.

Ft. Recovery did go on to win the game, 11-3, but Burns' effort won't be forgotten anytime soon.

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Finally, the HGTV Dream Home 2024 winner! Find out who won Anastasia Island, Florida, home

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The wait is over! HGTV Network announced a school teacher from Hawthorne, New York, won the 2024 HGTV Dream Home in Florida.

Winning  a Home and Garden Television Network Dream Home  is like winning the lottery — the odds are slim, and only a handful of people have won in the history of the sweepstakes contest.

The winner reveal happened Wednesday. Here's information about who won the keys to the HGTV Dream Home on  Anastasia Island in St. Johns County.

Who won 2024 HGTV Dream Home  on Anastasia Island in Florida sweepstakes contest?

On May 22, HGTV announced the identity of the winner of the HGTV  Dream Home on Anastasia Island  in Northeast Florida, described as "a grand coastal escape." Marie Fratta of New York won the sweepstakes contest.

'A loss for words'

According to HGTV, Fratta was at a loss for words upon receiving the news that she was the winner of the luxurious home.

"This is insane," Fratta said. "I feel like this is a prank."

Fratta, a 25-year veteran educator who teaches fourth grade, had initially been told she was being honored with a teaching award at a local restaurant. As HGTV reports , her friends, co-workers and current and former students assisted the network in organizing the surprise reveal.

Voting ceased for the  sweepstakes  Feb. 15 for the beautiful home that was  designed by architect Michael Stauffer  and built by local builder Glenn Layton Homes. The home's interior design was by Brian Patrick Flynn. The  three-bedroom, four-bathroom home  is about 3,300 square feet with views of the Matanzas River and the St. Augustine Lighthouse.

A look back: Previous winner of HGTV Dream Home in Florida took cash option & sold the home

How much is HGTV Dream Home 2024 worth? What is total HGTV Dream Home grand prize package worth?

Value of the total  Anastasia Island HGTV Dream Home  package is estimated at just over $2.2 million. In total, the winner of the sweepstakes will receive:

  • Keys to the fully furnished home, which, according to rules, includes home furnishings, fixtures, artwork and merchandise for an approximate retail value of $2,069,595
  • A new Mercedes-Benz E Class sedan worth about $70,000, according to the rules
  • $100,000 cash

St. Augustine has its say

Though Fratt was chosen as the winner in February, the Anastasia Island home was at that point facing opposition from the St. Augustine Planning & Zoning Board. The contractor, Coastal Gateway Homes, apparently built a bulkhead without getting approval from the city. At issue were the bulkhead's size, proximity to the marsh of both house and bulkhead, as well as the width of the house.

The city finally approved the bulkhead on April 2 after months of back-and-forth meetings with the contractor and other experts. 

Is there a lump sum or 'cash option' for HGTV Dream Home 2024 contest? Do winners keep the Dream Home?

The contest rules state: "In lieu of taking title to the HGTV Dream Home 2024 (and the contents of the HGTV Dream Home 2024), the grand prize winner will have the option of receiving $650,000 in cash (the "cash option"). If the grand prize winner cannot take possession of the HGTV Dream Home 2024 ... the grand prize winner shall receive the cash option. Total value of the grand prize is $820,000" if the cash option is selected vs. the HGTV Dream Home 2024.

Take the cash, leave the house?

While it's unclear which option Fratta will take, she may want to consider what many past winners have done. For example, David Rennie of Shelton, Conn., won the 2016 HGTV Dream Home in Merritt Island, the last time the Sunshine State hosted the project. Rennie chose the cash option and HGTV sold that home back to the builder.

As a 2019 article in the Miami Herald noted, the cash option is a more recent addition to the sweepstakes. HGTV began including the cash option a few years ago when it became apparent that many winners were forced to sell because they could not afford taxes or upkeep. Up to that point, only six of the first 21 winners lived in the home for more than one year.

It could happen to you? A former Florida man won HGTV Dream Home and $13,000 lottery prize

List of HGTV Dream Home winners

Here's a look back at who won the HGTV Dream Home sweepstakes contests over the years.

  • Marie Fratta from Hawthorne, New York, won the 2024 HGTV Dream Home in Anastasia Island, Florida.
  • Marie Davis of Rock Hill, South Carolina, won the 2023 HGTV Dream Home in Morrison, Colorado.
  • Karey Wolstenholm of Overland Park, Kansas, won the 2022 HGTV Dream Home in Warren, Vermont.
  • Jeff Yanes of Austin, Texas, won the 2021 HGTV Dream Home in Newport, Rhode Island.
  • Susan O'Gorman of Perry, Georgia, won the 2020 HGTV Dream Home on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina.
  • Beverly Fulkerson of Osgood, Indiana, won the 2019 HGTV Dream Home in Whitefish, Montana.
  • Emily Muniz from Nashville, Tennessee, won the 2018 HGTV Dream Home in Gig Harbor, Washington
  • Anna Spangler of Kutztown, Pennsylvania, won the 2017 HGTV Dream Home on St. Simons Island, Georgia.
  • David Rennie of Shelton , Connecticut, won the 2016  HGTV Dream Home on Merritt Island, Florida
  • Kathy O'Dell of Huntsville, Alabama, won the 2015 HGTV Dream Home in Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts.
  • Laura Martin of Boise, Idaho, won the 2014 HGTV Dream Home in Lake Tahoe, California
  • Carole Simpson of Columbia, Tennessee, won the 2013 HGTV Dream Home in Charleston, South Carolina.
  • Vicky Naggy of Pennsylvania won the 2012 HGTV Dream Home in Park City, Utah.
  • Eric Makstenieks of Hinsdale, Illinois, won the 2011 HGTV Dream Home in Stowe, Vermont.
  • Myra Lewis of New Orleans, Louisiana, won the 2010 HGTV Dream Home in Sandia Park, New Mexico.
  • Cheryl Smith of Lakeland, Florida, won the 2009 HGTV Dream Home in Sonoma, California.
  • Stephanie Dee of Solon, Iowa, won the 2008 HGTV Dream Home in Islamorada, Florida.
  • Robert O'Neill of Brandon, Florida , won the 2007 HGTV Dream Home in Winter Park, Colorado.
  • Donald P. Cook of Alum Creek, West Virginia, won the 2006 HGTV Dream Home in Lake Lure, North Carolina.
  • Don Cruz of Chicago, Illinois, won the 2005 HGTV Dream Home in Tyler, Texas.
  • Kathi Nakao of Sacramento, California, won the 2004 HGTV Dream Home in St. Mary's, Georgia.
  • John Groszkiewicz of Erie County, Pennsylvania, won the 2003 HGTV Dream Home in Mexico Beach, Florida.
  • Milton O'Bryant of Midland, Texas, won the 2002 HGTV Dream Home in Sherwood, Maryland.
  • Kathy Hedrick of Gladstone, Missouri, won the 2001 HGTV Dream Home in Camden, Maine.
  • Mary Barker of San Antonio, Texas, won the 2000 HGTV Dream Home in Nehalem, Oregon, according to  liveabout.com .
  • Belinda Brown of Kingston, Tennessee,  won the 1999 HGTV Dream Home in Rosemary Beach , Florida.
  • Tina Carlson of Thousand Oaks, California, won the 1998 HGTV Dream Home in Beaufort, South Carolina.
  • Michele Rambo of Tulsa, Oklahoma, was the very first winner of an HGTV Dream Home, the 1997 HGTV Dream Home in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

Florida Times-Union writer Anne Hammock contributed to this story.

Sangalang is a lead digital producer for USA TODAY Network-Florida. Follow her on  Twitter  or Instagram at  @byjensangalang . Support local journalism.  Consider subscribing to a Florida newspaper .

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