10 Best Things To Do Near Tokyo Station

Tokyo station

Miho Shimizu is a Japanese freelance writer settled in Shizuoka with her husband and two rabbits. Fascinated with traveling at the age of 18, she has spent most of her long holidays exploring incredible spots around Japan. She also loves to listen to music, draw, and read novels over a cup of green tea.

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Tokyo Station is a large red brick building at the heart of the city and the city’s primary gateway to the best tourist attractions in Tokyo . The architectural masterpiece and transportation hub is where many international tourists start their journey in Japan and where thousands of people commute to work or school every day. It is also the very center of major public transport lines such as JR trains, buses and subways that takes us everywhere in Tokyo as well as all over Japan . Not just a train station, Tokyo station itself can be an attractive tourist destination with a number of interesting spots around. Spending hours, or even a whole day near Tokyo Station will enable you to get to know the transportation hub as well as the surrounding area –  a beautiful area of Tokyo with its vast green surroundings that are especially lovely in the spring and autumn. Here is our list of 10 best things to do near Tokyo station!           

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tourist spot near tokyo station

1. Tokyo Station Gallery

3. yaesu shopping mall, 4. tokyo ramen street, 5. imperial palace, 6. mitsubishi ichigokan museum, 7. marunouchi brick square, 8. wadakura fountain park, 9. national museum of modern art, 10. nihonbashi area, japan wonder travel tours , other articles you might enjoy.

Tokyo Station Gallery is a small, cozy art museum that offers a great opportunity for everyone to appreciate impressive artworks and paintings in Tokyo Station Marunouchi Building, just outside of the North Exit. The gallery has a range of intriguing temporary exhibitions that regularly change, often focused on modern art. As you walk down the spiral stairs, you can take a close look at the old bricks used for the walls of the original Tokyo Station. At the museum shop, you can find a wide range of items and merchandise such as lovely mugs with the original logo on them.

tourist spot near tokyo station

Tokyo Station Gallery 10am – 6pm (※Closed on Monday) Admission varies depending on the exhibition 

KITTE is a giant shopping complex near Tokyo station located on the former site of the Tokyo Central Post Office. It is conveniently connected to Tokyo Station, Marunouchi line. It is also about a 1min walk from the Marunouchi South Gate of Tokyo Station, making it a perfect shopping spot even on rainy days . It comprises 7 floors filled with dining spots, fashion boutiques, souvenir shops and much more. Some shops specialize in dealing with local specialties and great products carefully selected from around Japan. Visiting these shops will enable you to discover incredible local specialties without traveling to the actual place. In the first basement, you can find Tokyo City i , a helpful information center offering a range of information for international tourists in multiple languages!    

kitte

If you want an exciting shopping experience around Tokyo Station, head to Yaesu shopping mall which is also directly connected to the station! This underground shopping hub is home to approximately 160 shops, including 60 restaurants and cafes, clothing stores, stylish boutiques, and much more. A range of helpful services such as foreign currency exchange and coin lockers are also available, which makes it attractive for (international) tourists to shop around the massive shopping mall.

Tokyo Station is home to a number of great dining spots, including fancy restaurants and casual cafes. Tokyo Ramen Street is literally a heaven for ramen lovers. Here you can find 8 renowned ramen shops that all offer incredible ramen experiences for everyone. Try Shoyu Chuka Soba at Chiyogami for a more a traditional ramen taste created by soy-based brown broth along with flavorful toppings. Oreshiki Jun is a perfect choice for those who want a thick pork-bone ramen. Soranoiro Nippon serves a healthy veggie ramen featuring a variety of seasonal vegetables for the noodles, broth and the toppings. Vegan and gluten-free menu is also available.   

Ramen

If you want to visit somewhere not only historic but refreshing, head to Tokyo Imperial Palace ! The beautiful palace is a popular tourist attraction which has been formally used as an official residence of Japan’s imperial family since the late 19 th century. Although the inner grounds of the palace are not open to the public, you can enjoy taking a refreshing stroll in the outer gardens, including the East Garden. Nijubashi Bridge is an iconic stone bridge serving as an entrance to the inner palace. You can also join the free Imperial Palace tour held daily, to enter and explore the inner grounds with professional guides.

Imperial Palace

Guided Tours Imperial Palace Daily tours at 10am and 1.30pm (in English & Japanese) Free of charge, but registration is required from here

If you are an art lover and interested in Japanese art, Mitsubishi Ichibankan Museum is definitely a must-visit! From JR Tokyo Station it is about a 5min walk to reach the stunning museum which has attracted numerous visitors since its opening in 2010. The red brick building is a reconstruction of the first western-style structure in the Marunouchi area originally founded and owned by Mitsubishi in 1894, when is housed a bank. The museum collection mainly includes Western artworks from the late 19th century and it holds special exhibitions throughout the year. The museum also features a nice English-style garden, where you can enjoy some refreshments. The Café 1894 is a popular place for lunch and dinner among the Japanese.

tourist spot near tokyo station

Mitsubishi Ichigokan Museum 10am – 6pm (※closed on Mondays) Admission varies depending on the exhibition 

Marunouchi Brick Square is a popular shopping complex which opened in 2009. It can be found right next to the Mitsubishi Ichigokan Museum, and offers an exciting shopping experience with about 40 luxury shops including famous fashion brands, great restaurants and cozy cafes. It also boasts a peaceful courtyard featuring a range of seasonal colorful flowers, a lovely fountain and benches, making it an oasis full of lush greenery in the heart of the metropolitan city. A visit to Marunouchi Brick Square can be easily combined with a visit to Tokyo Imperial Palace which is located within walking distance. The area here is a great spot to visit with a cup of coffee for a walk after enjoying lunch at the incredible restaurants!     

Marunouchi Brick Square Shops Weekdays & Saturdays 11am – 9pm Sundays & holidays 11am – 8pm

Restaurants Weekdays & Saturdays 11am – 11pm Sundays & holidays 11am – 10pm

Wadakura Fountain Park is a peaceful and lovely park north of the East Park of Tokyo Imperial Palace. It was originally built in 1961 to celebrate the royal wedding of Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko. In spite of the relatively small size, it is a pleasant oasis to get away from the busy city for a moment. The park is easily accessible from Tokyo Station and you will pass it on your way to Tokyo Imperial Palace. One of the highlights of the park is the various fountains exhibiting a range of water patterns that change continuously and offer an attractive view along with beautiful flowers all year round. The park is accessible 24 hrs and offers wonderful photo ops for photographers at night. The city’s flickering lights and the peaceful park are extra scenic and romantic at night.

Tokyo station area

Wadakura Fountain Park Open 24 hours

National Museum of Modern Art is one of the most famous art museums in Tokyo , also known by the English acronym MOMAT. The museum opened in 1952 as Japan’s first national art museum. It is located in Kitanomaru Garden , the northern part of the outer gardens of Tokyo Imperial Palace. The museum has a great collection of impressive art works and masterpieces by both modern Japanese and overseas artists from the early 20th century to the present day. Even if you are not an art-lover, this museum is still worth visiting. At the ‘room with a view’ you can enjoy some beautiful views of the Imperial Palace Gardens or enjoy a coffee at one of the restaurants/cafes. While the museum is actually closer to Takebashi Station, a walk from Tokyo Station will take you through several (historic) sights on your way like the Wadakura Fountain Park. The area is also known as one of the best places to watch the beautiful cherry blossom in spring . The nearby Chidorigafuchi Moat, where you can rent the iconic swan boats, is one of the best places to watch sakura in Tokyo .

National Museum of Modern Art  10am – 5pm (until 8pm on Friday and Saturday) (※closed on Mondays) Admission fee ¥500 (adult), free admission for those under age 18 

Our final destination is Nihonbashi , a popular tourist attraction full of exciting experiences for everyone. While it is often described as an urbanized business and shopping center in guidebooks, this is actually where traditional and modern Japan co-exist in harmony. Next to the modern highrise, you can find traditional Japanese shops selling goods like knives and traditional sweets for hundreds of years! Nihonbashi Bridge is a symbolic structure that was completed in the Edo Period (1603- 1868) as the starting point of Japan’s five major roads that connected the entire country. Board a cruise tour from Nihonbashi Pier, or try a great number of dining options, including traditional Japanese restaurants serving sushi or fresh eel dishes. Head to Coredo Muromachi, a shopping and entertainment hub where you can enjoy tax-free shopping and get traditional Japanese experiences such as kimono wearing class!

Nihonbashi

Most of the tourist attractions above can be found within walking distance, or even directly connected to Tokyo Station. Each of them are great places to spend an enjoyable time while you are waiting for trains, or wandering around the station. Can you easily spend a couple of hours in the area around Tokyo Station, there are many things to see and do and the contrasting scenery formed by modern highrise and the old buildings is a fascinating sight. The green scenery is also a good place to watch cherry blossom in spring or the autumn foliage in autumn. We hope you will enjoy these must visit places at the heart of Tokyo!

Japan Wonder Travel is a travel agency that offers guided tours throughout Japan.  From private walking tours to delicious Food and Drink tours, we can help you organize the best tours just for you! If you want to explore Japan and learn more about the history and backstories of each area you are visiting, our knowledgeable and friendly English speaking guides will happily take you to the best spots!  In addition, we can provide you with any assistance you may need for your upcoming trip to Japan, so please feel free to contact us if you have any questions or need some help! 

▶ Tokyo Tsukiji Fish Market Food and Drink Tour Explore the most lively and popular fish market in Tokyo and try some of the local’s favorite street foods and sake with one of our friendly and knowledgeable English speaking guides! 

tsukiji tour

▶ Tokyo 1–Day Highlights Private Walking Tour (8 Hours) There’s no better way to explore an area than taking a tour with a knowledgeable local guide. You will have the chance to learn about the history and interesting background stories of Tokyo, as well as discover some hidden gems which can be hard to do without a guide.

Asakusa Tokyo private tour

▶ Mt. Fuji Day Trip Bus Tour from Tokyo Experience the breathtaking views of Mt. Fuji by visiting the highlights of the area on our guided sightseeing bus tour! Departing from Shinjuku in central Tokyo, you can travel comfortably to all of the best spots in the area by bus.

mount fuji chureito pagoda

▶ Kyoto Private Full Day Walking Tour On this full-day private tour of Kyoto, you will be able to see the highlights of Kyoto in just one day and at the same time develop a deeper understanding of both the culture of the area and Japan as a whole.

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[Tokyo] The Best Things to Do around Tokyo Station

tourist spot near tokyo station

Explore Tokyo’s captivating history and modern charm at the iconic Tokyo Station, a masterpiece by Kingo Tatsuno in 1914, nestled in the vibrant Chiyoda Ward. Adjacent to the Imperial Palace Grounds in the Marunochi business district, this railway hub symbolizes architectural magnificence.

A testament to resilience, the eastern extension emerged after the 1923 Tokyo earthquake, creating a colossal complex with Marunouchi to the west and Yaesu to the east, housing a vibrant mix of shops and entertainment venues.

The 2013 restoration revived the dome and exterior, inviting exploration of the enchanting dome interior adorned with flower decorations and Chinese zodiac reliefs. The North Dome hosts the Tokyo Station Gallery, showcasing five annual exhibitions of modern art.

Wander the historical Marunochi side, echoing the elegance of the Meiji era. Marunouchi, a commercial hub and historical gem, borders Tokyo Station and the Imperial Palace, transporting you to the Edo period’s thriving business center.

Yanosuke Iwasaki’s vision in the Meiji period shaped Marunochi into Japan’s first modern business district. Stroll Marunouchi Naka Dori Street, a tree-lined avenue adorned with outdoor art, boutiques, and cafes, creating a meticulously curated cityscape.

Nearby, the Imperial Palace on the original Edo Castle grounds, a regal touch to Tokyo’s landscape since 1457, served as the Tokugawa shoguns’ power seat from 1603 to 1867. Post-Meiji Restoration, it became the Imperial Family’s residence, with the Tokyo Imperial Palace emerging in 1888 from the original castle’s ashes.

Though few original castle buildings remain, formidable stone walls scattered throughout poignantly remind us of its grandeur. Tokyo Station and the Imperial Palace weave a captivating narrative, seamlessly blending history, culture, and modernity, inviting visitors on a mesmerizing journey through time.

Marunouchi Ekimae Square (東京駅丸の内駅前広場)

Marunouchi Ekimae Square in Tokyo, completed in 2017, enhances the historic Tokyo Station’s elegance. Divided into three areas, it includes the tranquil Marunouchi Central Square, bustling Transportation Square, and charming Marunouchi Brick Square. The square harmoniously blends tradition and modernity, offering a picturesque environment with diverse functions, including a shopping and dining complex. Accessible by various train lines, it serves as a gateway to Tokyo’s landmarks like the Imperial Palace and Ginza, making it a popular destination for locals and tourists alike.

[Tokyo] Marunouchi Ekimae Square (東京駅丸の内駅前広場): Tokyo’s Timeless Fusion of History and Elegance

Kokyo Gaien National Garden (皇居外苑)

Kokyo Gaien National Garden, spanning 1.15 million square meters in Tokyo, is a masterpiece blending history, culture, and natural beauty. It includes the Imperial Palace Plaza, Kitanomaru District, and 12 moats. Highlights include the iconic Nijubashi Bridge, a statue of Kusunoki Masashige, and Wadakura Fountain Park. With a history dating back to the 15th century, the garden features well-preserved historic structures. Modern attractions like the fountain park offer a serene escape. Free to the public, the garden provides a perfect mix of tradition and modernity, easily accessible by public transport. Don’t miss this hidden gem for a dose of Japanese culture, history, and nature.

[Tokyo] Kokyo Gaien National Garden (皇居外苑): Japan’s Enchanting Tapestry of Nature, History, and Culture

The East Gardens of the Imperial Palace (皇居東御苑)

The East Gardens of the Imperial Palace, situated a 5-minute walk from Otemachi and Takebashi subway stations, span 210,000 square meters. Accessible through three gates, the gardens feature the Sannomaru Shozokan museum showcasing imperial collections. Highlights include the Ninomaru Garden with Yama-boshi dogwood trees, guardhouses like Doshin-bansho and Hyakunin-bansho, and historical sites like the Remains of Edo Castle, O-oku women’s quarters, Oku Corridor, and Tenshu-dai. Visitors can climb Tenshu-dai for panoramic views and appreciate the Fujimi-yagura from a closer distance.

[Tokyo] The East Gardens of the Imperial Palace (皇居東御苑)

Ote-mon Gate (大手門)

The Otemon Gate, a significant entrance to the old Edo Castle, is a remarkable structure with a square-shaped turret and an earth-paved bridge. Designed for heavy security, it leads to a “masugata” gathering area with defensive features. Serving as the primary gateway for daimyos during ceremonies, the gate symbolizes the grandeur of Edo Castle. Despite historical events and fires, the present-day Otemon Gate at the Tokyo Imperial Palace remains resilient since its reconstruction in 1967. A witness to history, it’s an Important Cultural Property of Japan, offering visitors a glimpse into Japan’s past and cultural heritage. Accessible by train or bus, admission is free, and it’s a popular destination for tourists exploring Edo Castle’s ruins and the East Imperial Gardens.

[Tokyo] Ote-mon Gate (大手門)

Nijubashi Bridge (二重橋)

The Nijubashi Bridge, near Tokyo Metro Sakuradamon, Hibiya, and Nijubashi stations, spans the Imperial Palace moat. Officially referring to the iron Seimon-tetsubashi Bridge, it dates back to the Edo Period, originally constructed as a wooden bridge named “Nishinomaru Gejobashi.” Rebuilt in 1888 as an iron bridge, it adopted its current appearance in 1964 with advanced anti-rust technologies. Though not regularly open to the public, it symbolizes Japan, featuring graceful architecture and providing picturesque views of the palace grounds. The bridges hold cultural significance, representing the imperial institution’s continuity and modernization. Visitors can view them from Koyo Gaien after a short walk from Otemachi Station or Nijubashimae Station, or join guided tours of the Imperial Palace.

[Tokyo] Nijubashi Bridge (二重橋)

Chidori-ga-fuchi Moat (千鳥ヶ淵)

Chidori-ga-fuchi Green Way, a serene 700-meter promenade in Tokyo, offers a historical escape along the Chidori-ga-fuchi Moat, originally built for Edo Castle’s water reserves. Spring brings the magic of cherry blossoms, transforming the area into a pink paradise. Boat rentals, available from March to November, provide a unique experience amidst blooming cherry trees. Don’t miss the Chiyoda Sakura Festival, illuminating the blossoms at night. The moat, once part of Edo Castle’s defense, holds historical significance and serves as a peaceful retreat. Easily accessible by train or bus, it’s open year-round, with boat rentals during the specified season.

[Tokyo] Chidori-ga-fuchi Moat (千鳥ヶ淵): The Cherry Blossom Paradise

Chidori-ga-fuchi Park (千鳥ヶ淵公園)

Chidori-ga-fuchi Park, located near Kudanshita Station in Tokyo, offers a breathtaking cherry blossom viewing experience with a 700-meter-long path surrounded by 170 cherry blossom trees. The park’s unique charm includes benches for a forest bath, complemented by yellow rapeseed flowers from February to May. Adjacent Kitanomaru Park provides historical insights with 230 cherry trees. The park’s name, meaning “plover moat,” reflects its historical connection to Edo Castle. Whether a nature lover or history buff, Chidori-ga-fuchi Park is a must-visit, especially during cherry blossom season, offering a festive and romantic atmosphere. Boat rentals provide a serene view of this green space along the Imperial Palace moat. Easily accessible by train, it’s an ideal destination in Tokyo.

[Tokyo] Chidori-ga-fuchi Park (千鳥ヶ淵公園): A Breathtaking Cherry Blossom Haven

Yasukuni Shrine (靖国神社)

The Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo is a Shinto shrine and war memorial founded in 1869 by Emperor Meiji. It commemorates over 2.5 million individuals, including soldiers, workers, and animals, who supported Japan in various conflicts. Despite controversy over its association with past militarism, the shrine provides an opportunity to learn about Japan’s complex history and pay respects to those who sacrificed for the country. Enshrining not only human souls but also animals and war-related objects, the shrine features a museum displaying over 100,000 war-related items. The surrounding gardens offer a peaceful environment for reflection on the shrine’s significance. Despite controversy, the Yasukuni Shrine remains a significant cultural site reflecting Japan’s history and complexities surrounding war responsibility and reconciliation.

[Tokyo] Yasukuni Shrine (靖国神社): Honoring Sacrifice and Reflecting Japan’s Complex History

Wadakura Fountain Park (和田倉噴水公園)

Wadakura Fountain Park, situated in the Wadakura section of Kokyo Gaien National Garden, features a stunning 8.5-meter fountain, a 30-meter artificial waterfall, and historic Edo-period structures. Constructed to commemorate imperial marriages, the park embodies Japanese culture, emphasizing nature and harmony. Its minimalist design with concrete, water, and light creates a serene ambiance, symbolized by a chrysanthemum-shaped fountain. Submerged LED lights enhance day and night views, with seasonal attractions like cherry blossom viewing and autumn foliage. The park hosts an illumination event from late November to late December, offering a cultural and natural retreat in the heart of Tokyo.

[Tokyo] Wadakura Fountain Park (和田倉噴水公園): A Tranquil Oasis in Tokyo

Hibiya Park (日比谷公園)

Hibiya Park, established in 1903, is a lush 40-acre green space in the heart of Tokyo, offering a glimpse into Japanese culture and history. Formerly a military training ground and feudal lords’ dwelling, it features a rose garden, two Western-style flower gardens, and a pond surrounded by cherry blossoms and ginkgo trees. The park includes the Gothic-style Shisei Kaikan building, the 500-year-old Risky Ginkgo tree, and the Hibiya Open-Air Concert Hall. A hub for sightseeing and events, it attracts both locals and tourists with its diverse offerings, accessible by Tokyo Metro or Toei Mita Line. Admission is usually free.

[Tokyo] Hibiya Park (日比谷公園): Where Japanese History and Natural Beauty Unite

Kitanomaru National Garden (北の丸公園)

Kitanomaru National Garden, a 200,000 square meter oasis near Tokyo’s bustling city, offers a tranquil escape with evergreen forests, diverse trees, and over 200 cherry trees. Momijiyama Hill showcases vibrant maple trees in autumn. With a historical background dating back to the Tokugawa shogunate era and connections to Edo Castle, the park features preserved gates, sections of the moat, and cultural sites like Nippon Budokan and National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo. Popular for cherry blossom viewing in spring and autumn foliage, it is easily accessible from Kudanshita Station, making it an ideal retreat for history enthusiasts, nature lovers, and culture enthusiasts alike.

[Tokyo] Kitanomaru National Garden (北の丸公園): Tokyo’s Tranquil Nature Retreat
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  • Imperial Palace & Tokyo Station
  • Tokyo Station

Tokyo Station 東京駅

Tokyo Station

1-9 Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo-to

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Tokyo Station's traditional exterior hides a wealth of modern shopping and dining

  • Snapping a photo in front of the original Meiji-era building, especially when lit up at night
  • Hundreds of different bento box meals for sale near the bullet train ticket gates
  • The maze of underground souvenir shops and restaurant streets to suit any taste

How to Get There

Tokyo Station is a central hub for many trains and metro lines.

Tokyo Station can be reached by various JR trains, including the Yamanote Line, Chuo Line, Sobu Line and Keihin-Tohoku Line. For those using Tokyo Metro lines, the Marunouchi Line is convenient. You can also reach Tokyo Station via long underground passageways linked to nearby Otemachi Station, a stop on the Tozai, Chiyoda, Hanzomon, and Mita metro lines. The shinkansen bullet train terminal serves as a gateway to and from other cities in Japan.

There are two Japan Rail Pass Exchange counters in the station, one by the Marunouchi North Exit and the other by the Yaesu North Exit. Both are open from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.

tourist spot near tokyo station

Amsterdam meets Tokyo

The iconic red and white brick design of the original station building was inspired by Amsterdam's Central Station. Sadly, it was damaged during World War II but has been restored to its former splendor thanks to a major renovation project finished in 2012. The elegant Neo-Baroque inspired ceilings under the large domes are one of the highlights, their warm yellows and unusual eagle and zodiac designs giving the space a grand feeling.

tourist spot near tokyo station

Elegant arched domes of Tokyo Station

Heading underground for fantastic shopping and food

Beneath the station, you will find dozens of underground passages, shopping streets, dining areas, galleries and more. You could spend a whole afternoon exploring "Tokyo Station City" without ever coming out above ground. Foodies will want to check out the offerings at Ramen Street, Kurobei Yokocho, and Kitchen Street.

tourist spot near tokyo station

Pop culture fans will be delighted with Tokyo Character Street, filled with shops selling official Japanese character goods ranging from a Pokemon Center and Ghibli store to ones for classic Shonen Jump anime series and the latest popular characters.

Tokyo Station is a great spot to find Japanese souvenirs, sweets, and other goods, with options for a whole range of budgets.

Rainy-day haven

tourist spot near tokyo station

Tired after walking around the city? Treat yourself to a massage or manicure in the fancy department stores or little salons of the Yaesu Shopping Mall, also known as Yaechika. Bibliophiles will find a second home in the foreign language book section of Maruzen, housed in the Marunouchi Oazo complex in front of the Marunouchi North Exit.

tourist spot near tokyo station

Around Tokyo Station

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27 Best Things to Do in Tokyo

By Melinda Joe and Anna Chittenden

Cherry Blossom And River In Tokyo Japan

Deciding the best things to do in Tokyo depends on how much time you have—and for your sake, we hope you have a month. The city’s streets can feel like a game of soccer played at hyper speed, while calmer attractions range from temples, museums , gardens, origami classes, and bohemian sojourns. This city has more than enough going on to put you in a tizzy, so a words of advice: Arrive with a game plan and prepare to get lost along the way, in a good way. Here, the very best things to do in Tokyo.

Read our complete Tokyo travel guide here .

This gallery has been updated with new information since its original publish date.

Sensoji Tokyo

Senso-ji Arrow

Tokyo may not have as many temples as Kyoto, but Senso-ji isn’t the capital city’s most popular just by default. The atmosphere alone here is one for the bucket list. Senso-ji, the temple itself, is at the end of the shopping street, while a recently renovated five-story pagoda stands to the left (ranking in as the second tallest pagoda in Japan). Japanese visitors flutter around a large cauldron in front of the temple where incense burned inside is said to benefit good health. Travelers keen to avoid crowds should arrive early, but even tourists that are remotely interested in Japanese culture will find something to appreciate here.

An alley.

Harmonica Yokocho Arrow

This clutch of narrow alleys, a short walk from the north exit of JR Kichijoji station, is stuffed to the gills with hole-in-the wall eateries. A yellow sign marks the entrance to Harmonica Yokocho, which takes its name from the layout of the vendors, slotted cheek-to-jowl along the passageways like the reeds in a harmonica. The atmospheric network of lanes started out as a post-war flea market in the 1940s, but the area underwent a transformation in the 90s when bustling bars and restaurants made their entrance onto the scene. It has a laid-back and hyper-local feel, especially during the daytime, when you’ll find fishmongers and traditional sweets makers plying their trades.

Tokyo Skytree

Tokyo Skytree Arrow

Topping off at 2,080 feet, the Tokyo Skytree is the tallest tower (that's tower, not building) in the world. From the broadcast tower’s 360-degree observation decks, the whole city—its striking skyscrapers and neon intersections—looks like a magical circuit board. It’s a major tourist attraction and a ticket isn’t cheap (up to ¥3,400, or $25, for combo tickets), but even if you don’t pay to go inside, there’s no denying that the Tokyo Skytree brought the skyline to a whole new level. Depending on where you’re staying, it can be an out-of-the-way trip to eastern Tokyo (luckily, a train station gets you right near the entrance). Families with children will enjoy the experience—especially the speedy elevator rides—as will anyone that loves a jaw-dropping view.

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Koganeyu Arrow

Sleek design, a DJ booth, and craft beer on tap: The newly refurbished Koganeyu functions as a lively standing bar and community events space, but the main reason to visit this 89-year-old establishment is to immerse yourself in Tokyo’s sento (public sauna) culture. A crowdfunded renovation has transformed the space into a contemporary sento with four pools, a sauna, and an outdoor bath. Bathing areas for men and women are separated by a 2.2-meter partial wall, while a mural depicting Mount Fuji stretches across both areas like a scroll. You can purchase tickets from the vending machine at the entrance; a 90-minute bathing session costs about $3.50 for adults, $2.70 for students, and $1.30 for children. After emerging from the baths, relax with a glass of craft beer brewed especially for Koganeyu, or try a homemade ginger highball.

A Japanese teapot sits silhouetted at a table.

Sakurai Tea Experience Arrow

Copper and wood greet you inside this minimalist sanctuary dedicated to sado, the Japanese “way of tea.” A small retail space filled with glass jars containing 30 varieties of green tea conceals an intimate eight-seat cafe. Founder Shinya Sakurai studied for 14 years to become a master, and his modern take on tea ceremony is meditative and illuminating. As Sakurai prepares the infusions behind an L-shaped wooden counter, a continuous stream of water flows from a copper tap—a symbol of purification. Gyokuro, a luxurious variety of green tea grown in the shade, is the specialty here. Sakurai travels the country to select the leaves, which he roasts daily in-house. The tasting flight for ¥4,800 (about $35) is the best introduction to the range of teas on offer.

Shibuya Crossing

Shibuya Crossing Arrow

Anyone remotely impressed that Tokyo is the most populated city in the world should visit the world’s busiest intersection at Shibuya Crossing. Massive video screens flashing advertisements tower above every corner as black-suited salarymen, wide-eyed tourists, and bag-toting shoppers wait and cross in concert. The feeling is oddly soothing, a reminder that whatever our disparate paths in life, they all have a tendency to cross at one time or another. The best time to go is at dusk, one of the scramble’s peak times and in its most flattering light. The Shibuya Scramble Square tower above Shibuya station offers a birds’ eye view of the famous crossing, along with panoramic vistas of the city from the Shibuya Sky rooftop observatory, perched 230 meters above street level.

Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden Tokyo

Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden Arrow

Fancy a stroll in a Japanese garden? Get that and more at Shinjuku Gyoen. In addition to native, traditional gardens, the 144-acre park pockets French Formal and English Landscape gardens, all of which are worth the modest entrance fee. Landmarks are stunning and impossible to forget, like a Taiwan Pavilion perched along a serene pond. Formerly an imperial garden, it became a national garden after World War II—so you can trust that this precious plot is always beautifully maintained. Don’t miss cherry blossom season.

Kappabashi Street Tokyo Shopping

Kappabashi Street Arrow

Kappabashi Street, a district in between Ueno and Asakusa, isn’t so much a food destination as it is a food adjacent destination: While it’s devoted to the restaurant industry, fresh food isn’t why folks come. Instead, the street is a chef’s dream of restaurant supply stores that are known best for sampuru , replicas of food dishes that are part of a century-old craft—and are up for grabs. And, because it’s more trade-focused than tourist-focused, the prices can be somewhat economical. Have any curious cooks in the family? This district is their souvenir heaven.

Shaved ice Azuki to Kouri Tokyo

Azuki to Kouri Arrow

The clean-lined, slate-grey interior of this kakigori ice specialist sets off the ebullient shaved ice creations of pâtissier Miho Horio. Formerly of two-Michelin-starred restaurant Florilege, Horio is one of the young chefs elevating the sweet treat to new heights of refinement. She carefully adjusts the blade of her ice machine to shave blocks of ice—made with spring water from Nikko, north of Tokyo—into fluffy, feathery flakes. Shaping the shavings into a delicate mound, she adds fresh fruit and toppings such as homemade syrups, compotes, and foams. Her signature parfait showcases sweet azuki red beans—the classic kakigori topping for which the café is named—paired with cream and flecks of meringue. Seasonal offerings include salted cherry blossoms with fresh strawberries in spring, and blood orange dusted with grated Amazonian cacao in early summer.

Yoyogi Park Tokyo

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Yoyogi Park is one of the most amusing parks in Tokyo. Its 134 acres sprawl right in Shibuya, a short skip from Harajuku , and bustle with picnics and performers. The northern side is lush, with clean walkways along expansive, grassy lawns where locals and tourists spread under the shade of Japanese Zelkova trees, and gather around a large pond. Spot impromptu badminton team swinging racquets, a drum circle tapping away at the bongo, or amateur dancers following along to the beat.

Yayoi Kusama Museum Tokyo

Yayoi Kusama Museum Arrow

In a suburban part of Shinjuku, a smooth white building rises five stories high—a museum completely devoted to the works of Yayoi Kusama . The building looks slim, but it houses a bulk of the larger-than-life and avant-garde artist’s pieces, including an installation of her “infinity room” series (an Instagram sensation which, in the past, drew hundreds of thousands of visitors in stateside exhibitions) to polka-dotted paintings and sculptures. The museum changes its exhibition two times a year, and as it’s still relatively new, it’s only cracked the surface of the prolific artist’s work.

Japanese tea ceremony scenes at traditional Japanese room

Kuge Crafts Arrow

The traditional technique of mending pottery with lacquer sprinkled with gold dust, kintsugi is an art form unto itself. The practice, which dates back to the 15th century, is alive and well at Kuge Crafts, a ceramics studio in the quiet Shin-Koenji neighborhood of western Tokyo. Run by a family of artisans—Yoshiichiro and Yoshiko Kuge, together with their son, Shu—the atelier transforms broken cups and dishes into singular works of art and offers two-hour kintsugi lessons (¥8,000, or about $59) for learners of all levels. The workshop will provide all the materials; you can bring your own damaged vessel for repair or ask them to prepare a piece for you to work on.

Sumo Stadium Tokyo

Sumo at Ryogoku Kokugikan Arrow

Only three of six official grand sumo tournaments happen in Tokyo, all at Ryogoku Kokugikan. The stadium houses over 11,000 eager fans under its green, pavilion-style roof. Official tournaments last just over two weeks each, which means Ryogoku Kokugikan sometimes hosts other events (boxing, for example). But sumo is the arena’s feature attraction, and if you’re hoping to see sumo in Tokyo, this is where to find it. Tamari seats, which are those immediately surrounding the ring, are the most coveted—and virtually impossible to score. But the next series of rows, box seats, are as close as you can get. Box seats are top-dollar, but little more than rows of tatami mats lined with red square cushions (with no backs) sold in groups of four—so cozy up, and pay up (¥380,00, or about $279, for a box). There are proper stadium seats along the second-floor mezzanine, but the thrill of witnessing this traditional Japanese sport up close is all about getting comfortable with the floor.

The Bellwood Tokyo

The Bellwood Arrow

Modeled after an early 20th-century Japanese coffee house, this swanky watering hole is fitted with modern-retro touches like a stained glass panel bearing the bar’s name, bookended by images of Mount Fuji and a martini under the moon. The main space is great for after-work drinks or late-night tipples, but the bar recently opened a glass-encased private room to host a series of food-and-cocktail pairing experiments. Witty twists on classic cocktails are prepared with flair. Start light with the Kome Tonic, made with rice-based shochu, then explore the seasonal menu: Tango Mule made with gin and Fernet Branca laced with roasted mate, or the Okushibu Fashioned with bourbon, kinako soy powder and a hint of bitter mugmort.

Nihon Minkaen Japan Openair Folk House Museum

Nihon Minka-en Japan Open-air Folk House Museum Arrow

Though only 20 minutes by train from central Tokyo, the Nihon Minka-En Japan Open-Air Folk House Museum, located in a suburb of neighboring Kawasaki City, feels a world—and several centuries—away. The sprawling grounds are home to 25 marvelously preserved Edo-era homes relocated from all over the Japanese countryside, spanning an array of styles from farmhouses to samurai houses and includes a shrine, water mill and kabuki stage. Don’t miss the traditional indigo dyeing workshop in the middle of the park houses a small shop where you can find indigo-dyed everything, from socks and sweaters to handkerchiefs and masks.

A interior of a restaurant.

Koffee Mameya Kakeru Arrow

Don't expect your average cup of joe at Koffee Mameya Kakeru, housed in a renovated warehouse in the Shirakawa coffee district in eastern Tokyo. Beyond the sleek glass facade, the interior designed by art director Tomohiro Kato and architect Yosuke Hayashi features a massive oak structure built around the artfully arranged coffee shelves. A rectangular wooden frame encases a three-sided stone counter built around three black tables where the baristas display their skills. Coffee maestro and founder Eiichi Kumimoto launched Koffee Mameya Kakeru to go deep into the world of the brew and push the boundaries of the drink's potential. The menu showcases seasonal varieties, but the omakase-style coffee tasting courses (including a range of cold and milk brews, mocktails, and lattes) take center stage, offering a fascinating journey through the diverse flavors and artistry of coffee. Coffee cocktail champion Akira Zushi dazzles with flair bartending skills and innovative cocktails like the milk brew blended with hop-accented jasmine tea and lemon, finished with a spritz of prickly ash water.

Oedo Antique Market Tokyo

Oedo Antique Market Arrow

Oedo Antique Market is a marvelous outdoor fair held near Tokyo Station twice a month, with stalls selling wonderful antique and vintage wares. Hundreds of independent stallholders set up shop to sell their one-of-a-kind objects. There isn’t a huge number of antique or vintage homeware shops in Tokyo—so if you’re looking for old, interesting, and unique Japanese items for your home, this is the place to come. The items on sale at Oedo are completely one-off and unique. You’d be hard pressed to find a permanent shop in Tokyo that has the choice and style that you’ll find here. For first dibs, come earlier in the day.

Former Asakura Residence Tokyo

Kyu Asakura House Arrow

Built in 1919, the former residence of government official Torajiro Asakura is a marvelously preserved example of traditional Japanese architecture tucked into Tokyo’s bustling Daikanyama district. For ¥100 (about 73 cents), you can wander through the building’s stately wooden corridors, tatami-floored rooms, and beautifully manicured grounds. The suginoma (cedar rooms) on the west side of the structure offer postcard-perfect views of the Japanese garden—particularly in the autumn, when the maple trees blaze with color. One of the city’s best-kept secrets, the property is an oasis of calm. It’s the perfect place to escape the crowds for an hour or two and contemplate the passing of time.

Nakameguro Tokyo Neighborhood

Nakameguro Arrow

It’s okay to visit the artsy neighborhood, Nakameguro, just to see its seasonal appeal as one of the most picture-perfect spots for cherry blossoms in spring. However, stick around these charming streets and you’ll find a hip collection of independent cafes and boutiques that offer a laid-back alternative to the city’s buzzing hubs. Sakura trees hug the Meguro River in Nakameguro’s center, blossoming as they lean over the sloped, canal-like walls surrounding the water. Once you’ve taken a moment to smell the blossoms (and fill your phone with pictures), you’ll find an array of independent boutiques and cafes branching off along narrow streets in either direction. Head to the corner-side Onibus Coffee, which serves single-origin espresso, and stop at SML, a boutique stocking delightful crafts (especially ceramics) made by Japanese artists. 

A shopping complex.

Nakano Broadway Arrow

A Tokyo mecca for anime- and manga-loving otaku subculture fans, the Nakano Broadway is a multi-story shopping arcade that has become a hub for niche collectors of all stripes. When it first opened in 1966, the complex epitomized the spirit of future-perfect economic optimism sparked by the Tokyo Olympics. Competition from newer shopping malls emptied its corridors of fancy boutiques in the 80s, before the Broadway reinvented itself as a center for used manga and anime models in the 90s. More than 300 tiny outlets are crammed into the aging edifice’s bottom five floors, offering everything from vintage Godzilla and Astroboy figurines to designer watches and creepy dolls galore.

Isetan Tokyo

Isetan Arrow

Isetan is Tokyo’s best—and most famous—department store; its history dates back to 1886, when it started as a kimono shop. The sprawling flagship in Shinjuku is spread out over nine floors, each offering something special. There’s a big fashion focus, with local Japanese brands sitting beside international names. Don’t miss a visit to the wonderful food hall on B1, which sells a variety of Japanese snacks and goodies, including beautifully prepared bento boxes for lunch.

Tsukiji Market Tokyo TTD

Tsukiji Market Arrow

In October 2018, the world’s largest fish market, Tsukiji, shut down after 83 years and re-opened in two distinct parts. At the original location, it’s pretty much business as usual, with street-food stalls serving up everything from seared tuna to uni sandwiches in squid-ink sticky buns. Just down the road at Toyosu Market , meanwhile, you can taste fresh raw fish in a series of sushi bars and peek in on the auctions (formerly held at Tsukiji) and live fish sales from a second-story viewing station. You can also tour a large green space on the rooftop, which affords views of the Tokyo skyline.

An interior of a store.

Heiwa Doburoku Brewery Kabutocho Arrow

This simple but stylish Wakayama-based sake brewpub in Tokyo makes clever use of a corner space in Kabutocho, the recently hip neighborhood near the Tokyo Stock Exchange building. As the name suggests, the bar specializes in doburoku, a rustic style of unfiltered and lightly fermented sake characterized by its thick texture. Previously outlawed for taxation reasons, the traditional brew is making a comeback, appearing on menus at Tokyo's trendiest restaurants and bars. Large windows, pale wood fixtures, and a curved counter surrounding a small open kitchen give the bar an open and airy feel. The menu lists dry-hopped and aged doburoku, varieties made with ground adzuki red beans or black beans, and a few seasonal styles flavored with fruits or herbs. But the best place to start is with the original, plain doburoku, a thick and yogurty brew with a touch of fruity fizz. Brewer Heiwa Shuzo's excellent craft beers are served on tap (we love the golden ale infused with fragrant sansho prickly ash peppercorns), and the bar offers a nice selection of the brewery's clear, award-winning sake.

Japan Tokyo Museum Nezu

Nezu Museum Arrow

This serene museum in the Aoyama district, redesigned by celebrated architect Kengo Kuma, is a contemporary temple for traditional art. A long, covered outdoor path alongside bamboo-clad walls serves as a minimalist entrance, but once inside, double-height interiors and glass walls stretch over 40,000 square feet while keeping the experience intimate. And while the museum mixes contemporary design and traditional art on the inside—over 7,400 pieces—the outside counts, too: The property is home to a stunning private garden that’s worth the visit all on its own. The bulk of the museum’s art was once the private collection of Nezu Kaichirō, the president of Japan’s Tobu Railway. Since the midcentury, the collection grew and now comprises over 7,400 pieces.

Bohemian Tokyo in Shimokitazawa Shopping Store

Bohemian Tokyo in Shimokitazawa Arrow

Only one express stop away from the brighter-than-bright energy of Shibuya, Shimokita (what locals call Shimokitazawa) is like turning down the volume and switching to an acoustic track. It might embrace its bohemian style—with vintage stores on seemingly every block—but it doesn’t lose that unmistakable, sophisticated Japanese style in the process. Sift through secondhand shops, sip coffee, and repeat.

MonzenNakacho Tokyo

Monzen-Nakacho Arrow

The old-school neighborhood of Monzen-Nakacho—known as “Mon-Naka” among locals—has retained its colorful, salt-of-the-earth shitamachi (downtown) atmosphere since the Edo era (1603-1868). Two main draws are the stately Tomioka Hachiman Shrine and the Fukagawa Fududo temple, where you can hear the sounds of drumming and chanting from the temple’s fire ceremony, held five times a day. These days, hipster coffee shops and natural wine boîtes nestle against traditional shops selling pickles, Japanese confections, and old-timey delicacies like tsukudani—bits of seafood long-simmered in soy sauce and sugar. It’s a terrific place to spend a lazy afternoon wandering the cobbled streets and alleyways en route to the Museum of Contemporary Art in neighboring Kiba. But at night, the neighborhood comes alive with an array of reasonably priced eating and drinking spots.

teamLab borderless Tokyo

teamLab Borderless Arrow

With the first iteration of Borderless in Odaiba, the art collective Teamlab created an endlessly Instagrammable, sumptuous and surreal museum dedicated to multi-sensory digital art. Opened in 2018, the facility, which set the world record for the most visited museum dedicated to a single artist, closed its doors in 2022. However, Borderless 2.0 is set to relocate to a permanent location in the soon-to-open Azabudai Hills mixed-use complex in central Tokyo in early 2024. Boderless consists of installations that feature constantly morphing patterns and designs that seem to flow seamlessly from room to room in a maze-like space. Updated versions of some of the museum’s previous works will be on display, as well as several new installations: a room filled with hundreds of multicolored lights that run along tracks continuously and a series of interactive “light sculptures,” to name a few.

tourist spot near tokyo station

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The Tokyo EDITION, Ginza

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Traveling Tokyo with Baby/Kids? I am raising kids in central Tokyo and becoming "Tokyo's baby/kids-friendly place master". I would like to introduce useful informations for mom/dad and baby/toddler/kids from my experience. Hope all your family enjoy Japan!!

tourist spot near tokyo station

10 Best things to do around Tokyo Station with family

If you visit Tokyo Station area, you have a lots of fun thing to do with family – Let me show you what.

Watch Japanese trains coming into Tokyo station

There is train observation spot right in front of Tokyo Station. Open to public, from 11:00-21:00. Try if your kids love trains.

More about —> Free train observation deck near Tokyo Station [ KITTE ]

tourist spot near tokyo station

Peek stuffed specimen at free-museum

There is mini museum on same KITTE building – also admission free.

It’s academic museum of Tokyo-University, casually you can enter to see zoological / botanical specimen.

More about —> INTER MEDIA THEQUE Museum @ KITTE near Tokyo Station

tourist spot near tokyo station

Find unique souvenirs inside Tokyo Station

Tokyo Station is not just for transportation – it’s huge shopping complex with full of unique shops.

  • For Kids toys : Tokyo Character Street (Link to details )
  • For General goods or foods : GRANSTA Tokyo (Link to details )

tourist spot near tokyo station

Stroll Marunouchi Street (Pedestrian Paradise)

Marunouchi street is one of my favorite street in Tokyo. Just walk this street, always something nice happened any season.

More about —> Cozy street connecting Tokyo station and Ginza

Marunouchi street

Visit Imperial Palace area

Imperial Palace is about 10-15 min walk from Tokyo station, Marunouchi-side exit.

Of course no one can get inside the moat, but feeling peaceful atmosphere of Imperial Palace is good.

More about —> Picnic at Imperial Palace garden in Tokyo Japan

tourist spot near tokyo station

The 1st Greener Starbucks Japan at Imperial palace outer park is also good stop-by spot.

Starbucks Coffee Kokyo Gaien Wadakura fountain park store (Link to Official website) Address : 3-1 Kokyogaien Chiyoda-ku Tokyo , Japan (Link to Google Map) S

tourist spot near tokyo station

Stop by outdoor playground at Hibiya park

If small children request slide or swing, Hibiya park is the closest playground from Tokyo station.

More about —> Safe & peaceful children’s playground near Imperial Palace [ HIBIYA PARK ]

Hibiya park playground

Hop on Sky Bus for Tokyo sightseeing short tour

You might see cute red two-story tourist buses are running around Central Tokyo. Thats SKY BUS Tokyo, which starts around here.

SKY BUS ( Official Website )

tourist spot near tokyo station

Get on sightseeing bus “HATO BUS”

The most famous sightseeing BUS company in Japan is HATO BUS, the yellow bus. Their start point is in Marunouchi, 3min walk from Tokyo station. They have hundreds of bus tour throughout Japan – check their plan online.

HATO BUS ( Official Website )

tourist spot near tokyo station

Get in the cool architecture in Tokyo

Tokyo International Forum is a multi-purpose exhibition center located near Tokyo station. The glass building shaped like an elongated boat one of the coolest architecture in Tokyo.

And it’s open to public! Anyone can walk up to the upper floor if you are interested in.

Tokyo International Forum ( Official Website ) Address : Tokyo International Forum, 5-1Marunouchi 3 choume,Chiyoda-ku,Tokyo

tourist spot near tokyo station

Find bargain at Japanese Antique Market

If timing fit with your schedule – Oedo Antique Market are held twice a month at Tokyo International Forum.

It’s the Largest outdoor Antique Market in Japan, basically every 1st and 3rd Sundays. (Canceled in case of rain)

Oedo Antique Market ( Official Website ) *Please check recent schedule from official website Every 1st and 3rd Sundays (sometimes may be changed) Closed in case of rain 9:00~16:00 ADMISSION FREE Address : Tokyo International Forum, 5-1Marunouchi 3 choume,Chiyoda-ku,Tokyo

tourist spot near tokyo station

(Winter only) Enjoy Christmas lights !

Marunouchi street is even more beautiful in Christmas season. Enjoy strolling Marunouchi area!

tourist spot near tokyo station

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Parks / Playgrounds for family with kids around Imperial Palace

Peaceful Edo-castle ruin garden (Admission free) Cool shopping complex near imperial palace – [ TOKYO MIDTOWN HIBIYA ] AVATAR ROBOT CAFE in Tokyo [ DAWN CAFE ] Pokemon center in Nihonbashi, Tokyo

tourist spot near tokyo station

Published in Tourist Attractions

  • Christmas lights
  • Hibiya park
  • Imperial palace
  • Japanese Antique Market
  • Marunouchi area
  • Marunouchi Street
  • Oedo Antique Market
  • Sightseeing
  • Sightseeing Bus
  • Tokyo Character Street
  • Tokyo International Forum
  • Tokyo station area
  • Train observation spot in Tokyo

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[ Tokyo Station GRANSTA ] Full of Japanese souvenir & gourmet – Traveling Tokyo with Baby/Kids

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Tokyo Station

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Tokyo Station

With over 3,000 trains passing through every day, Tokyo Station is the busiest station in Japan. It is the fifth-busiest in terms of passengers and even serves as a hub for many regional commuter lines and the Tokyo Metro network. The station covers so much area in fact that it is divided into the Marunouchi and Yaesu sides.

The red brick exterior has survived since its original opening in 1914 and has become a recognizable symbol of Tokyo itself. The plans for the elevated railway line were drawn up in 1889, and since it’s opening, Tokyo Station has seen much history pass by.

Nearby Station

  • Yamanote Line

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North & South Domes

These two dome entrances on the west Marunouchi side feature part original plaster, reinforced and restored alongside relief work completed in the 2012 renovation. Also look out for the eight eagles underneath the dome, and eight Zodiac animals in the surrounding artwork.

Tokyo Station

Designed by architect Tatsuno Kingo, the brick exterior of Tokyo Station was a restrained celebration of the Russo-Japanese War’s costly victory. It has survived bombings from 1945 and seen the assassination of two Japanese prime ministers.

Brick

Bullet Trains

The Tōkaidō (Osaka), Tōhoku (Shin-Aomori), Jōetsu(Niigata) and Nagano Shinkansen bullet train as well as the Hikari and Kodama bullet trains can be found at Tokyo Station. Capable of getting you across Japan in just a few hours. They are truly an engineering feat and something that everyone should experience at least once.

Shinkansen

The GRANSTA in one of Tokyo's biggest underground shopping malls. Featuring a now total of 153 store fronts, there is truly no shortage of goods for you to explore. GRANSTA is where any traveler could find anything they could ever need and is one of Tokyo Stations' most convenient features.

Tokyo Station GRANSTA

Toyko Art Gallery

Founded in 1988, Tokyo Station Art Gallery is a break away from the chaos. Surrounded by the original brick used to build the station, you will find various historical artworks on display. There are also periodic exhibitions that can be enjoyed throughout the year.

First Avenue

First Avenue Tokyo Station is located in JR Tokyo Station just outside the ticket gates. Here you will find a variety of shops consisting of character shops, souvenir shops and the Tokyo Ramen Street. Due to all that you can find and its convenient location next to the station, there are always a crowd of shoppers eager to see what they can find.

Tokyo Station

General Amenities

  • Information Counter
  • Nursing rooms
  • Coin lockers

Payment Method

  • Credit cards accepted

Accessibility

  • Barrier-free access

Tokyo Station is a main station on the Yamanote Line and easily reached from many lines. For the main brick exterior facade head for the Marunouchi Exit.

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Tokyo Station, having just recently finished its exterior remodeling of its Marounuchi side, is the hub of most travel here in Tokyo...

Tokyo Station Celebrates 100 Years!

Tokyo Station Celebrates 100 Years!

Tokyo Station Celebrates 100 Years! To commemorate the 1914 opening, a series of festive events will take place and special li..

Tokyo Station at Night

Tokyo Station at Night

Tokyo Station at Night: One million busy people pass by and through this beautiful, dreamy station every day.

Tokyo Station Reborn: The Marunouchi Renovation

Tokyo Station Reborn: The Marunouchi Renovation

Tokyo Station's evening traffic action is a beautiful view and a time-lapse video of the same is as below.

Past Meets Modernity: Tokyo Station

Past Meets Modernity: Tokyo Station

The photo story explores various aspects of the newly renovated Tokyo Station - from its traditional western architectural style..

History of Tokyo Station

History of Tokyo Station

The reconstruction of Tokyo Station is not just for its appearence, for the original style has much historical significance behind..

Tokyo Station

Tokyo Station is a train station in Marunouchi located just next to the Imperial Palace and Ginza.

Tokyo Ramen Street

Tokyo Ramen Street

Tokyo Ramen Street located inside Tokyo Station houses seven distinctive ramen shops including tsukemen, miso ramen, maze soba and..

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Tokyo Okashi Land & Character St

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Tokyo Station City & First Avenue

Tokyo Station City & First Avenue

When you feel like you've had enough Tokyo's outdoors the indoor streets of Tokyo Station city will welcome you.

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Gundam Café - Tokyo Station [Closed]

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JR Pass Japan

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Soranoiro Nippon at Tokyo Station

Soranoiro Nippon at Tokyo Station

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London X Tokyo Teatime Bus 2021

London X Tokyo Teatime Bus 2021

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  • Get Set For A Road Trip To These 10 Places Near Tokyo And Enjoy A Fascinating Day Trip!

08 Jun 2023

Tokyo is the capital city and has everything under its shed, but there is so much more to explore on the other side of Japan. Don’t you think so? From the mighty mountains which act as a perfect backdrop, to the pristine gardens and beaches which doesn’t fail to surprise its visitors. There are a lot of places near Tokyo which are worth a visit, especially if you have that wandering bug inside you. Just in case you’re planning an exciting road trip from Tokyo, make sure to tick off these places from your bucket list and enjoy vacation outside the metropolis.

10 Best Places Near Tokyo

Here are some of the best places near Tokyo which one must visit if they want to know about the heritage of Japan and also immerse into some surreal views of mountains and panoramic landscapes.

1. Kamakura

Kamakura

Image Source

One of the best and popular places to visit near Tokyo , Kamakura is adorned with all the Kyoto style. From magnificent temples and shrines which brings galore to this little city, there are also some enthralling hiking options. And for the foodie travelers, there are local street food shops which will savour your hungry appetite. The main highlight of Kamakura is the giant Buddha statue where people have to hike through and take a glimpse. Alongside this their beautiful shrines and bamboo forests which covers the place.

Distance From Tokyo : 50 minutes from Tokyo Station

Must Read: These Top Places For Shopping In Tokyo Will Not Burn A Hole In Your Pocket!

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2. Enoshima

Enoshima

For the beach babies, Enoshima is one of the most popular beach resorts near Tokyo which offers a perfect tropical vibe while in Japan. With the view of the sands lying and the stunning islands, this place is a perfect getaway to spend a day in complete relaxation. There are shrines, an old lighthouse and exotic gardens which can be explored by foot. And then there are also some caves which will lead you to a beautiful view to capture. And adding to all the serenity is the relaxing boat ride to the shore.

Distance From Tokyo : 70 minutes from Tokyo Station

Suggested Read: Japan In May: Explore The 10 Most Exciting Activities Japan Offers In May

3. Odawara City

_Odawara City

To witness the closest castle in Tokyo, Odawara is indeed a fascinating day trip from the capital city. This castle has preserved the Edo-period drawings carefully in its premises. Apart from that you can also enjoy time at the fishing port and have a scrumptious lunch of Donburi (rice bowl dish) at the Odawara Fish Market Den. Alongside this, there is a relaxing Tsujimura Botanical Garden which will just complete your day trip from Tokyo.

Distance From Tokyo : 75 minutes from Tokyo Station

Suggested Read: Tokyo In November: From Adventure To Sightseeing The Capital City Has A Lot To Explore!

Kawagoe

Locally known as little Edo, Kawagoe is a beautiful little which has treasured the traditional buildings and a wide range of good and delicious food. From exploring the Kurazukari street and its warehouse buildings made of clay walls and tiles. Apart from this don’t miss out the warehouses which have been renovated into cafes and restaurants. These food joints serve the traditional lunch sets along with Eel which is their speciality.

Distance From Tokyo : 1 hour from Tokyo station

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Nikko

Nikko is a hidden treasure near Tokyo which is a perfect getaway for the weekend getaways and also for running out from the busy day rush. This place is known for its magnificent sceneries along with temples and shrines. Apart from that, there are some cultural spots which combine the beauty of nature along with heritage. The Toshugu shrine is the main highlight of this place which is dedicated to the founder of Tokugawa Shogunate. Ready for a road trip to this treasured little town?

Distance From Tokyo : 2.5 Hours from Tokyo Station

Suggested Read: 10 Alluring Lakes In Japan That Look Like They’re From Another World!

6. Kawaguchiko

_Kawaguchiko

Image Source Kawaguchiko is one of the famous places near Tokyo where you can witness the beautiful view of Mount Fuji which is in every adventure junkies list. This place is adorned by the moss phlox, clear lakes or lavender. Alongside that, this place is known for its annual flower festivals, plenty of museums and nature spots. Kawaguchiko is quite a popular and easy day trip from Tokyo and can be a great escape from the hustle bustle of the city.

Distance From Tokyo : 130 minutes from Shunjuku Station

Suggested Read: Monsoon In Japan: Enjoy The Rains In Japan Alongside Sushi And Ramen!

7. Nokogiriyama

_Nokogiriyama

Image Source Find your escape in the nature’s lap at this beautiful retreat which is also called Sawtooth Mountain. This place is a paradise for the hikers and features quarry drops, stunning views, a numerous Buddhas. The famous Nihonji temple located at the mountain top offers a variety of things to explore. There is the largest cliff-carved Buddha and a 30-meter Goddess of Mercy which also has 1500 Arhat in between. The view from here is just incredible and cannot be missed.

Distance From Tokyo : 120 minutes from Tokyo Station

Suggested Read: Villas In Japan You Should Plan Your Stay In For A Luxurious Experience

8. Mount Takao

_Mount Takao

Image Source Often called a home to a monkey park, Mount Takao is a paradise for the hikers. Mount Takao is one of the best places to visit around Tokyo. Just like the other places in Japan, there is a temple here named Yakuoin temple which is around half way up to the mountain. Standing at this height one can enjoy the panoramic view of Tokyo and Mt Fuji. Apart from that there is a wild plant garden along with the monkey park.

Distance From Tokyo : 1 hour from Shinjuku Station

9. Chiba City

Chiba City

Image Source For a quick getaway from Tokyo, Chiba City is one of the closest places to visit. Adorned by all the traditional and modern architectures, this place gives a feeling of time gone still. The castle in the city is locally famous for being a folk museum where one can go and learn things. Alongside this, the Chiba Shrine is also an impressive spot which cannot be missed. Apart from this there is a Hoki Museum where variety of art works can be witnessed. Also you will get a chance to ride the world’s longest suspended monorail which is exciting and safe.

Distance From Chiba City : 40 minutes from Tokyo Station

10. Matsumoto

_Matsumoto

Matsumoto is a quite far from Tokyo if you’re planning a day trip but this place is considered as one of the best places to visit near Tokyo. This classy town boasts a famous castle, an onsen town, incredible view of mountain ranges and an ideal place to explore on a cycle. This is one of the best places to visit during spring season as alongwith the beautiful views around, there are plenty of museums which offers a chance to explore the past.

Distance From Tokyo : 275 minutes from Tokyo Station

Further Read: 35 Best Places To Visit In Japan That Make It Look Right Out Of A Storybook

Are you ready to take the much awaited road trip with your gang and explore these heritage places located close to Tokyo? From traditional cities to places which boasts the history of Japan, there are a lot of things to do and explore in the vicinity. So, if a trip to Japan is on your mind, then make sure to not miss out these less known but beautiful places near Tokyo.

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Top 25 Easy Day Trips From Tokyo

See another side of Japan with these easy day trips from Tokyo.

From walking in the shadow of Mt. Fuji to gazing at extravagant temples and shrines, there are many interesting things to do and places to visit around Tokyo. If you’re looking for suggestions, here are our best 25 easy day trips from Tokyo — by train, bus or private car — including some underrated gems.

Pro tip: Before buying any train tickets, see if the JR Tokyo Wide Pass will save you some money.

The best Tokyo day trip for you may depend on the season. Check out our other articles for highlights across the year:

  • Winter Day Trips From Tokyo
  • Spring Day Trips from Tokyo
  • Summer Day Trips From Tokyo
  • Autumn Day Trips From Tokyo

Note that all prices listed below are estimates.

1. Kamakura

1 hour by train from Shinjuku Station ¥ 950 (one way) Recommended tour: A fun day out discovering Kamakura

flowers buddha in kamakura

One of the more popular spots, Kamakura is well known for its traditional Kyoto style, with temples and shrines galore. There are great light hiking options , as well as plenty of delicious local street foods to try and beaches to lie on. You can easily cover the area in a day, with hikes taking you to see the famed giant Buddha, as well as beautiful shrines with bamboo forests , teahouses, and more.

Pro tip: Go deeper into Kita Kamakura, with brunch and a guided temple tour .

For a full run-down of what’s on offer, see our Kamakura mega guide .

2. Enoshima

1 hour 10 minutes by train from Shinjuku Station ¥ 650 (one way) Recommended tour: Kamakura and Enoshima day tour

tourist spot near tokyo station

As one of the most popular Tokyo beach resorts (also see neighbor Kamakura), Enoshima offers sands to lie on and a stunning island to explore. You can walk to the island easily from the station and visit shrines, an observatory, and gardens, before cooling off in the caves on the other side. Be warned, there are quite a few steps, but you can also explore the island by boat.

Read up on the various Enoshima sightseeing options , as well as how to get there from Tokyo.

Pro tip: Combine Kamakura and Enoshima in an economical one-day bus tour from Tokyo .

1 hour 50 minutes by train from Asakusa Station 2-day Nikkō pass available : ¥ 2,120 (round trip, does not incl. limited express fare) Recommended tour: Guided Nikkō day tour from Tokyo

Nikko shrine UNESCO

Easily extended into a weekend trip but great for a busy day too, Nikkō is famed for its stunning scenery and numerous temples and shrines. You can explore the cultural spots or escape into nature, such as the nearby waterfall or lake. Make sure to visit the elegant Tōshōgū Shrine , dedicated to the founding ruler of the Tokugawa Shogunate, Tokugawa Ieyasu.

See our Nikkō sightseeing guide for more info on what to do there, and our Nikkō transport guide for the best ways to get there from Tokyo.

1 hour 30 minutes by train from Shinjuku Station ¥ 2,470 (one way) Recommended tour: Mt Fuji and Hakone 1-Day Bus Tour Return by Bullet Train

View of Fuji from Hakone

Home to hot springs galore, onsen eggs, mountains, and teahouses, Hakone is one of the most popular day trips from Tokyo. Perfect for a nature-based escape, it has  three great hiking trails , as well as gondolas to volcanic valleys and pirate ships that traverse a beautiful lake. There are over a dozen museums in the area so you can take your pick, from wandering around the Hakone Open Air Museum to Impressionist collections at the Pola Museum . It’s also a great place for Evangelion fans to see their favorite spots from the anime. You may need more than a day in Hakone to experience everything.

Read more about the things you can get up to in Hakone and other options to get there in our full Hakone guide and Hakone day trip itinerary .

5. Kawaguchiko

2 hours by train or bus from Shinjuku Station From ¥ 2,200 (one way) Recommended tour: Mt Fuji Day Trip with Private English Speaking Driver

mt fuji at Arakurayama Sengen Park

Mount Fuji is probably pretty high on your Japan list, and unless you’re climbing it , a view of the world-famous volcano is hard to beat. Enter Kawaguchiko. Here you can choose from views across fields of moss phlox , clear lakes, or lavender — in fact, there aren’t many places that won’t have Mt. Fuji somewhere in the background. The most iconic of these can be found featuring the Chūreitō Pagoda at Arakurayama Sengen Park, or on top of a rollercoaster at Fuji Q Highland .

With annual flower festivals, plenty of museums and nature spots, onsen, and more, Kawaguchiko is an easy day trip from Tokyo with lots to choose from.

Take a look at our full Kawaguchiko day trip guide for all the info, especially on how to get there: highway buses may be a better option than trains for some visitors.

Pro tip: This Mt. Fuji day trip tour , which includes a visit to the fifth station of Mount Fuji, plus a ride on the Mt. Fuji Panoramic Ropeway and a stop-off at Lake Kawaguchi, for ¥ 11,900 , is a good-value way to see the sights.

30 minutes by train from Ikebukuro Station ¥ 490 (one way)

Kawagoe, edo era town in Saitama

Nicknamed Little Edo, Kawagoe is a charming town that has preserved the Edo feel with traditional buildings and plenty of great food. A 15- to 30-minute walk from Kawagoe Station, Kurazukuri Street is lined with preserved warehouse buildings characterized by clay walls and tiles. There are over 200 in the surrounding area and many have been turned into cafes and restaurants. There are plenty of traditional (and reasonable) lunch sets, with the local specialty being eel.

Editor’s note: Eel (unagi) is endangered , so you may want to think twice before ordering it.

There is also a whole street dedicated to sweets, in Kawagoe. If you go on the 18th of the month, you’ll see plenty of kimono-wearers (and can wear one yourself if you like), as discounts are given to those sporting the traditional outfits.

See if this is the day trip for you with our mega Kawagoe guide .

7. Mount Takao

55 minutes by train from Shinjuku Station ¥ 430 (one way) Recommended tour: Full Day Hiking Tour at Mt.Takao including Hot Spring

View of Fuji from Mt.Takao

Easy to get to, fun to hike, and home to a monkey park, Takao is a brilliant day trip for hikers and is only an hour from Tokyo. There is the lovely Yakuoin Temple around halfway up the mountain, with a creepy bird-faced Tengu standing guard. Once you reach the top, there are amazing panoramic views of Tokyo and Mt. Fuji to enjoy, as well as a wild plant garden and the aforementioned monkey park. Check out our guide to hiking routes near Tokyo, including Takao .

For more details on Takao, how to get there, and what to do once you’ve arrived, check out our full Mount Takao guide .

8. Odawara City

1 hour 30 minutes by train from Shinjuku Station ¥ 910 (one way)

Japan castle

See one of the closest castle keeps to Tokyo. Odawara is a great day trip with a beautiful castle carefully restored from Edo-period drawings. You can also enjoy the fishing port for a slap-up lunch of freshly caught fish in a donburi (rice-bowl dish) at the Odawara Fish Market Den . Stroll in the relaxing Tsujimura Botanical Gardens to round off your afternoon before heading back to the big city.

Read about more castles near Tokyo .

Pro tip: Let a knowledgeable guide show you the sights, and then sit down to dinner with a geisha as part of a special Odawara tour .

9. Ibaraki’s Ushiku Daibutsu

1 hour 30 minutes by train and bus from Tokyo Station ¥ 1,690 (one way)

buddha statue in Ibaraki

An unusual day trip takes you to see the second largest Buddha in the world — and to explore its rather surreal insides. Situated in Ibaraki , the statue stands as a perfect excuse for a day in the country, plus a picnic. You can venture inside the Buddha to practice calligraphy , see 3,000 golden Buddhas, have your shrine book signed, and enjoy views from the observation deck. The surrounding gardens have a petting zoo, koi pond, and flower displays, which change with the season.

Have a look at the full Ushiku Daibutsu article if you fancy scaling the beast.

10. Chichibu

1 hour 20 minutes by train from Ikebukuro Station ¥ 1,700 (one way)

shibazakura festival

Known mainly for its shiba-zakura festival in spring, Chichibu is a small-ish city in the west of Saitama that’s very underrated. Originally an industrial town, Chichibu is moving more toward tourism, and with its incredible mountains, that shouldn’t be a difficult transition.

There are plenty of shrines and temples to visit, as well as a pilgrimage route featuring 34 Buddhist temples. Chichibu has long had a reputation for meisen , a special silk produced only in the town and highly lauded in Edo times. You can still visit the Meisenkan to see original looms and purchase some locally made silk.

11. Kawasaki

15 minutes by train from Tokyo Station ¥ 320 (one way)

kanamara penis festival

Smaller and not as well known as Kanagawa Prefecture largest city ( Yokohama ), Kawasaki is still a lovely location with plenty to explore. While it might be best known for a certain festival , Kawasaki has other attractions, including the rather massive Daishi Temple , the Doraemon Museum , and the Japan Open-Air Folk House Museum to stroll around (known as the Nihon Minkaen). Unfortunately, Kawasaki’s once-famous dystopian warehouse amusement arcade  has long since closed.

12. Takasaki

1 hour 45 minutes by train from Shinjuku Station ¥ 1,980 (one way)

View from Takasaki City Hall Observatory

Takasaki is a laid-back city in Gunma . It is the home of Daruma — the angry-faced figures you will no doubt have seen on your travels, who bring good luck in accomplishing goals. A large majority of them are made here and you can find plenty for sale as souvenirs. There’s also the Takasaki Daruma Ichi, a market full of Daruma held on January 6 and 7.

You can visit the Jigenin Temple complex to see Daruma of every shape and size, which also happens to be near one of the biggest Kannon statues in Japan. The White-Robed Kannon stands at 40 m tall and you can enjoy views from the top for ¥ 300 . Combine that with a walk along the traditional Ishiharamachi Shopping Street and you’ll have a grand day out!

1 hour 40 minutes by train from Tokyo Station ¥ 1,980 (one way)

tourist spot near tokyo station

Atami is a hot-spring resort and a brilliant day trip from Tokyo — it has plenty of unusual attractions to keep you entertained. As well as soaking in salt-water hot springs, lazing on the beach, and enjoying the views, you can also visit a fake castle, which houses displays about real castles, enjoy the trick-art museum, and even get the gondola up to the sex museum , aka Treasure House (that actually makes it weirder?).

Plus, there is the excellent MOA Museum of Art with a mixture of Eastern and Western pieces, including work by Monet, Rembrandt, and Ogata Korin. Atami is also a good destination for divers and plum blossom lovers .

Check out our full day-trip guide to Atami and explore other nearby Izu spots , too.

Pro tip: For the non-Cheapo in a hurry, you can take the Shinkansen to Atami and slim the journey time down to 40 minutes.

14. Mt. Nokogiri

2 hours 5 minutes by train from Tokyo Station ¥ 1,980 (one way) Idea: Hike Mt. Nokogiri with a guide

Nokogiriyama View

For a real escape into nature, Nokogiriyama (aka Sawtooth Mountain) is an amazing hike filled with quarry drops, stunning views and plenty of Buddhas. The Nihonji Temple complex is stretched out across the mountaintop and has lots to explore. From the largest cliff-carved Buddha to a 30-meter Goddess of Mercy with 1500 (mostly decapitated) arhat in between, you’ll be happily distracted as you clamber up the stairs carved into the mountain. The famous View to Hell is really incredible, both to look at and enjoy yourself, and is right by the Goddess of Mercy, which might allay some vertigo fears.

Check out our guide to getting to hell and back .

15. Okutama

2 hours by train from Shinjuku Station ¥ 1,110 (one way)

tourist spot near tokyo station

A beautiful haven filled with mountains, rivers, waterfalls, and plenty more — Okutama is perfect for a long weekend or a quick escape. There are full-day hiking trails like this one , which takes you across three mountains, or you can try some of the more relaxed wanderings in the valleys. The upper reaches of the Tama River are a brilliant place to relax away from the sweltering city heat in summer and also offer a wide range of water sports, like rafting . You can also visit Nippara Cave —the longest in the Kanto region.

16. Misaki Port Town and Jogashima Island

1 hour 40 minutes by train and bus from Shinagawa Station ¥ 1,090 (one way)

Jogashima day trip from tokyo

If you really want to escape, there’s nowhere better than an island to really feel like you’ve put some distance between you and Tokyo. On the Miura coast of Kanagawa, the small fishing town of Misaki (known as Japan’s “tuna town”) has its own fish market early in the morning and plenty of fresh fish to fill up on too. The official market finishes at 9 a.m., but most stalls remain open till late afternoon.

Feeling fancy? You can snag yourself a luxury overnight stay in Miura , complete with your own private sushi chef (it’s not as pricey as it sounds).

Jogashima Island is connected to Misaki Town and is rocky with some swimming spots, plus a hiking trail that takes you all the way around — a distance of about 3–4 km. If that seems like too much work, get off early at Miura-kaigan Station and head to Miura Beach or visit the early-blooming cherry blossom festival in March.

Our Miura day trip guide  has more details on the peninsula.

17. Yokohama

25 minutes by train from Tokyo Station ¥ 490 (one way)

Minato Mirai

The second biggest city in Japan with over 3 million people, Yokohama has plenty to keep you entertained if you’re after a city break from your city break. With stunning night views across the Minato Mirai waterfront area, not one but two ramen museums (the  Cup Noodle Museum  and the  Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum ), an amazing  art scene , the beautiful  Sankei-en Gardens  and a massive  Chinatown , you can have a brilliantly busy day out in a more relaxed city.

Check out our sample itinerary for ideas on how to spend a day in Yokohama .

1 hour 5 minutes by train from Ueno Station ¥ 3,890 (one way)

Kairaku-en Gardens

The capital city of nearby Ibaraki Prefecture, Mito was once the stronghold of the Mito clan in the Edo period. It is now most famous for the stunning Kairaku-en Gardens , which are one of the top three gardens in the country.

The gardens were designed by Tokugawa Nariaki, the ninth feudal lord of the clan, as one of the first public gardens (even though it was only for samurai level and above). Regular buses run from the station to the gardens and you can also enjoy the incredibly modern Art Tower and the Mito City Museum .

For a more nature-based day out, you could visit Lake Senba and cycle around as there are bike rental places nearby. If you’re there in spring, there’s a delightful plum festival .

19. Tokyo Disneyland and DisneySea

15 minutes by train from Tokyo Station ¥ 230 (one way)

Tokyo Disneyland

Among the more unique Disney resorts, Tokyo Disneyland and DisneySea are markedly different from the others dotted across the world.

Aside from just enjoying all the usual rides and Disney stuff, you can visit the only DisneySea , try the variety of popcorn flavors, and enjoy all the matching costumes (and this time we mean the guests, not the characters). These two parks are (we’re told) the only ones in the world not wholly owned by Disney (although they do have creative control), so it is a great chance to see a Japanese twist on classics — although don’t worry, nothing key has been altered!

If you’re keen to head to the fun straight from the airport, check out our Narita to Disney guide . If you want pointers to good hotels in the area, check out our Disney accommodation guide , and here are some tips for saving money at Disney .

Pro tip: Pre-book your Tokyo Disney Resort tickets online , for ease of entry.

20. Nagatoro and the Arakawa River

2 hours 15 minutes by train from Shinjuku Station ¥ 1,950 (one way)

people by the arakawa river in nagatoro

Nagatoro arguably offers some of the most stunning, unspoiled nature in all of Japan, as well as the chance to get involved. You can enjoy a riverboat tour through some surprisingly rapid waters, with over 200,000 visitors trying it every year. If you like a little danger, you can try white water rafting or paragliding, and if you don’t, there’s a riverside hiking trail too.

The small town is home to Hodosan Mountain Shrine and Iwadatami shopping street, which is filled with local produce. There’s an occasional steam train, the “ Paleo Express ” running on the Chichibu Railway, which stops for a while and lets off steam at Nagatoro. Remember to try the local specialty of walnuts and sun-dried tomatoes, as well as locally made soba and udon.

21. Chiba City

40 minutes by train from Tokyo Station ¥ 660 (one way)

Day trip from tokyo to chiba

One of the closest day trips from Tokyo, Chiba City is packed with all things traditional as well as some amazing modern creations too. The castle is a folk museum with plenty to learn, and Chiba Shrine is not to be missed. You can enjoy some great art at the Hoki Museum , which focuses on realism and has a variety of works. There is also the Chiba Museum of Art and the Science Museum , so no one is left wanting on the museum front.

To get around the city, you can ride the world’s longest-suspended monorail which feels wrong, but is definitely safe. One of the most visited spots is the Chiba Port Tower, which was built to commemorate the population reaching 5 million in the 1980s, and offers a 360-degree view of the city and its surroundings. There are numerous parks and even a zoo complete with pandas — so you can balance your day perfectly.

22. Katsunuma

2 hours 10 minutes by train from Shinjuku Station ¥ 1,980 (one way)

winery day trip from tokyo

Fans of wine, look no further. Katsunuma is one of the top three wine producers in the country and is only a stone’s throw away in nearby Yamanashi Prefecture . Despite the humidity, wine has been successfully produced in Japan since the Meiji Period (with Emperor Meiji being a great fan himself). It does require a slightly different procedure compared to grapes grown in less humid countries, but is no less delicious!

With plenty of wineries nearby, you can enjoy unlimited tastings like the coin-operated wine machines from ¥ 100 at Budo no Oka , or just enjoy the hospitality of the different wineries on your route — although purchasing is recommended eventually. Along with the grapes, the area produces plenty of fresh fruit and veg, and you can easily pick up some delicious treats for dinner before heading home.

23. Shuzenji Onsen

2 hours by train from Tokyo Station ¥ 4,640 (one way)

tourist spot near tokyo station

Grab a rickshaw, rent a kimono, and bask in the tranquility of this sleepy onsen town. Shuzenji Onsen is known for its crimson foliage in autumn , when many of the already beautiful local sights get a dust of gold. Here you’ll find one of the oldest hot spring baths in Izu, Tokko no Yu (look, don’t touch); a bamboo grove down a narrow path; a vermillion “lovers” bridge; and Shuzenji Temple, which often holds events throughout the year.

You can take the Odoriko train directly to Shuzenji Station from Tokyo, but the journey is even quicker — around 1 hour 30 minutes — if you grab the Shinkansen from Tokyo Station and change to the Izuhakone Tetsudo-Sunzu Line at Mishima Station. A special bus liner for ¥ 2,000 operates during the autumn season.

24. Jōgasaki Coast

1 hour 50 minutes by train and bus from Tokyo Station ¥ 4,480 (one way)

Jogasaki coast with suspension bridge

This jagged coastal walk in Izu is for those who like getting out into nature. Its scenic ocean views, lighthouse, and suspension bridges show the rugged side of Japan.

Get off at Jōgasaki-Kaigan Station and walk around 20 to 30 minutes to the start of the Jogasaki Picnical Course. You can then follow the coast to Izu Oceanic Park and end by getting a bus to Izu-Kōgen Station, where you can head back to Tokyo. If you are feeling adventurous, you could extend your hike along the coast or grab a 30-minute bus (Bus No. 108) from Izu Oceanic Park to extinct volcano Mt. Omuro .

Consider spending more than a day in the Izu Peninsula and see what else it has to offer.

25. Ashikaga City

1 hour 30 minutes by train from Asakusa Station ¥ 2,050 (one way)

wisteria in bloom at Ashikaga Flower festival

Ashikaga City in Tochigi Prefecture is one of those cities that exists out of most visitors’ realm of knowledge, but it shouldn’t be overlooked. The best time to visit is in spring, when the flower festivals at Ashikaga Flower Park are in full swing (see e.g. the Ashikaga Great Wisteria Festival ), but the park also puts on a great illumination show in winter. The city also has Ashikaga Gakkō, Japan’s first organized school that includes an idyllic Japanese garden.

For a full look at what to do and how to get there, see our day trip to Ashikaga City guide .

Watch our video for 5 of the top Tokyo day trips -->

First published in July 2017. Last updated in March 2024, by Alex Ziminski. All information is subject to change, including prices.

閱讀中文版本: 25個精選東京近郊一日遊

  • Kamakura Station
  • Great Buddha of Kamakura
  • Enoshima Shrine
  • Kawagoe Station
  • Kawaguchiko Station
  • Chiba Castle (Chiba City Folk Museum)
  • Odawara Castle
  • Kawasaki Daishi
  • Tsujimura Botanical Gardens
  • Fujiko F. Fujio Museum (Doraemon Museum)
  • Japan Open-Air Folk House Museum (Nihon Minkaen)
  • Chiba Shrine
  • Hoki Museum
  • Chiba City Museum of Art
  • Chiba City Museum of Science
  • Restaurants
  • Odawara Fish Market Den
  • Bullet train
  • Hot springs
  • Sightseeing

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Tokyo Station: 11 Things to do Around Marunouchi

By gowithguide travel specialist: tien t..

Things To Do

It would not be wrong to say that the Marunouchi District is the doorway to Japan. However, it is much more than that, it is a central hub that is thriving in business where restaurants, hotels, and skyscrapers are at every corner you can see. 

Marunouchi District used to be home for feudal lords and now is most famous for the grand Imperial Palace that lies at the center of the district. It is now the center for art, shopping, and dining that is worth a visit to experience the fusion of modern and traditional Japan.

Since it is such a huge area, you might not know where to start, so below we have compiled a list of the top 11 things to do around Marunouchi as well as near Tokyo station!

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How to get there?

If you just arrived in Tokyo in either Haneda Airport or Narita Airport, then you might be wondering how you can get here. There are many options ranging from buses to trains to taxis. 

For Haneda Airport to Tokyo Station  

You can either take the Tokyo Monorail or the Keikyu line for trains, the Limousine bus or a taxi if you so desire. Below is the price and time difference between each mode of transportation:

For Narita Airport to Tokyo Station

Narita Airport to Tokyo: Most Convenient Options

There are many more options for you to get to central Tokyo even though Narita airport is quite far away, we have prepared a guide  to help you find the most convenient way for you to get to Tokyo station as well as other areas around Tokyo. You can also find your way back from Tokyo Station to Narita Airport using the same modes of transportation. 

If you wish to travel from Tokyo Station to Shinjuku or any other stations then catching a train there is always the best and fastest option. If you don't know which one, just use Google Maps, there are also maps located around the train stations and you can ask the railway staff in English as well if you need to.

Where to stay?

Staying in this part of Tokyo is not the most inexpensive choice and are usually costly. However, choices ranging from luxurious to budget hotels near Tokyo Station are still available in Marunouchi.

Our Favourite:

  • Planetyze Hostel (for Booking.com ): The hostel provides a modern, foreigner friendly vibe that is unlike any other, it is located in the center of Tokyo and is arguably the best pricing for the services you get.

tourist spot near tokyo station

Luxury Hotels: 

  • The Tokyo Station Hotel:  It is right within the center of Tokyo and the hotel provides spacious and comfortable rooms with great views. The price is well worth it for what you get considering it's a luxury hotel.
  • Mandarin Oriental Tokyo: Probably the most luxurious of them all, they provide everything that defines a wealthy lifestyle.
  • Hoshinoya Tokyo: If you're looking for the ultimate luxury Japanese ryokan experience right in central Tokyo then look no further than Hoshinoya. 

Budget Hotels:

  • Pearl Hotel Yaesu: It's a business hotel with affordable pricing. It can be a little small but the location makes up for it.
  • Smile Hotel Nihonbashi Mitsukoshimae: Reasonable pricing business hotel with a great location.

Where to go and what to do?

The attractions around Marunouchi are astoundingly vast and spending just a few days here would not be enough to see every attraction around Tokyo station, so it's important to plan ahead! 

1. Imperial Palace

blog image

After exiting Tokyo Station, the first thing you should see are tall buildings and beside it is a vast garden, a huge reservoir of water surrounding a grand castle. That is the Imperial Palace. When you first enter it grounds, it almost as if you have entered another world, the bustling streets filled with cars, skyscrapers and people seemingly disappear and you will be enveloped by the lush greenery of the Imperial Palace. No matter the season, the gardens of the Imperial Palace are always loved by tourists and locals alike. 

Another thing,

While visitors can freely traverse around the outer area of the Imperial Palace, the only way you can inspect the inside is through an Imperial Palace Guide Tour. This tour is free of charge but you must apply at least 4 days before on their website . 

2. Character Street

blog image

Looking to buy a stuffed toy of your favorite mascot or anime characters? Then you should check out Character Street, it houses 21 stores of various characters ranging from Pokemon to Lego and you can see some surprising items. So if you want a puzzle collection, card decks and plushies of your favorite characters then definitely check this place out.

3. Sony Building

The Sony Building, one of Ginza’s landmarks

Also regarded as one of Ginza's most popular landmarks, the Sony building allows visitors to sample their products (and not just already commercialized ones but yet to be released tech as well!) for free. Sometimes if you're lucky, then you might be able to participate in one of their occasionally held workshops at the building!

4. Tokyo International Forum building

blog image

Originally an exhibition space built by architect Rafael Vinoly, it is shaped similar to that of a boat. On Weekdays, various food trucks come by and sell for hungry customers. In addition, in the basement, you can see Mitsuo Aida's work, who is one of Japan's leading modern calligrapher. There's also an antique market and various other events that are held regularly in the building, so check out their schedule  to see what else is happening!

5. Tokyo Ramen Street

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Rokurinsha said to be the original creator Tsukemen,  is a favorite here that you should try, be sure to check out other restaurants with lines of people waiting because those are usually the best. 

6. Idemitsu Museum of Arts

blog image

The museum may be small in size, but it offers a chance to close and intimate with the best of Japanese ceramics, calligraphy, and painting not just originally from Japan but across Korea and China as well. There is also a seating room where you can sit down and gaze across the Imperial Palace which is absolutely breathtaking.

7. INTERMEDIATHEQUE

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This museum is dedicated to the work of the University of Tokyo students, only the best works are displayed here. From dinosaur exo-skeleton to taxidermy, you won't know what to expect when you enter the building. 

8. Marunouchi Illumination

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Winter of Marunouchi is one of the most magical places to be in Tokyo. Every corner of is lit up with lights from trees to parks, various decorations are also put up for display. After a tiring day, walking around at night in Marunouchi is a relaxing and wondrous experience that you must check out.

9. Marunouchi House

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Located on the 7th floor of the Shin-Marunouchi building, it is the place to go if you want to dine in and enjoy a spectacular view. The restaurant sells a variety of international food and at night it's even better. Various bars and pubs will be open and you are allowed to bring your own food outside of the terrace. On Thursday and Friday nights you can expect DJs and exhibitions to be opened, making it even livelier.

10. Rent an electric bike and travel around

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Nothing is quite possibly relaxing as you rent a bike and travel around Tokyo at your leisure. The electric bikes here can get around most places in Marunouchi district and nothing is like riding around Tokyo Tower, Asakusa and getting lost in some tiny streets of Tokyo. The Chiyocle community bikes are very accessible and you can find a charging station everywhere.

11. Kitanomaru-kouen

blog image

 A natural haven in the middle of Tokyo, you can not miss this park as it is right in front of the Imperial Palace. You can pay a visit to the Museum of Modern Art Tokyo, listen to music at the Nippon Bukodan concert hall or even on the park grounds itself where random musicians display their talents! Relaxing here and enjoying the surrounding is a must after a tiring day trekking around Tokyo, if possible, visit Kitanomaru-kouen during the Cherry Blossom season and you will be amazed by the scenery!

Bottom line? 

Marunouchi has everything you need for an unforgettable experience even if you don't travel outside of the capital. Since the train station is a central hub for locals and visitors alike, there are many attractions around Tokyo station that you can enjoy and pay a visit. If you have little time, then at the least, you should check out the Imperial Palace!

Want to experience Japan to its fullest? Here's how!

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Want to  create your own tour , where you decide where you want to go?  You can  Send a Message  to our local guides to find a suitable itinerary and quotation for a memorable experience.

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Then why not  Request a Tour . Simply type what you would like to see and our guides will send you quotes and recommendations depending on what you're interested in as well as budget.

Over at  GoWithGuide , we offer the best professional Local Guides across Japan that will help you plan your trip. You can also check our  Private Tours for Tokyo .

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Tokyo Tour Guide - Leandra I.

Hello! I'm Leandra, and I'm stoked to be your guide as we dive into Japan. With seven years under my belt living here, I've become your trusted source for all things related to exploring this amazing country. Whether it's navigating the bustling city streets or trekking through scenic nature trails, I've got you covered. I have extensive experience guiding excursions through mountains, inner city hidden gems, underground music scenes, and scenic day trips in the vicinity of Tokyo. When I'm not guiding, you can catch me indulging in my hobbies of digging into Japanese history, hitting up local shrines, lacing up my running shoes for a jog, scouting out new restaurants, or hitting the trails for a hike. Originally from sunny SoCal, my roots stretch back to both Japanese and Mexican heritage, with a sprinkle of samurai lineage thrown in for good measure. So, if you're ready to dive into the real Japan, away from the tourist traps, join me for an adventure you won't soon forget. Let's do this!                                                                                                                                  

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Hello, my name is Yasuro (Mr). I was born and brought up in Kansai, graduated from a univ in Kobe city, after moved into Kanto, 30 years in Tokyo, 2.5 years in Nagoya city, 7.5 years abroad (KL & S'pore) as a rep of a construction company and I got the National Guide Certificate in 2011. My hobbies are making Haiku poems, singing various songs (voice-training for 18 years), playing the folk-guitar, trekking in mountains like Takao and Okutama in the West of Tokyo, visiting museums like in Ueno Park and travelling around Japan to make Haiku poems. Thank you for your attention.                                                                                                                                  

Yokohama Tour Guide - Haruo T.

I live in Yokohama, Kanagawa prefecture. I have a license to teach in high schools and was admitted to the degree of Master of Arts in Teaching English as a Second Language in the University of Birmingham. Until 2015 I had been teaching English at public high schools in Kanagawa for 37 years. During that time, I had some experience of guiding students from overseas through sister-school relationship around Tokyo and Kanagawa. Therefore, I had good command of English with the TOEIC score of 935. As for a tour guide experience I earned the certificate of National Government Licensed Guide-Interpreter in English and since then I have guided tourists to the popular sites around Tokyo, Yokohama, Kamakura and Yokosuka. My guiding focuses on introducing not only Japanese historical and cultural backgrounds but also giving tourists some tips to travel Japan only by themselves, such as how to use trains and subways, find good restaurants, reserve tickets, buy survenier, and speak basic Japanese. In addition, my tour includes opportunities to experience Japanese culture like Zen meditation, ninja performance, visiting anime's location sites based on tourists' request. Besides, by means of my hobbies of writing English Haiku and Waka (traditional Japanese poems) and performing Rakugo (traditional Japanese funny story telling) in English, I can surely entertain tourists during the tour. My moto as a tour guide is let the tourists have a once-in-a-lifetime experience in Japan with my profound, intelligible and interestiog guiding.                                                                                                                                  

Kanagawa Tour Guide - Kaneo U.

I’m so excited to have a chance to show you around my favorite spots in Kanagawa prefecture. I was born in Kanagawa. I spent my whole school life, including university, here in Kanagawa. I worked as a high school English teacher here for 40 years. I love Kanagawa so much. We have many interesting tourist spots, like Hakone, Kamakura, Enoshima and Yokohama. I got my tour guide license in English in 2009. I am still an English teacher. To give an interesting and impressive lesson to young high school students, I’ve learnt and gathered many kinds of information. I also have a license to teach social studies, so I have a wide range of knowledge about Japanese culture and history. I’m sure to provide you an interesting tour.                                                                                                                                  

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  • Things to Do
  • Tourist Spots & Attractions

The Top 10 Day Trip Destinations Within 2 Hours of Tokyo

tourist spot near tokyo station

  • tsunagu Japan

Tokyo is filled with plenty of unmissable sightseeing locations. But did you know that rich natural landscapes and buildings brimming with atmosphere can be found by riding the train just 1 to 2 hours away from the city? Here are 10 popular day trip destinations for scenery and experiences unlike any you'll get in Tokyo.

Check out our writers’ top Japan travel ideas!

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1. Kamakura (Kanagawa Prefecture)

Kamakura is very easy to access from the city center and is located just an hour from Tokyo, making it a popular location for a casual visit. The town is overflowing with nature, being surrounded by mountains and the sea, and is home to beautiful flowers and scenery that change with each of the four seasons. 

Kamakura was one of the former capitals of Japan in ancient times, and more than 100 Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples remain today. Some places not to be missed are Tsurugaoka Hachimangu Shrine, known as a power spot where people wish for luck and good fortune in business, and Hokokuji Temple, famous for the magical bamboo grove inside its grounds. In addition, Komachi Street (Komachi-dori), which runs between Kamakura Station and Tsurugaoka Hachimangu Shrine, is lined with approximately 250 shops and restaurants, many of which sell grab-and-go food items that can be enjoyed while strolling along the street. Kamakura is lined with both historical buildings and new trendy cafes, making it an attractive destination for a broad range of people of all ages.

Access from Tokyo Station: 12 stops on the JR Yokosuka Line (no transfers) Time required:  Around 1 hour Fare: 935 yen Highlights: Tsurugaoka Hachimangu Shrine, Hokokuji Temple, Komachi Street, the Great Buddha of Kamakura, Enoshima 

Note: Kamakura’s city center isn’t very large, and you can easily explore the area on foot, but if you want to see the ocean around Enoshima, it takes about 25 minutes from Kamakura Station on the Enoden (Enoshima Electric Railway). If you want to enjoy plenty of what Kamakura has to offer, from the history and local cuisine to the scenery at Enoshima, it’s suggested to arrive early in the day.

For more things to do in Kamakura, see our article  15 of the Best Photogenic Sightseeing Spots in Kamakura That You Have to Visit .

2. Nikko (Tochigi Prefecture)

Nikko is a small city surrounded by the mountains of Tochigi Prefecture. There are a great number of historic buildings in Nikko, including the three shrines and temples which make up the World Heritage Site known as “Shrines and Temples of Nikko.” The most famous among them is the magnificent Nikko Toshogu Shrine, the grounds of which are home to 55 stunning structures, including 8 national treasures and 34 Important Cultural Properties of Japan. Each is decorated with Japanese lacquer and brilliant colors, with numerous carvings of stunning beauty decorating the buildings. 

The area is also blessed with beautiful natural scenery such as waterfalls and wetlands and is home to many popular outdoor spots including Kegon Falls, Lake Chuzenji, and Mount Nantai. In addition, Nikko’s Kinugawa area is known as one of the most prominent hot spring areas in the Kanto region.

Access from Tokyo Station:  Transfer from the JR Tohoku Shinkansen Line to the JR Nikko Line at Utsunomiya Station Time required:  Around 2 hours Fare: 5,150 yen Highlights: Nikko Toshogu Shrine, Kegon Falls, Lake Chuzenji, Kinugawa Onsen

Note: Nikko is about 3 - 7 degrees (Celsius) cooler than Tokyo. Even in summer, the mornings and evenings here can be chilly, so it’s recommended to bring a light jacket. It gets particularly cold here in winter with temperatures dropping below freezing, so be prepared with appropriate clothing. 

For more things to do in Nikko, see our article  13 Sightseeing Attractions You Won't Want to Miss When Visiting Nikko! .

3. Mount Fuji (Shizuoka Prefecture / Yamanashi Prefecture)

When most people think of Japan, they think of Mount Fuji. Mount Fuji is the tallest mountain in Japan at 3,776 meters in elevation and was registered as a World Heritage Site in 2013.  The very same Mount Fuji can be reached from Tokyo in about 2.5 hours. There are many tourist attractions surrounding Mount Fuji, so in addition to climbing the mountain, it can also be fun to visit for the purpose of enjoying the sights of the whole area. 

The appearance of Mount Fuji changes with the season, time of day, and even the viewing angle. For example, on a windless day, you can see “inverse Fuji” reflected on a calm water surface, or you may see “red Fuji” when the snow-capped Mount Fuji is stained red by the rising or setting sun. Try enjoying the views of Mount Fuji on these different occasions.

Access from Tokyo: transfer from JR Chuo Line Chuo Special Rapid to Fujikyuko Line at Otsuki Station Time required: around 2 hours and 40 minutes Fare: 2,560 yen Highlights: Fuji Five Lakes (Lake Yamanaka, Lake Kawaguchi, Lake Motosu, Lake Saiko, and Lake Shoji)

Note: book a mountain hut when spending a night on the mountain. There are some people who take a day to climb the mountain from dawn, but it is not recommended due to problems such as altitude sickness. If you are going to climb Mount Fuji, it is recommended to prepare sufficiently before climbing.

For more information about Mount Fuji, see our article  The Ultimate Travel Guide to Mt. Fuji .

Check out our writers’ top Japan travel ideas!

4. Hakone (Kanagawa Prefecture)

Hakone is a tourist destination that has long been known as an onsen town. This area has many charms, such as sublime nature, spots filled with history, and art galleries. Many events are held in Hakone that can be enjoyed throughout the year, beginning with the Hakone Ekiden, a race that signifies the New Year for many Japanese people. There are also many means of transportation in the area, such as the mountain railway, cable cars, and buses, making it an exceedingly easy place to get around while traveling between the many sightseeing spots. 

The area around Hakone-Yumoto Station, the gateway to Hakone, is a hot spring resort town, and there are many restaurants and souvenir shops here as well. There are several hot spring facilities that can be visited during the day, making it convenient for those who don’t have time to stay overnight or just want to visit one more onsen before finishing their trip. 

At Owakudani, one of Hakone’s most iconic tourist attractions, visitors can get a spectacular view of white smoke rising up from the rugged terrain. The local specialty there, "kuro tamago," are a boiled eggs with pitch-black shells, made by cooking the eggs directly in the hot spring for 60 minutes. There is a statue called “Enmei Jizoson” at Owakudani which is a jizo (guardian deity) of prolonged life and child-rearing. For this reason, it is said that eating the kuro tamago will prolong your life.

Access from Tokyo Station: T ransfer from the JR Tokaido Shinkansen Line to the Odakyu Limited Express at Odawara Station Time required: Around 1 hour Fare: 3,800 yen

Highlights: Hakone-Yumoto Station area, Owakudani, Hakone Ropeway

For more things to do, see our article on the  30 Best Things to Do in Hakone .

5. Izu (Shizuoka Prefecture)

Izu has a warm climate year-round and is rich in nature. Here you can enjoy beautiful views of the sea with Mount Fuji in the background, gorgeous sunsets, the refreshing nature of the Izu Kogen area, and seasonal flowers including the Kawazu Sakura (the earliest-blooming cherry blossoms on Honshu), narcissus, and nanohana flowers. Other famous sights include Shuzenji Temple, namesake of the Shuzenji Onsen where it is located; Izu Granpal Park, and Lake Ippeki. Families with children might enjoy the Shimoda Kaichu Aquarium or trying their hands at local tea harvesting. Taking a leisurely stroll around the area's many onsen towns, beloved by Japan’s literary masters, while soaking up the traditional atmosphere is also highly recommended. You can even wish for a boost to your financial luck at the local power spot, the “Toi Gold Mine.” 

As the region is rich in the natural bounty of both the sea and the mountains, more than a few tourists also come to Izu just to enjoy its local gourmet cuisine, made using local fresh ingredients.

Access from Tokyo Station:  Transfer from the JR Shinkansen Line to the Ito Line at Atami Station Time required: 1.5+ hours Fare: 4,070 yen Highlights: Shuzen-ji Temple, Izu Granpal Park, Lake Ippeki, Shimoda Kaichu Aquarium, Toi Gold Mine

Note: Izu is divided into four large areas: Higashi Izu, Minami Izu, Nishi Izu, and Naka Izu. Depending on the locations you want to visit, you won’t be able to see everything in one day, so it’s suggested to decide on your destinations and route ahead of time.

6. Atami (Shizuoka Prefecture)

Atami is the gateway to the southern tip of Shizuoka Prefecture, the Izu Peninsula. It has a long history as a popular destination for its onsen and resorts. Atami is surrounded by rich natural landscape, and the vast open ocean stretches out before your eyes. It is a wonderful place for swimming in summer, viewing colorful foliage in the autumn, and admiring plum and cherry blossoms from winter into spring. There are also fireworks festivals held in Atami throughout the year, so no matter which season you visit, there is always something to see. 

Atami Onsen was apparently even favored by the legendary Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu, founder of the Tokugawa Shogunate (1600 - 1868), and is an onsen that’s said to have been opened back in ancient times. This special place, which has also been loved by literary masters through the years, is a hot spring that Japanese people continue to visit to this day, thanks to its excellent water quality. In front of Atami Station, there is a footbath supplied by a natural hot spring known as “Ieyasu no Yu.” Anyone can use it for free, and it is always overflowing with visitors. 

Access from Tokyo Station: 4 stops on the JR Shinkansen (no transfer) Time required: Around 45 minutes Fare: 4,270 yen (reserved ticket) or 3,740 yen (unreserved ticket) Highlights: Atami Onsen, Atami Plum Garden, Atami Sun Beach

7. Yokohama (Kanagawa Prefecture)

Yokohama is a melting pot of Japanese, Western, Chinese, and other cultures. The city is particularly popular among Japanese people and was chosen as the most desired place to live in 2018. The city has great access from Tokyo, located within a 30-minute train ride from Shinjuku, Tokyo, and Shinagawa stations, and is home to many people who work in Tokyo. 

With modern and retro buildings standing side-by-side at the Yokohama Red Brick Warehouse, authentic Chinese cuisine at Yokohama Chinatown, aquariums, art galleries, and shopping malls, Yokohama is the perfect spot for a good time on your day off. It’s also a popular date-night destination thanks to the romantic scene created by the evening light-up display at the port.

Access from Tokyo Station: 4 stops on the JR Tokaido Main Line (no transfer) Time required:  Around 25 minutes Fare: 480 yen Highlights: Minato Mirai, Yamashita Park, Yokohama Red Brick Warehouse, Yokohama Chinatown

For more places to go in Yokohama, see our article  16 Photogenic Spots in Yokohama That You Have to Capture on Camera .

8. Mount Takao

You can get to Mount Takao by train from Shinjuku Station in just 50 minutes, making this the closest nature area to Tokyo’s urban center. The mountain is optimal for hiking and there are many climbing trails up to the 599-meter peak. It’s also popular as an easy mountain to climb for beginners due to the cable cars and lifts that run up the mountainside for those who aren't keen on trekking. On the side of the mountain is Takao-san Yakuo-in Yuki-ji Temple, boasting 1200-odd years of history. This is considered one of the three head temples of Kanto, alongside Naritasan Shinsho-ji Temple and Kawasaki Daishi Heiken-ji Temple. 

Since you can do this trek as a day trip, the mountain is bustling with climbers on the weekend. For this reason, those hoping for a more relaxed hike are recommended to make the trip on a weekday. On a clear day, it is even possible to see Mount Fuji from the top. Additionally, at the base of Mount Takao is a hot spring called Gokurakuyu where you can refresh yourself after enjoying a hike.

Access from Tokyo Station:  Transfer from the JR Chuo Line to the Keio Takao Line at Takao Station Time required:  Around 1 hour Fare: 1,070 yen Highlights: Mount Takao’s summit, Yakuo-in Yuki-ji Temple, Gokurakuyu bathhouse

Note: This is an easy mountain to climb for beginners, but it’s suggested to wear practical shoes for walking. There are no garbage bins on the mountain, so be ready to bring any trash back down with you.

9. Chichibu (Saitama Prefecture)

Chichibu, located in the north-west part of Saitama Prefecture, is the most spacious town in the prefecture and is home to many gourmet specialties, tourist spots, and activities in nature. There are many famous historical places here, but among them, Chichibu shrine, Chichibu Imamiya Shrine, and Mitsumine Shrine are particularly known for being power spots. Mitsumine Shrine is famous as a place to go to pray for success in life and fortune in business. 

One particular place worth recommending is Hitsujiyama Park, a great spot to enjoy the natural landscape of Chichibu. This park is located on high ground overlooking the streets of Chichibu and is a popular spot for flower viewing and outings. In April, the cherry blossoms here are in full bloom, while late June to early July is the best time to see the blooming of 10,000 Japanese irises.

Access from Tokyo Station:  Transfer from the JR Ueno-Tokyo Line to Chichibu Railway at Kumagaya Station Time required: 2 hours 45 minutes Fare: 2,050 yen Highlights: Chichibu Shrine, Chichibu Imamiya Shrine, Mitsumine Shrine, Hitsujiyama Park

10. Kawagoe (Saitama Prefecture)

Kawagoe, a flourishing castle town since the Edo Period (1600 - 1868), is a charming town also known as  “Little Edo,” with a historical "kurazukuri-style" streetscape. Just by walking the streets, you will pass many historical spots. Be sure to find the symbol of Kawagoe, “Toki no Kane" (the tower shown in the photo above), charming back alleys, shopping streets, and more. There also are many kimono rental shops in Kawagoe, so another fun thing to do is put on a kimono and talk a leisurely stroll around the streets that are brimming with Edo-period atmosphere. There are also many gourmet spots in town, including a street lined with traditional sweets stores that stretches on for 80 meters, making it a great place to walk and snack at the same time.

Access from Tokyo Station:  Transfer from the Tokyo Metro Marunouchi Line to the Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin Line at Ikebukuro Station Time required: Around 1 hour Fare: 610 yen Highlights: Toki no Kane, Kawagoe Ichibangai, Taisho-Roman Shopping Street

For some off-the-beaten-path things to do in Kawagoe, check out our article  The Kawagoe Wander Diary: 4 Amazing Places to Add to Your Travel Itinerary .

That’s it for our top 10 day trip destinations that you can reach by train from Tokyo. Put them on the list for your next Japan trip!

If you want to give feedback on any of our articles, you have an idea that you'd really like to see come to life, or you just have a question on Japan, hit us up on our  Facebook ,  Twitter , or  Instagram !

Kanto Feature

The information in this article is accurate at the time of publication.

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The Complete Guide to Tokyo Station

Tokyo Station and its beautiful, nostalgic red brick building is on the must-see list of every tourist to Japan. Besides its impressive value as a sightseeing spot, Tokyo Station is also an important hub that isn’t only served by major JR Lines such as Yamanote and Chuo but also is a major station for several shinkansen bullet trains. About 3,000 trains arrive and depart at Tokyo Station on a single day and when traveling around Tokyo, it’s going to be an important station for you as well. The station premises boast a large variety of shops and restaurants, offering both respite to rest tired legs and great opportunities for unique souvenir shopping. However, there’s one downside: the station is so large, it’s easy to get lost! To keep that from happening, let’s take a thorough look at the structure of Tokyo Station , its major lines and exits, and what’s around the building.

7 Key Points of Tokyo Station to Remember

1. The two main entrances are the Marunouchi Exit on the west side and the Yaesu Exit on the east side Tokyo Station stretches rather long towards north and south but the major exits are on the west and east side of the station. Marunouchi Exit is the main exit of the west side and the magnificence of the red brick building that is Tokyo Station can be best appreciated here. It is made up of, from north to south, the Marunouchi North Exit, the Marunouchi Central Exit, and the Marunouchi South Exit on the ground floor. The basement floor has three exits as well: the Marunouchi Underground North Exit, the Marunouchi Underground Central Exit, Marunouchi Underground South Exit. Taking any of the Marunouchi Exits will lead you to the Imperial Palace and Hibiya. The main exit of the east side is the Yaesu Exit and this is where a lot of stylish souvenir shops can be found. From north to south, the Yaesu Exit area includes the Yaesu North Exit, the Yaesu central Exit, and the Yaesu South Exit on the ground floor, while the Yaesu Central Exit ticket gates on the first basement floor provide great access to the Yaesu Underground shopping area.

The information map at Tokyo Station

2. JR East has a total of 28 platforms at Tokyo Station Including the shinkansen platforms, JR East serves a total of 28 platforms, 20 above ground and 8 underground – which is the largest number in all of Japan. The area of the station is an amazing 182,000 square meters large and would be able to fit the massive Tokyo Dome 3.6 times!

The platform information of JR lines and shinkansen lines

3. Tokyo Station is a historic hot spot Tokyo Station was designed by Tatsuno Kingo, a representative architect of Japan’s Meiji area, and was completed in 1914 – the original building now serves as the Tokyo Station Marunouchi Station Building. In 2014, 100 years after the original completion of the characteristic building, thorough reconstruction and restoration works were carried out to make the historic spot more resistant to earthquakes and to fix age-related issues. Especially noteworthy are the two dome roofs of the Marunouchi North Exit and Marunouchi South Exit. After their destruction in the air raids of World War II, they were rebuilt in 1947 but didn’t look much like the original architecture . This also was reverted in 2014 and the two domes now look like they did over 100 years ago.

1. The stone monument near the Marunouchi Central Exit is a popular photo shop 2. The majority of the Marunouchi Station Building houses the Tokyo Station Hotel 3. The brick walls of the original building can be seen from within the ticket gates 4. Inside the South Dome, where the Marunouchi South ticket gates are located. The ornaments from the third floor upward are restored to look like the original of 1914.

4. The Marunouchi side and the Yaesu side are connected by the North Passage The west side where the Marunouchi exits are is connected to the east side and its Yaesu exits by the North Passage. This passage is available both on the ground floor and the first basement floor, directly connecting the Marunouchi North Exit and the Yaesu North Exit. There’s no passage like that directly connecting the south exits, so use the north passage to get from one south exit to the other.

The North Passage, seem from the Marunouchi side

5. Transfer to the shinkansen lines without passing through the JR ticket gates Naturally, the shinkansen bullet trains can only be accessed with special tickets and special ticket gates. Tokyo Station has designated shinkansen ticket gates labeled as “Transfer Gate,” located on the first floor near the Yaesu Exit area. If you’re taking the shinkansen and arrive at Tokyo Station with a JR Line, such as the Yamanote or Chuo Line, you can directly transfer without having to pass through the JR ticket gates. Simply follow the North Passage, Central Passage, or South Passage within the ticket gates to get to the Yaesu side where the shinkansen transfer is located. Even if you didn’t buy tickets in advance, there is a ticket area just in front of the Transfer Gate. Should you arrive at Tokyo Station by bus or taxi, you’ll find your way to the shinkansen area by taking the Yaesu North Exit, Yaesu Central Exit, Yaesu South Exit or Nihonbashi Exit.

The transfer area to tge Tokaido and Sanyo Shinkansen near JR Station’s Central Passage on the first floor

6. There are plenty of shops both within and outside the ticket gates The first basement floor and the ground floor boast an astounding number of shops and commercial facilities, offering unique souvenirs and gourmet experiences. Here are some of the main shopping areas and shops at Tokyo Station : ● First Avenue Tokyo Station (Tokyo-eki Ichibangai) Location: Yaesu Exit area B1F (outside the ticket gates) First Avenue Tokyo Station is where the famous Tokyo Ramen Street and its 8 iconic shops can be found, as well as the three big sweets manufacturer shops of Tokyo Okashi Land. Another major highlight is Tokyo Character Street, uniting goods of Hello Kitty, Rilakkuma, Ultraman, and other well-known Japanese heroes and characters. ● Kurobei Yokocho (Black Fence Alley) Location: Yaesu Exit area B1F, along the North Passage (outside the ticket gates) This atmospheric gourmet area is defined by its beautiful black wall design, uniting modern style with traditional aesthetics. There’s a large variety of Japanese food to be tried, including yakitori , kushiyaki (skewered dishes), or Yonezawa beef. If you want to try Japanese sake, it’s also a recommended spot. ● GRANSTA Location: Marunouchi area B1F, along the Central Passage (outside the ticket gates) GRANSTA is a commercial facility that is rather colorful, mixing high-end brands with trendy shops for people from all walks of life. GRANSTA is also a great gourmet location and we especially recommend trying beef tongue here. ● GRANSTA MARUNOUCHI Location: Marunouchi area B1F (outside the ticket gates) This is another part of the GRANSTA complex, also located on the basement floor of the Marunouchi area. It’s known for diverse shops selling various fashion styles, miscellaneous goods, and organic food, as well as atmospheric cafés and bakeries. ● Daimaru Tokyo Station Location: between Yaesu Central Exit and Yaesu North Exit Daimaru is a long-established department store with a history of over 300 years. The massive shop spans from the first basement floor to the 13th floor and is directly connected to Tokyo Station on the ground floor and basement floor.

1. Tokyo Character Street 2. Tokyo Ramen Street 3. Kurobei Yokocho 4. and 5, Gransta Marunouchi 6. Daimaru Tokyo Store

7. The highway bus terminal is at the Yaesu Exit area, the Hato Bus can be found on the Marunouchi side From Tokyo station , JR operates several highway buses that take you to areas like Hakone and Kawaguchiko, as well as closer places like Tokyo Skytree Town. Keep in mind that arrival and departure areas are separate! The departure and ticket area is just outside Yaesu South Exit, to the right. Take the “The Access Narita ” bus for smooth and direct transfer to Narita Airport . It departs right in front of the Nihonbashi Exit. On the other side of the station, you’ll find the departure and ticket area of Hato Bus at the Marunouchi exits. Simply leave the station via the Marunouchi North Exit and go left, the bus stop is right there.

The JR bus departure area in front of Yaesu South Exit

The Main Lines of Tokyo Station

A JR line platform information sign

Tokyo Station is served by JR (JR East and JR-Central) and Tokyo Metro. Platforms 1 to 10 on the second floor belong to JR, serving as the arrival and departure platforms for the Chuo Line, the Keihin Tohoku Line, the Yamanote Line, the Tokaido Line, and the Ueno Tokyo Line. The Keio Line which takes you to Chiba and Maihama (Tokyo Disney Resort) is on the fourth basement floor, while the Narita Express can be found on the fifth basement floor. This information is important because it does take a bit of time to transfer from one line to another and you don’t want to find yourself missing a train because of that. If you walk to Otemachi Station just 5 minutes away from Tokyo Station ’s Marunouchi North Exit, you’ll also have access to Tokyo Metro’s Tozai Line, Chiyoda Line, Hanzomon Line, and Toei Subway’s Mita Line.

tourist spot near tokyo station

What’s Around Tokyo Station’s East and West Exits?

・West Side: Marunouchi Exit Area The Tokyo Imperial Palace (Wadakura Fountain Park , The Imperial Palace East Gardens ), Marunouchi Building, Shin-Marunouchi Building, KITTE (JP Tower), Maruzen Marunouchi Main Store, Otemon Gate, Museum of the Imperial Collections, Tokyo Station Hotel , Tokyo Station Gallery, GRANSTA Marunouchi, Tokyo International Forum

1. The Tokyo Marunouchi Station Building 2. Several buildings, including KITTE (JP Tower), Marunouchi Building, and Shin-Marunouchi Building 3. Tokyo International Forum 4. Tokyo Imperial Palace Bridge

All thee Marunouchi side exits face the Tokyo Station Rotary which is surrounded by high-rise buildings such as the Marunouchi Building, the Shin-Marunouchi Building, and KITTE (the former Tokyo Central Post Office). Leave the station and go straight ahead to arrive at the moat of the Imperial Palace in about 5 minutes. Going left from the Marunouchi South Exit will take you to Hato Bus Terminal and the Tokyo International Forum.

tourist spot near tokyo station

・East Side: Yaesu Exit Area JR Express Bus Terminal, Four Seasons Hotel Marunouchi Tokyo, Daimaru Tokyo, Marunouchi Trust Tower, Nihonbashi Takashimaya, Hotel Metropolitan Marunouchi (Sapia Tower), Shangri-La Hotel , Tokyo, Yaesu Shopping Mall , Yaesu Book Center

1. Around Yaesu Central Exit 2. Nippon Gourmet Road on the first basement floor 3. JR Express Bus Terminal 4. Yaesu Book Center

The first floor of the Yaesu Exit area has three separate exits. Taking Yaesu South Exit and going to the left will take you to the JR Express Bus Terminal. Yaesu Central Exit and Yaesu North Exit are both directly connected to Daimaru Tokyo. Leave the Yaesu ticket gates on the first basement floor to find yourself in front of a large shopping area and commercial facilities, including First Avenue Tokyo Station and Kurobei Yokocho. Daimaru Tokyo is also directly connected to the area. The Yaesu Exit area is a bustling downtown with numerous restaurants and pubs , as well as luxury and business hotels .

tourist spot near tokyo station

West Exit Directions: to the Imperial Palace and Marunouchi!

The main exits on JR Tokyo Station ’s west side are, from north to south on the first floor, Marunouchi North Exit, Marunouchi Central Exit, and Marunouchi South Exit. On the second floor are, from north to south, Marunouchi Underground North Exit, Marunouchi Underground Central Exit, and Marunouchi Underground South Exit. The Marunouchi Station building is a beautiful, Western-inspired red brick building, designated as an important cultural asset of Japan, so don’t hesitate to take a commemorative photo! If you’re transferring from the JR lines to Tokyo Metro Marunouchi Line, we recommend taking the Marunouchi Underground Central Exit ticket gates. Here are the directions from JR Yamanote Line bound for Shinagawa and Shibuya (outbound) on platform 4 to each exit: ● To Marunouchi North Exit 1. Descend the stairs on the northern end of the platform. 2. Turn left right after the stairs. 3. Continue straight through the North Passage and pass the Marunouchi North Exit ticket gates. 4. Continue to the dome roof area and leave the station from here.

1. Platform 5 and 6 of JR Tokyo Station 2. Descend the stairs in the center of the platform 3. The Marunouchi North Exit ticket gates 4. The North Dome

● To Marunouchi Central Exit 1. Descend either of the two stairs in the center of the platform and head for the Marunouchi Central Exit 2. Continue straight ahead through the Central Passage until you arrive at the brick wall. Turn right from there. 3. Exit the Marunouchi Central Exit ticket gates, just right of the brick wall. 4. Continue straight for a few steps and you’ll find yourself outside immediately.

1. The staircase descending to the Central Passage 2. The western end of the Central Passage 3. The ticket gates of Marunouchi Central Exit 4. The Marunouchi Central Exit seen from the outside

● To Marunouchi South Exit 1. Descend either of the two stairs on the southern end of the platform. 2. After descending the stairs, head towards Marunouchi South Exit. 3. Go straight through the South Passage and pass through the Marunouchi South Exit ticket gates. 4. Continue to the dome roof area and leave the station from here.

1. The stairs at the southern end of the platform 2. Opposite of the stairs is an elevator 3. The Marunouchi South Exit ticket gates 4. Marunouchi South Exit from the outside

● To Marunouchi Underground North Exit 1. Follow the signs of “Marunouchi Central Exit” and descend either of the two stairs at the center of the platform. 2. Follow the Central Passage towards the Marunouchi Central Exit. 3. As you arrive at the western end of the Central Passage, turn right and take the passage on the right-hand side of the Marunouchi Central Exit ticket gates. 4. Take the stairs or escalator marked with “ Narita Express.” 5. Turn right after going down the stairs. 6. Pass the corner shop called KIOSK to your right. 7. Go straight while following the signs saying “Marunouchi Underground North Exit.” 8. After passing the bookstore on the right-hand side, you’ll arrive at the Marunouchi Underground North Exit ticket gates.

tourist spot near tokyo station

● To Marunouchi Underground Central Exit 1. Follow the signs of “Marunouchi Central Exit” and descend either of the two stairs at the center of the platform. 2. Follow the Central Passage towards the Marunouchi Central Exit. 3. As you arrive at the western end of the Central Passage, turn right. 4. Pass in front of the Marunouchi Central Exit ticket gates and turn left immediately. 5. Take the stairs or escalator marked with “ Narita Express.” 6. Turn right after going down the stairs and continue straight through the passage. 7. Go straight while following the signs saying “Marunouchi Underground Central Exit.” 8. After passing the bookstore on the right-hand side, you’ll arrive at the Marunouchi Underground Central Exit ticket gates.

tourist spot near tokyo station

● To Marunouchi Underground South Exit 1. Follow the signs of “Marunouchi Central Exit” and descend either of the two stairs at the center of the platform. 2. Follow the Central Passage towards the Marunouchi Central Exit. 3. As you arrive at the western end of the Central Passage, turn right and enter the passage on the right of the Marunouchi Central Exit ticket gates. 4. Take the stairs or escalator marked with “ Narita Express.” 5. Turn left after descending the stairs. 6. Pass by the elevator going to platform 3 and 4. 7. Follow the signs saying “GRANSTA MARUNOUCHI” and continue straight. 8. You’ll arrive at the Marunouchi Underground South Exit.

tourist spot near tokyo station

East Exit Directions: to the JR Express Bus Terminal and Daimaru Tokyo!

The main exits on JR Tokyo Station ’s east side are, from north to south, the Yaesu North Exit, the Yaesu Central Exit, and the Yaesu South Exit on the ground floor. If you leave the Yaesu Exit ticket gates on the ground floor and go to the left (towards north), you’ll also find the Nihonbashi Exit. The JR Express Bus Terminal is right in front of the Nihonbashi Exit, so it’s good to keep in mind. First Avenue Tokyo Station is right in front of the Yaesu Underground Central ticket gates. Continue straight ahead and you’ll get to the Yaesu underground shopping area. Here are the directions from JR Yamanote Line bound for Shinagawa and Shibuya (outbound) on platform 4 to each exit: ● To the Yaesu North Exit 1. Descend the stairs at the northern end of the platform. 2. Turn right after the stairs. 3. Continue straight ahead, following the North Passage and pass through the Yaesu North Exit ticket gates. 4. You’ll arrive at the Yaesu North Exit and Daimaru Tokyo directly connected to it.

1. JR Tokyo Station’s platform 5 and 6 2. Descend the stairs 3. The Yaesu North Exit ticket gates 4. The Yaesu North Exit

● To the Yaesu Central Exit 1. Descend either of the two stairs at the center of the platform and follow the signs of “Yaesu Central Exit.” 2. Continue straight ahead through the Central Passage, cross over towards the JR Information Center and continue going straight (be careful to not take the stairs down to the first basement floor). 3. Pass through the Yaesu Central Exit ticket gates. 4. Turn left right after the ticket gates, then go right again and straight ahead to go outside via the Yaesu Central Exit.

1. Descend the stairs at the center of the platform 2. The JR Information Center 3. The Yaesu Central Exit ticket gates 4. The Yaesu Central Exit

● To the Yaesu South Exit 1. Descend either of the two stairs at the south end of the platform and follow the signs of “Yaesu South Exit.” 2. Continue straight ahead through the South Passage, lined by bento shops and confectioneries. 3. Go down a short staircase (or slope) and pass through the Yaesu South Exit ticket gates. 4. Go straight ahead to arrive at the Yaesu South Exit.

1. The stairs at the southern end of the platform 2. The South Passage 3, the Yaesu South Exit ticket gates 4. The Yaesu South Exit

● To the Yaesu Underground Central Exit 1. Descend either of the two stairs at the center of the platform, following the signs of “Yaesu Central Exit.” 2. Continue straight ahead through the Central Passage, cross over towards the JR Information Center and pass it to the left. 3. Go down the stairs to the first basement level. 4. You’ll see the Yaesu Underground Central Exit ticket gates.

1. The information sign showing the route to the Yaesu Central Exit 2. The JR Information Center 3. The staircase to the first basement floor 4. The Yaesu Underground Central Exit

● To the Nihonbashi Exit 1. Pass through the Yaesu North Exit ticket gates. 2. Go straight ahead and turn left right after JR Tokai Tours. 3. Follow the signs saying “Nihonbashi Exit” and go straight ahead. 4. Leave the station via the Nihonbashi Exit. (The arrival area for JR Express buses is here.)

1. The Yaesu North Exit ticket gates 2. The North Exit passage, turn left just before Daimaru Tokyo 3. The passage towards the Nihonbashi Exit 4. The Nihonbashi Exit

Transfers from Tokyo Station

Starting from JR’s Yamanote Line, a convenient line used by numerous tourists, let’s take a look at transfers to Keio Electric Railway, Tokyu lines, and Tokyo Metro lines. ● JR Yamanote Line → Tokyo Metro Marunouchi Line 1. Take the stairs to go down from the platform, then go down again to the first basement level via the stairs next to the Marunouchi Central Exit and head towards the Marunouchi Underground Central Exit. 2. Pass through the Marunouchi Underground Central Exit ticket gates. 3. Continue straight through the passage. 4. You’ll arrive at Tokyo Metro’s Marunouchi Line’s ticket gates and ticket area.

1. Take the stairs to go down from the platform, then go down again to the first basement level via the stairs next to the Marunouchi Central Exit and head towards the Marunouchi Underground Central Exit 2. Pass through the Marunouchi Underground Central Exit ticket gates 3. Continue straight through the passage 4. You’ll arrive at Tokyo Metro’s Marunouchi Line’s ticket gates and ticket area.

● JR Yamanote Line → Tokyo Metro Tozai Line 1. Take the stairs to go down from the platform, then go down again to the first basement level via the stairs next to the Marunouchi Central Exit and head towards the Marunouchi Underground North Exit. 2. Pass through the Marunouchi Underground North Exit ticket gates. 3. Turn right after leaving the ticket gates behind. 4. Enter the passage marked with “For Otemachi.” 5. Keep an eye on the lockers on the left and continue heading straight through the passage. 6. Go down via the escalator or take the stairs. 7. You’ll arrive at Tokyo Metro Otemachi Station. 8. You’ll arrive at the Tokyo Metro Tozai Line ticket gates.

tourist spot near tokyo station

● JR Yamanote Line → JR Keiyo Line 1. descend the stairs on the platform and head toward Yaesu South Exit. 2. Continue along the South Passage toward Yaesu South Exit. Head to the right, following the signs of “Keiyo Line / Musashino Line.” 3. Continue through Keiyo Street towards the Keiyo Line. 4. Go down via escalator at the end of the passage. 5. Continue straight on the three moving walkways. 6. Descend the stairs and turn right. 7. Look for the signs saying “Keiyo Line / Musashino Line” and take the escalator to the third basement level. 8. Confirm whether it is platform 1 and 2 or platform 3 and 4, then descend the stairs to the fourth basement floor.

tourist spot near tokyo station

Taking the Keiyo Line from Tokyo Station to Tokyo Disney Resort

Platform 1 and 2, where both JR Keiyo Line and Musashino Line depart

Maihama Station is the closest station to Tokyo Disney Resort. It’s only a 4-minute walk to Tokyo Disneyland and the station of the Tokyo Resort Liner can be reached in just 2 minutes. Maihama Station is served by JR’s Keiyo Line which connects Tokyo Station with Soga Station in Chiba Prefecture . From Tokyo Station , it takes about 16 minutes with a regular train and 13 minutes with an express train. The Keiyo Line platform is on the south side of Tokyo Station , located on the fourth basement floor, so transfer from the Yamanote Line or Chuo Line will take you about 10 to 15 minutes. Please see “JR Yamanote Line → JR Keiyo Line” above.

  • Area Tokyo Station
  • Category Other Sightseeing
  • How To: Transportation

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  • Tokyo Tourist Information Center - Online Tourist Guide

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Updated: February 1, 2024

Consult us about your trip free-of-charge from wherever you like, such as at home or your destination.

The Tokyo Tourist Information Center provides tourist information online to visitors to Tokyo from Japan or abroad. This service allows you to receive tourist information in a variety of languages from wherever you like such as at home or your destination, and it is provided free-of-charge to all travelers visiting Tokyo from other parts of Japan or abroad. All communications are done online, so you can easily access this service even from overseas.

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User guide (PDF)

Please select the operating system. The online tourist guide user guide (PDF) will then be displayed.

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1 Tokyo and nationwide tourist information

Similar to the Tokyo Tourism Information Center, the online tourist guide introduces tourist spots and routes in Tokyo and all across Japan and provides a guide to access and accommodation information. The four languages of Japanese, English, Chinese, and Korean are supported and, provided that you have an Internet connection, you can access this service from anywhere in the world. It is extremely useful for getting information about your destination before departure.

<Languages> Japanese, English, Chinese, Korean <Hours> English & Japanese: 24 hours a day (year-round) Chinese & Korean: 7:00-22:00 (year-round) To contact the service outside of hours, use the email address below. Inquiries will be addressed in the order in which they are received. info@tokyo-tourism.jp Note: Service hours are subject to change. <System requirements> The supported browsers are shown below. If you use anything other than the below systems or browsers, video and telephone call connections may not be possible.

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Q: Is there a charge to access online tourist guide?

A: No fees are charged for the consultation service. You are expected to provide the communication system yourself.

Q: I cannot access the dedicated website.

A: Please ensure you are using a supported browser.

Q: The call was connected, but I cannot hear the operator's voice.

A: Please check the speaker volume of your earphone microphone or communication terminal.

Q: The call was connected, but the operator cannot hear my voice.

A: Please check the settings of your earphone microphone or communication terminal. *Earphones or communication terminals without a microphone function cannot be used.

Q: Do you support any languages other than Japanese, English, Chinese or Korean?

A: Only those 4 languages are supported.

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Livecall service terms of use (extract) points to note when using this service.

These Points to Note are for using Tourist Information Center’s online tourist guide service.

  • Not all languages are offered. (Available languages are displayed.)
  • This service is for instruction and introduction, and reservations or sales of any kind are not conducted.
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  • When using an iPhone or iPad, please download the special app. Tapping the connect button will automatically take you to the Apple Store(System requirements: iOS 8.0 and above)
  • Using Tokyo Tourist Information Center’s online tourist guide service means that you have agreed to the LiveCall Terms of Use.

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The following is the Terms of Service that govern the use of LiveCall service (“the Service”).

  • Using the Service, you agree to read, understand and comply with the Terms of Service. You shall not use the Service if you do not agree to the Terms of Service.
  • The Service provider company shall be able to change the Terms of Service and the information published therein at any time without notice. The Service provider company may make improvements, changes, modifications, or cancellation of the contents, programs or product information of the Service without notice at any time.
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  • The handling of customer information provided when using the Service is in accordance with the Bureau and Service provider company's privacy policy.

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The Service provider company does not make any guarantees concerning the following items.

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Please see the below URLs for introductions regarding the Bureau and the Service provider company. Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau:  https://www.tcvb.or.jp/en/ The Service provider company: https://livecall.jp/

The Tokyo Tourist Information Center has 5 different locations in the Tokyo area. Be sure to drop into one when visiting Tokyo. Please refer to this site “ Tokyo Tourism Information Center ” for details.

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Everything you need to know about getting around Tokyo

David McElhinney

Mar 23, 2024 • 11 min read

tourist spot near tokyo station

People are always on the move in Tokyo and there are many transportation options to get around the city © JohnnyGreig / Getty Images

Given that Tokyo is the most populated city on earth, it needs a transport system that's up to the task of moving millions of people around daily.

Fortunately, the public transportation in Japan's capital is efficient, reliable, clean and generally safe – it makes getting around the region a breeze.

Of most use to travelers is the train and subway system, which is simple to navigate thanks to English signage and color-coded lines – even if some large stations, most notably Shinjuku, can be a maze for the uninitiated. 

But don’t feel obliged to use trains for every journey. Despite unpredictable traffic patterns, buses tend to be equally punctual and can be useful for short journeys in quieter suburbs.

Tokyo’s relatively flat topography also means cycling and walking don’t require too much of a sweat, and allow you to explore neighborhoods you’d otherwise bypass on the underground.

And if you want to combine your commute with sightseeing, take to the river on one of Tokyo’s beetle-like water buses, which travel between mainland Tokyo and the reclaimed islands of Tokyo Bay. This is everything you need to know about getting around Tokyo.

White, high speed bullet train with motion blur

Tokyo's trains and subway system get you around quickly

Tokyo’s extensive rail network includes Japan Railways (JR) lines, a subway system and private commuter lines that depart in every direction for the suburbs like spokes on a wheel. Journeys that require transfers between lines run by different operators cost more than journeys that use a single operator’s lines. 

Major transit hubs include Tokyo, Shinagawa, Shibuya, Shinjuku, Ikebukuro and Ueno stations — all connected via the JR Yamanote Line that circles the Imperial Palace , Tokyo’s central point.

Trains arrive and depart precisely on time and are generally clean and pleasant, though they get uncomfortably crowded during rush hours and late at night (for a short window in the morning and early evenings, many trains have women-only carriages).

The city's trains stop running between midnight and 5am (give or take an hour, depending on the line) while many bars, clubs, karaoke rooms and izakaya (gastro pubs) remain in business until the wee hours or even 24/7. It's wise to check when your last train departs or be prepared to find another (more expensive) means of transport home.

The JR network covers the whole country and includes the Shinkansen (bullet train). In Tokyo, the above-ground Yamanote (loop) and the Chūō–Sōbu (central) lines are the most useful. Tickets start at ¥180 and go up depending on how far you travel.

Tokyo has 13 subway lines, nine of which are operated by Tokyo Metro and four by Toei . The lines are color-coded, making navigation fairly simple – although a transfer ticket is required to change between the two networks.

A Pasmo or Suica card makes this process seamless, but either way a journey involving more than one operator comes out costing slightly more. Fares depend on the distance traveled.

A hand holding up a travel pass ticket in front of ticket gate at Tokyo Station.

Grab a transport pass for seamless travel in Tokyo

Referred to generally as IC cards or IC passes, prepaid rechargeable Suica and Pasmo cards work on all city trains, subways and buses (you can also use passes purchased in other regions of Japan, such as the Icoca from western Japan or the Kitaka from Hokkaidō).

Buy these from any touch-screen ticket vending machine in Tokyo (including those at Haneda and Narita airports); most have an English option and the cards are interchangeable. JR stations sell Suica, and subway and independent lines sell Pasmo.

Both require a ¥500 deposit, which is refunded (along with any remaining balance) when you return the pass to any ticket window. Passes can be topped up at any touch-screen ticket-vending machine (not just, for example, at JR stations for Suica passes) in increments of ¥1000.

Unfortunately, a shortage of chips has resulted in a supply failure of the physical cards and they're now hard to find in Tokyo. iPhone users can use a digital IC card through their Apple Pay function and there are tourist-specific cards available at the airports.

These have a much shorter expiry date than the regular cards – 28 days versus 10 years. If you still have an IC card from your last trip to Tokyo, it will work fine if it's less than 10 years old.

If you’re planning a packed day, you might consider getting an unlimited-ride ticket. The Tokyo Subway Ticket allows unlimited rides on both Tokyo Metro and Toei subway lines, with 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour options available.

This pass is only available to foreign travelers on a tourist visa; you’ll need to determine whether the trains you plan to use will be largely JR or metro to get your money’s worth.

Using IC cards is simple: just run them over the card readers at the ticket gates upon entering and exiting. Fares for pass users are slightly less (a few yen per journey) than for paper ticket holders.

A train travels over a bridge above roads with pedestrians, cars and a bus below

See more of Tokyo on a bus

Toei runs an extensive bus network in Tokyo, though it’s only more convenient than the subway when you’re in the outer suburbs or making short inner-city jaunts. A particularly useful bus, the number 06, connects Shibuya , Hiroo and Azabujuban – three popular cosmopolitan neighborhoods. 

Fares are ¥210 for adults and ¥110 for children; there are no transfer tickets. Pay by IC pass or deposit your fare into the box as you enter the bus – if your pass is out of credit, you can charge it at the front of the bus (the word for “charge” is cha-ji).

There’s also a change machine by the driver’s seat that accepts ¥1000 notes. Most buses have digital signage that switches between Japanese and English; otherwise, listen for your stop. Signal the bus to stop in advance of the approaching stop by pushing one of the buttons near your seat.

Japan is a global leader in hydrogen energy, one of the world’s cleanest energy sources, which emits only wastewater (even if some question the technology’s cost-effectiveness).

Some 85 hydrogen fuel cell buses have been in operation since March 2021, traveling primarily between Tokyo Station and the Tokyo Big Sight  convention center in Ariake, while passing through the popular Yurakucho, Ginza and Tsukiji neighborhoods.

The local government is aiming to have more than 300 hydrogen buses in operation by 2030.

Get a fresh view from a water bus

Tokyo’s “water buses” look like robotic beetles skimming across the placid waters of its eastern river networks.

Thanks to their glass-walled exteriors, they’re a great option for taking in the sights of Tokyo Bay while traveling between Asakusa and the likes of Odaiba, Toyosu and Hama-rikyū Gardens .

Journeys will cost between ¥280 and ¥2600, depending on distance, and are generally more comfortable than their terrestrial public transport counterparts.

Tokyo taxi turning right in a busy road, traffic ahead has motion blur, the shops have neon billboards

After a late night out consider a taxi

Getting a taxi in Tokyo only makes economic sense for short distances or when in groups of four – unless you’re stranded during the lull in nightly train operations.

All cabs run by the meter, with fares starting at ¥500 for the first 2km (1.2 miles) and then rising by ¥100 for every 255m (836ft) you travel or for every 90 seconds spent in traffic.

When traveling longer distances, this starts to add up at a rather alarming rate, especially when you factor in the nighttime surcharge of 20% between 10pm and 5am, and potential highway tolls. 

Drivers rarely speak English, though most taxis have navigation systems. Have your destination written down in Japanese – or, better yet, a business card with an address.

Most taxis now also take credit cards and IC passes; since the pandemic began many have introduced automated payment systems attached to screens on the back of the main passenger seat. 

Train stations and hotels have designated taxi stands. In the absence of a stand, you can hail a cab from the street by standing on the curb and sticking your arm out; there are typically far more taxis roaming the streets than punters hailing them down.

Local tips for using cabs and finding addresses

Japanese cab doors are automatic, and even after years of residence in the city, many foreigners find themselves struggling to open self-opening doors. Exercise patience! 

Once in the taxi, you’ll notice how difficult Tokyo’s streets are to navigate, even for locals. Only the biggest streets have official names, and they don’t figure into addresses. Instead, addresses are derived from districts, blocks and building numbers.

Central Tokyo is divided first into ku (wards – Tokyo has 23 of them), which in turn are divided into chō or machi (towns) and then into numbered districts called chōme (pronounced “cho-may”). Subsequent numbers in an address refer to blocks within the chōme and buildings within each block.

Since it’s nearly impossible to find your destination using the address alone, smartphones with navigation apps have been a real boon.

Many restaurants and venues also have useful maps on their websites. If you get lost, police officers at kōban (police boxes) have maps and can help with directions, though few speak English.

At the very least, they should be able to steer you back to the nearest train station from where you can try again. Many businesses have also started using the What3Words app, which has divided the world into 3m-square grids to help users pinpoint a specific location.

Uber does operate in Tokyo but it's not cheaper 

Uber arrived in Tokyo in May 2018, though its boutique chauffeur service, Uber Black, dates back to 2015. The ride-share company has partnered with three local taxi operators to provide rides in Tokyo’s central business district and other busy areas.

Even though Tokyo strictly regulates ride-sharing apps, other competitors are entering the market, such as the city’s premier taxi app, JapanTaxi (which isn’t particularly tourist-friendly).

Given Uber’s unpredictable availability and a pricing structure similar to that of street cabs, there are few occasions where using the app is merited.

Young guy with backpack riding a bike at evening time on Shibuya crossing in Tokyo, Japan

Cycling in Tokyo

At first glance, Tokyo doesn’t seem like a bicycle-friendly city: dedicated lanes are almost nonexistent on major thoroughfares, cyclists often come up against pedestrian overpasses that need to be scaled (though a few have ramps for walking bikes up and down), and you’ll see no-parking signs for bicycles everywhere. 

Despite all this, you’ll also see plenty of pedaling locals. This is because Tokyo is a largely flat city, and much bike-friendlier if you’re cycling through city parks , in residential neighborhoods, along the river promenades near Tokyo Bay or around the maze of backstreets.

Cogi Cogi is a bike-sharing system with ports around the city, including some hostels.

Despite instructions in English, the system is a little complicated to use: you’ll need to download an app, register a credit card and have a wi-fi connection on the go to sync with the ports.

Chuo Street in Tokyo at night, very busy with traffic in motion, shops and signs are lit up

Think twice about hiring a car

Considering the traffic, the confusing and often excruciatingly narrow roads, and the ridiculous cost of parking, it’s best not to use a car to get around Tokyo; even most Tokyoties don’t bother owning a vehicle.

Day trips can easily be done by public transport, though renting a car will expand your options and allow you to explore regions rarely visited by the touring masses. 

For rentals, you will need an International Driving Permit, which must be arranged in your own country before you leave; certain conditions must be met (see the Japan Automobile Federation website for further information).

Rental companies with branches around the city include Nippon Rent-a-Car and Toyota Rent-a-Car . 

Local tips for car rentals in Tokyo

Rental cars are generally affordable, especially when the cost is split among passengers, and are economical with respect to gas mileage.

That said, highway tolls in Japan can be exorbitant – driving to Osaka and back, for example, would cost over ¥29,000 in toll fees, mitigating some of the money saved on skipping the bullet train. 

Also be sure to pay the extra fee for damage insurance. In the event that you are in an accident, no matter how small, you must first call the police to record the incident before the vehicle is returned to the shop or you’ll risk incurring hair-raising financial penalties.

Rental operators are fairly unsympathetic to those who don’t follow these rules; it’s worth bringing a translator to go through the small print to avoid any such mishaps.

Accessible transportation in Tokyo

Tokyo is working hard to improve universal access – or bariafurī (“barrier-free”; バリアフリー) in Japanese. It’s estimated that at least 95% of Tokyo’s approximately 700 train stations have step-free facilities and accessible toilets, while 94% of buses are also wheelchair accessible. 

Newer buildings have wheelchair-access ramps, more and more subway stations are introducing elevators (look for signs on the platform as not all exits have them), and yellow braille lines direct visually impaired passengers through major stations and guide them safely along platforms.

Train-station staff will also help wheelchair-using passengers on and off trains with a temporary slope.

A fair number of hotels, from the higher end of midrange and up, offer a barrier-free room or two (be sure to book well in advance). Note that what constitutes “barrier-free” is not always consistent, so check the details carefully.

Larger attractions, department stores and shopping malls tend to have wheelchair-accessible restrooms. If you need a wheelchair (車いす; “ kuruma isu ”) while in Tokyo, hotel staff can help you rent one.

Accessible Japan is the best resource for accessible travel. It also produces an ebook with lots of detail. Click here to download Lonely Planet’s free Accessible Travel guide.

This article was first published Apr 8, 2021 and updated Mar 23, 2024.

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27 Best Places to Take Pictures in Tokyo

From the well-known Tokyo tourist photo spots to picture locations only a Japanese local would know, this is the guide for every traveling photographer.

Learn | Photo Locations | By Mark Condon

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This guide to the best places to take pictures in Tokyo is based on my 7 years living in Japan.

Being immersed in Japanese culture and speaking the language fluently allowed me a unique perspective on Tokyo and its people.

Japan is a place where ancient culture and modernism meet, and this incredible city is a photographer’s dream.

I’ve included the well-known Tokyo photo spots every tourist needs to visit and also the ‘secret’ locations only a local would know.

This photo guide is useful to anyone who wants to take memorable and unique photos of their trip to the Land of the Rising Sun.

Hajimarimashou-ka? (Shall we get started?)

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Table of Contents

The Well-Known (But Unmissable) Places to Take Pictures in Tokyo

1. shibuya scramble crossing.

A crowd of people crossing a busy street in tokyo.

The Shibuya Crossing is a popular spot for  street photography  as one of the world’s busiest intersections.

It’s an excellent place to take a photo of the immense crowds that walk the streets of Tokyo every day. It’s also free, so you can watch the crowds and take as many photos as you want of the amazing views.

You’ll be fascinated by the number of people and how they all cross and walk in harmony without bumping into each other in one of the world’s busiest pedestrian crossing spots.

Best Time to Visit

Unlike other places that are best avoided when crowded, you can take better photos of the Shibuya Crossing from 6 pm to 9 pm, when everyone is going home.

You can take a photo in the morning too (see below tip), but the bright lights after dark will create the perfect backdrop for your shots.

For an iconic photo, I recommend you find a spot at the Starbucks Shibuya Tsutaya (a music/video rental shop), opposite Shibuya Station, where you can take a shot from the second floor of the iconic Shibuya Crossing.

You can also go up the Shibuya Sky the highest building in the district, and take a photo from the Sky Edge.

I recommend you go there early in the morning to get a seat at Tsutaya near the window (there’s only very limited seating here).

This way, you can also get some photos of the iconic Japanese ‘salary-men’ as they scurry to work.

While you’re in Shibuya, you should also get a photo of the Hachiko Statue , a popular meeting point and a great place for people-watching.

  • Famous Japanese photographers you should know

2. Gyoen Park

A pond with cherry trees and a skyscraper in the background.

Credit: Kakidai, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Located in the Shinjuku area, the Gyoen Park stands with its amazing cherry blossom trees.

This park was once kept for the Imperial Family but has been open to the public since the 1940s.

The Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden is the number one destination for landscape photographers, especially in the spring when the cherry blossom trees are in bloom.

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The photos symbolize the Sakura Season, or cherry blossom season, which symbolizes the beauty of life and death.

Be ready with an admission fee of 500 yen.

Although it’s best to visit Gyoen Park in Spring to fully experience the cherry blossom in bloom, you can visit it at any time of the year to take photos of its unique trees and ponds.

Head to the park at dusk for an unbelievable sunset photo with the cityscape in the background.

Gyoen Park is home to three different gardens. The first one is the Japanese Garden with its pond, wooden bridges, and several pavilions like the Kyu Goryotei.

The second one is the English Garden, where trees are left to grow naturally, and you can see the blooming cherry blossom trees. Finally, you can head to the French Garden, built to imitate the royal gardens in Paris.

Walk around the park to find an interesting spot to take a photo, or head to the greenhouse, where you can find rare tropical flowers.

If you manage to visit Tokyo in Spring, you should try and experience ‘ Hanami ‘, a fun ‘picnic’ of sorts that brings thousands of Japanese to eat and drink together under the cherry blossom trees.

However, you’ll need to snag a spot very early in the morning – bring a picnic rug and be prepared with enough provisions (and sunscreen) to wait until your friends arrive later in the day.

Photos in Tokyo wouldn’t be complete without some rosy-faced Japanese locals enjoying Hanami.

  • Where is the most photographed place in the world?

3. Tokyo Tower

An asian style building with a clock tower in the background.

If you want to take a photo of a famous Tokyo landmark, nothing will beat a photo of the Tokyo Tower.

This communication and observation centre stands in the middle of Minato City and closely resembles the Eiffel Tower, but it’s white and red and actually 3 metres taller !

It’s the number one choice if you want to take a shot of an outstanding landmark with the city of Tokyo in the backdrop.

The best time to take a photo of Tokyo Tower is at night when it’s brightly lit to create contrast with the dark night sky. The officials choose different colours to correspond to various occasions.

Go to the Mori Tower in Roppongi Hills or the Fuji TV building to take a clear shot of the Tokyo Tower, or find a spot on Sakuradadori Street to create a photo composition of the city with the tower in the centre of your picture.

4. Harajuku

A city street in tokyo, japan.

If you’re an anime lover or fan of cosplay , you’ve probably heard about the Harajuku area.

Harajuku is where you can take photos of weird Tokyo fashion trends, incredible styles, and unbelievable costumes.

You can also take shots of the unique shops and residential areas in the back streets, known locally as ‘Ura-Hara’ (behind Harajuku).

Most cosplay stores have glass fronts, so you can take your time to reframe an exciting photo composition.

You can also find food stores that sell animal-shaped ice cream and giant cotton candy, and you can take Instagram-worthy food shots.

During the two main rush hours (7.30~9.30am and 5.30~7.30pm), you’ll find this popular Tokyo photo spot fascinating, if a little overwhelming!

Take a walk from the Harajuku Station to the entrance of Takeshita Street, one of the best spots to grab a lively photo of this area.

You can also head to the Tokyu Plaza Omotesando shopping centre, where the trees are incorporated into the building’s design to filter light and make the place more suitable for photography.

On the sixth floor, you can find Starbucks to enjoy a drink and take a photo from the viewing deck.

Tokyu Plaza itself is an excellent place to take futuristic photos of the world’s anime capital.

Although the Japanese are mostly shy and reserved, don’t be afraid to approach them to ask for a photo.

Nowhere is this more true than in Harajuku, where the young dress to be noticed – even if they would never admit it!

You can approach Tokyo locals with your camera or smartphone in hand. Just smile and ask for a photo.

Most will understand if you ask in English, but if you want to speak the lingo, just ask ‘Shasshin ii desu ka?’ while pointing to your camera.

A man riding a bicycle down a street in tokyo.

Visiting Asakusa Station while heading to the Senso-ji Temple feels like a trip back in time.

The neighbourhood still shows the remnants of ancient history with some street signs from the Edo period.

You can take shots of the traditional tea houses, covered streets, and small restaurants, which fill the spots between modern buildings.

Like the nearby temple, the Asakusa area can get extremely crowded during the day. This is why it’s best to visit it early in the morning or after sunset.

However, if you want to take a photo of the crowds who walk down the streets and markets of Japan, you can visit it any time.

You can literally head anywhere for an amazing street shot. For an aerial view, head to the eighth floor of the Asakusa Cultural Center, and you can take a photo of the traditional area.

Remember that if you want to take a picture of any popular Tokyo photo spot without all the tourists, one option is to set your camera up on a tripod, attach an ND filter, and shoot a long exposure.

By experimenting with the exposure duration, you can make any moving people ‘invisible’.

6. Senso-ji Temple

A woman in a kimono holding a red umbrella.

There are more than 4,000 temples and shrines in Tokyo, but the Senso-ji Temple is one of the most famous.

Senso-ji temple was built about 1300 years ago, making it the oldest Buddhist temple in Tokyo.

As well as the beauty of the main hall, you can take photos of the surrounding market with its traditional Japanese lanterns and rickshaws.

The temple is open 24 hours a day, but you can only enter the main hall during the day.

If you want to take pictures of the hall and the massive crowds, heading to the temple in the early morning will be your best bet.

You can also take fantastic dusk and sunset photos of the Treasure House Gate or the Thunder Gate.

You can stand in the main hall’s balcony to take photos of the surrounding area or at the Thunder Gate to take pictures of the sunrise.

The five-level pagoda is one of the few standing in Tokyo today and will also be the central object of an iconic photo.

7. Omoide Yokocho

A black and white photo of a man standing in a doorway.

Also known as Memory Lane, this street offers a great insight into old Tokyo, with traditional shops and lantern-lined pathways.

You can take outstanding shots of the famous izakayas and bars with their paper lamps and wooden fronts. You can also take photos of traditional food, drinks, and people who enjoy both.

The stalls are small, so you want to arrive in the early evening to be able to grab a bite and take time to think about your photo composition. Once it gets darker, the traditional Japanese paper lanterns will light up to fill your shot with magic.

Wherever you stand, you can take a shot that captures the essence of this spot. But be quick because the street can quickly fill with people, and some may not like to have their pictures taken.

However, if you’re polite and ask for their consent, they might not mind being part of your Tokyo photo composition!

8. Golden Gai

Two people walking down a street with umbrellas.

After visiting the Omoide Yokocho area, head to the nearby Golden Gai, a small district made up of six alleys where you can find unique Instagrammable spots.

The twisting tiny streets are home to Tokoy’s smallest drinking dens, known as Iza-kaya. Some spots are big enough to accommodate only two people at a time!

Golden Gai is an excellent reminder of the city’s history, as it’s located right in the middle of the modern skyscrapers. You can take a photo that captures the rich history with the futuristic neon lights in the background.

After sunset, this area begins to come to life, and visiting it at night guarantees that you can create an exciting photo composition for the perfect shot.

You can grab a photo of the area while enjoying your drink or wait for some pedestrians to fill your shot with life. There are endless opportunities for an outstanding Tokyo city view in this area.

Stick around for long enough in Golden Gai and you’ll see men in suits ushering passers-by (usually salary-men) into bars and other shadier establishments.

While I don’t recommend asking to get photos of these men, you may want to consider including them as part of your overall street photography composition since they’re unique and iconic to Japan.

It’s also fun to stick around after dark to see the inevitable drunken salary-men and revellers emerge from bars, stumbling around or sleeping in alley-ways!

9. Meiji Jingu Shrine

A group of people walking down a sidewalk with an umbrella.

This is the number one visited Shinto shrine in Tokyo and an excellent spot for a photograph that captures the rich culture, architecture, and people of Tokyo.

You can also take a picture of the saké offerings to the gods.

The Meiji Shrine is the perfect spot for wedding ceremonies and other occasions in the Japanese capital.

You can often capture amazing portraits and panorama pictures that showcase traditional Japanese costumes and rituals.

The Meiji Shrine opens at sunrise and closes at sunset, but you can visit in the morning to avoid the crowds if you want to take some good photos.

If you want to showcase the real spirit of the Japanese culture, you can visit a little bit late, when people gather for ceremonies and prayers.

The Inner Garden iris flowers are in full bloom in June, so you should plan your visit around that time.

There are plenty of places for taking photos of Meiji Shrine. Stand at the entrance to take a great picture of the forested avenue or head inside to take a shot of a wedding ceremony taking place.

Just remember to stay respectful if you’re photographing a Japanese wedding – a long zoom lens is recommended to allow you to keep some distance.

10. Tokyo Dome

Tokyo dome is lit up at night.

Credit: Dick Thomas Johnson, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Statistics show  that baseball is the most-watched sport in Japan, and if you visit the Tokyo Dome during one of the tournaments, you won’t be disappointed.

The iconic dome-shaped stadium hosts several sports events, including the famous Japanese baseball games.

Visiting during one of these events grants you a closer look at the enthusiastic Japanese crowds, marching bands, dancers, and colourful costumes.

In addition to the lively sports shots, you can also take photos of the surrounding Japanese gardens.

Baseball games training starts in February and March, with professional play taking place from March to October. Just check the  Tokyo Dome’s website  for match dates.

Any seat aligned with the centre of the field will give you a good view of the stadium. Upper rows provide better panoramic photos.

11. Yoyogi Park

A pond with a fountain in the middle of it.

Credit: Shinjiro, CC BY 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

If you’re interested in Tokyo landscape photos, then heading to Yoyogi Park should be on your list.

Yoyogi is one of the largest public city parks, and it’s located in the Harajuku District.

Go there on the weekend and you’ll find hundreds of people relaxing in its various forested areas or around the lake.

You can also see cosplay fans showing off their costumes and some rockabilly and hiphop dancers who come to perform and impress the crowds.

This is an excellent Tokyo photo spot despite its popularity with both locals and tourists.

A visit in the springtime guarantees that you’ll be able to capture the beauty of the cherry blossom trees.

You can also visit Yoyogi Park in the autumn (fall) to enjoy the golden hues of the ginkgo tree forest.

Yoyogi is always open and free, and you can head to the park on a Sunday at noon and in the afternoon to take photos.

There are lots of Instagrammable spots to explore around the forest, so wear comfy shoes and make sure to cover as much as you can.

Every Sunday afternoon near the bridge entrance to Yoyogi Park, rockabilly dancing groups put on a show for passersby.

You’ll also see the spill into the adjacent Harajuku area, so be sure to get your camera ready.

12. Odaiba Island

An aerial view of a city with a small island in the water.

Credit: Ronny Siegel, CC BY 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Odaiba is a shopping district on an artificial island in Tokyo Bay. It’s the perfect spot for taking a shot of Tokyo’s skyline and the famous Rainbow Bridge.

You might also be on time for some fireworks displays, which take place every Saturday in December (except December 31st) for 5 minutes.

Whether you head to Odaiba in the morning or evening, you can take wonderful shots of Tokyo’s skyline. It’s well-known as an excellent spot for sunset shots.

You can take photos of Odaiba from the ferry that takes you to the island or from the nearby Rainbow Bridge. You can also take photos of the Statue of Liberty and the nearby beach areas.

If you hire a car in Japan, you can drive over Rainbow Bridge which connects Odaiba to central Tokyo.

While you won’t be able to stop on the bridge to take a photo, as long as you’re in the passenger seat, you can take a shot of a unique perspective of the city.

13. Rainbow Bridge

A bridge over a body of water.

Credit: Gussisaurio, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Overlooking the famous Tokyo Bay, the Rainbow Bridge is an iconic representation of the playfulness of the city.

You can walk along the bridge to find an observation deck to take photos of the ferries, Tokyo Sky Tree, and Odaiba beachfront.

Visiting the bridge at sunset or later in the evening is best to experience the lights at full power.

It might be a little crowded, but this way, you can get better nighttime views of the city’s skyline and tall buildings.

Although there are great views from both sides of the bridge, the north side offers better views. This is where you can take fantastic panorama shots, especially near the Harumi Passenger Ship Terminal, where you can find large passenger ships.

While using a tripod on Rainbox Bridge is forbidden, you’re allowed to use a monopod, so make sure you pack one in order to get a steadier shot of Tokyo harbour after dark.

The Lesser-Known Tokyo Photo Spots (Local Secrets)

A bicycle is parked in front of a japanese shop.

Almost everything on the streets of Tokyo is worthy of a photo | Clay Banks

Once you’ve ticked off all the most popular places to take pictures in Tokyo, it’s time to head to the places only the locals know about.

There are countless hidden streets and lesser-known Tokyo photo spots to uncover if you’re there for a few weeks, but here’s a selection of my favourites to help save you some time:

  • Yanaka Ginza : A nostalgic shopping street that offers a glimpse of Tokyo from decades past. It’s a great place to capture the daily life of locals amidst Showa-era architecture.
  • Gotokuji Temple : Often referred to as the “Cat Temple”, it’s home to countless maneki-neko (beckoning cat) statues. A unique spot that’s both serene and quirky.
  • Todoroki Valley : A surprising natural ravine in the heart of Tokyo. The lush greenery and small stream offer a refreshing contrast to the urban landscape.
  • Sumida Hokusai Museum : While the museum itself is dedicated to the famous ukiyo-e artist, its modern and sleek architecture is a photographer’s delight.
  • Nezu Shrine : While many flock to the more famous Meiji Shrine, Nezu Shrine is a peaceful alternative with beautiful torii gates and traditional architecture.
  • Daikanyama T-Site : A stylish complex with a bookstore, cafes, and modern architecture, it’s a favorite among the city’s trendy crowd.
  • Kagurazaka : With its cobblestone streets and old-world charm, it’s reminiscent of Kyoto and offers a blend of the traditional and modern.
  • The Rooftops of Ginza : Some buildings in Ginza have accessible rooftops that offer a unique vantage point of the bustling district below.
  • Toyosu Fish Market : While Tsukiji was more famous, Toyosu is its modern successor. It’s less frequented by tourists and offers a glimpse into the seafood trade of the city.
  • Kiyosumi Garden : Located in the Koto ward, this traditional Japanese garden is often overshadowed by the more famous ones but offers serene landscapes and beautiful koi ponds.
  • Nakagin Capsule Tower : A unique piece of architecture from the Metabolism movement, this building in Shimbashi is made up of individual capsules. It’s a testament to a futuristic vision from the past.
  • Sankaku Chitai : Located in Sangenjaya, this maze-like area is filled with tiny bars and eateries, reminiscent of Golden Gai but less frequented by tourists.
  • Hakusan Shrine : Located in Bunkyo ward, it’s famous among locals for its hydrangea festival in June but remains relatively unknown to tourists.
  • Tomioka Hachiman Shrine : In the Fukagawa area, this shrine is home to Tokyo’s largest mikoshi (drinking-water shrine) festival but is quiet and peaceful for most of the year.

FAQs about Taking Photos in Tokyo

Is it legal to fly a drone in Tokyo?

Drone operations are prohibited over large cities and crowded public areas, including Tokyo, Yokohama, Osaka, Nagoya and Sapporo in the Kanto region; Fukuoka and Kumamoto in Kyushu; and Sendai in northern Japan.

If you’re not in these areas, tourists may be permitted to fly drones in Japan, but it’s necessary to apply to the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport, and Tourism at least ten days in advance and follow all MLIT regulations and Japanese drone laws.

Is it legal to take street photos in Tokyo without permission?

While it’s generally legal to take street photos in Tokyo, it’s essential to respect people’s privacy. If someone objects to having their photo taken, it’s best to delete the image or avoid taking it in the first place.

Are there any places in Tokyo where photography is strictly prohibited?

Yes, certain areas, especially private properties, temples, and shrines, might have signs prohibiting photography. Always look for signs or ask staff if you’re unsure.

Do I need a permit to shoot with a tripod in public places in Tokyo?

In many busy areas, especially popular tourist spots, using a tripod can be restricted due to the obstruction it might cause. It’s always a good idea to check local regulations or ask local authorities. Usually, a monopod is permitted.

How do Japanese locals generally react to being photographed?

While many Tokyo residents are used to tourists and photographers, it’s always polite to ask for permission if you’re taking a close-up or portrait. A smile and a courteous gesture towards your camera or smartphone camera can go a long way.

How can I respect local customs and traditions while photographing?

Always be aware of your surroundings, especially in religious or sacred places. If in doubt, observe what locals are doing or ask someone. It’s also a good practice to dress modestly and avoid loud or disruptive behaviour.

Is flash photography allowed in museums and indoor attractions?

Most museums and indoor attractions in Tokyo prohibit flash photography to preserve the exhibits. Always check for signs or ask staff before using flash.

Can I photograph the Tsukiji Fish Market?

While the inner market of Tsukiji has moved to Toyosu and has specific photography rules, the outer market remains and is generally more lenient about photography. However, always be respectful of the workers and avoid obstructing their activities.

Best Photo Spots Tokyo | Final Words

An aerial view of a city at night.

Tokyo from the skies | Pawel Nolbert

Anime, technology, skyscrapers, and neon lights might cross people’s minds when someone mentions Japan’s capital city.

However, an avid photographer will always wonder about the best photo spot in Tokyo.

Tokyo is the most populous city in Japan and one of its most famous tourist destinations.

While the city is known for its outstanding historical and cultural spots, some places seem to come from a sci-fi movie.

During your visit to Tokyo, you can take fantastic street photos, shoot photos of ancient Japanese architecture, highlight the beauty of Japanese cuisine, and show people’s respect for the deities.

Everything represents an outstanding photography opportunity, from the city skyline to the city lights, tall buildings, parks, gardens, beaches, ponds, old markets, and narrow streets.

Some of the best Tokyo photo spots can be found on the main streets, while others can be hidden in alleys.

Luckily, there’s no law against taking photos in Japan, but you’re always advised to get permission before taking a picture.

I hope you enjoyed this guide – leave a comment below if you think I’ve missed anywhere in Tokyo that’s great for photos.

All photos unless otherwise indicated were taken by Shotkit writer and photographer Greg Cromie during his travels in Japan.

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Mark Condon is a British wedding photographer and editor of Shotkit. When he’s not taking photos or reviewing the latest camera gear and software, Mark can be found cycling around the northern rivers.

Great list of places to shoot. One of the better articles that I found online

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  3. 10 Free and Cheap Things To Do Around Tokyo Station

    Towards the Yaesu Underground Central Exit of the Station, B1. 2. Mitsubishi Ichigokan Museum. The Mitsubishi Ichigokan Museum is located in the eye-catchingly classic red brick building originally designed by English architect Josiah Condor in 1894 following the end of Japan's national seclusion. It was actually torn down in 1968 but was faithfully reconstructed according to the original ...

  4. Things to Do Near Tokyo Station

    Kitte Marunouchi. Within easy walking distance of the Marunouchi exit of Tokyo Station are a number of attractions. One of them is Kitte Marunouchi. Occupying one underground floor and the first six floors of the Japan Post Tower, Kitte Marunouchi offers a cultural glimpse of Japan and a vast array of shopping and dining options.

  5. Things To Do In And Around Tokyo Station

    2. Shop at Okashi Land. View this post on Instagram. A post shared by OkashiLand (@okashilandhk) Located at First Avenue in Tokyo station, every snack lover should stop by Okashi Land or "The Land of Sweets". This place has certainly earned its name. From chocolates, to candies, to delicious chips, they have it all.

  6. Ultimate Tokyo Station Top 30: Perfect Places for Sightseeing, Dining

    Of course, travel within Tokyo to such areas as Shinjuku, Shibuya, Ueno, and Akihabara, is also easy making this the perfect station to start a journey. From Haneda Airport, it takes about 30 minutes by monorail and train to get to Tokyo Station. From Narita Airport, it takes about 50 minutes by the Narita Express and about 60 minutes by direct ...

  7. A Guide on What to Do Around Tokyo Station Before ...

    Located in central Tokyo and connected to over 15 train lines, Tokyo Station is one of the main transportation hubs in Tokyo. Thanks to it being a boarding point in Tokyo for the shinkansen (bullet train) along with the Ueno and Shinagawa areas, this enormous terminal is also one of the busiest in the world, with people from not just Tokyo, but also from big cities all over Japan traversing ...

  8. [Tokyo] The Best Things to Do around Tokyo Station

    Explore Tokyo's captivating history and modern charm at the iconic Tokyo Station, a masterpiece by Kingo Tatsuno in 1914, nestled in the vibrant Chiyoda Ward. Adjacent to the Imperial Palace Grounds in the Marunochi business district, this railway hub symbolizes architectural magnificence.A testament to resilience, the eastern extension emerged after the 1923 Tokyo earthquake, creating a ...

  9. 10 Things to Do Near the Iconic Tokyo Station

    The Tokyo Station Gallery is an art museum that opened within the Marunouchi station building of Tokyo Station in 1988. The museum mainly features modern artworks and holds exhibitions with concepts based on trains and the like. The exhibition room on the 2F, which, surrounded by the iconic red bricks of the station, is extraordinarily popular.

  10. Tokyo Station 東京駅

    Tokyo Station's traditional exterior hides a wealth of modern shopping and dining. Tokyo Station is a major gateway to the capital for visitors arriving by bullet train or from Narita Airport . The magnificent red-brick facade, built in 1914, gives way to a bustling underground city of train tracks, shops, and restaurants.

  11. 27 Best Things to Do in Tokyo

    Nihon Minka-en Japan Open-air Folk House Museum. Though only 20 minutes by train from central Tokyo, the Nihon Minka-En Japan Open-Air Folk House Museum, located in a suburb of neighboring ...

  12. 10 Best things to do around Tokyo Station with family

    More about —> Picnic at Imperial Palace garden in Tokyo Japan. Imperial palace. The 1st Greener Starbucks Japan at Imperial palace outer park is also good stop-by spot. Starbucks Coffee Kokyo Gaien Wadakura fountain park store (Link to Official website) Address : 3-1 Kokyogaien Chiyoda-ku Tokyo, Japan (Link to Google Map) S.

  13. Tokyo Station

    View photos (6) Tokyo Station (Photo: 潇 文 / Unsplash) With over 3,000 trains passing through every day, Tokyo Station is the busiest station in Japan. It is the fifth-busiest in terms of passengers and even serves as a hub for many regional commuter lines and the Tokyo Metro network. The station covers so much area in fact that it is ...

  14. 5 most useful tourist services and facilities in Tokyo Station

    Baggage Storage + open 9.30am-8pm daily. Gransta Underground North Exit (B1F, inside ticket gates). Tokyo Station Baggage Service Counter open 8.30am-8pm daily (storage 9.30am-8pm). Yaesu South ...

  15. 10 Best Places Near Tokyo Travelers Must Definitely Explore!

    1. Kamakura. Image Source. One of the best and popular places to visit near Tokyo, Kamakura is adorned with all the Kyoto style. From magnificent temples and shrines which brings galore to this little city, there are also some enthralling hiking options. And for the foodie travelers, there are local street food shops which will savour your ...

  16. Exploring Tokyo: 3 Must-Visit Spots around Tokyo Station

    Tokyo Station is a large hub connecting the Japanese capital to all corners of Japan's main island - and beyond. While a lot of people mainly visit the area for the massive station, it has a lot of shops, restaurants, and sightseeing spots to offer that are sure to enrich your trip! Whether you're waiting for a bullet train or feel like exploring beyond the premises of Tokyo Station, we ...

  17. 10 (Almost) Secret Tokyo Hidden Gems You've Never Heard Of

    BONUS: Hikan Inari Shrine. Within one Tokyo hidden gem is another hidden gem! Towards the rear of Asakusa-jinja's grounds lies a tiny shrine measuring 1.5 x 1.4 metres. Called Hikan Inari Shrine, it was built by a local fireman.

  18. Top 25 Easy Day Trips From Tokyo

    4. Hakone. Home to hot springs galore, onsen eggs, mountains, and teahouses, Hakone is one of the most popular day trips from Tokyo. Perfect for a nature-based escape, it has three great hiking trails , as well as gondolas to volcanic valleys and pirate ships that traverse a beautiful lake.

  19. Tokyo Station: 11 Things to do Around Marunouchi

    For Narita Airport to Tokyo Station. There are many more options for you to get to central Tokyo even though Narita airport is quite far away, we have prepared a guide to help you find the most convenient way for you to get to Tokyo station as well as other areas around Tokyo. You can also find your way back from Tokyo Station to Narita Airport using the same modes of transportation.

  20. The Top 10 Day Trip Destinations Within 2 Hours of Tokyo

    3. Mount Fuji (Shizuoka Prefecture / Yamanashi Prefecture) When most people think of Japan, they think of Mount Fuji. Mount Fuji is the tallest mountain in Japan at 3,776 meters in elevation and was registered as a World Heritage Site in 2013. The very same Mount Fuji can be reached from Tokyo in about 2.5 hours.

  21. Time Out Tokyo

    Get discounts on attractions in Tokyo and ride around on the city's trains and buses with the cute Pasmo Passport IC card 5 most useful tourist services and facilities in Tokyo Station

  22. Honest Advice for Where to Stay in Tokyo for First-Time Travellers

    Many articles recommending where to stay in Tokyo Japan will say Shinjuku is the best for first-time visitors, too. However, to offer a different perspective I respectfully disagree. With over 200 exits Shinjuku Station can be quite a challenge to navigate for anyone, even when renting wifi in Japan to aid you.

  23. The Complete Guide to Tokyo Station

    3. Tokyo Station is a historic hot spot Tokyo Station was designed by Tatsuno Kingo, a representative architect of Japan's Meiji area, and was completed in 1914 - the original building now serves as the Tokyo Station Marunouchi Station Building. In 2014, 100 years after the original completion of the characteristic building, thorough reconstruction and restoration works were carried out to ...

  24. Tokyo Tourist Information Center

    The Tokyo Tourist Information Center provides tourist information online to visitors to Tokyo from Japan or abroad. This service allows you to receive tourist information in a variety of languages from wherever you like such as at home or your destination, and it is provided free-of-charge to all travelers visiting Tokyo from other parts of Japan or abroad. All communications are done online ...

  25. How to get around Tokyo

    Tickets start at ¥180 and go up depending on how far you travel. Tokyo has 13 subway lines, nine of which are operated by Tokyo Metro and four by Toei. The lines are color-coded, making navigation fairly simple - although a transfer ticket is required to change between the two networks. A Pasmo or Suica card makes this process seamless, but ...

  26. 27 Best Places to Take Pictures in Tokyo

    9. Meiji Jingu Shrine. This is the number one visited Shinto shrine in Tokyo and an excellent spot for a photograph that captures the rich culture, architecture, and people of Tokyo. You can also take a picture of the saké offerings to the gods.