Properties to customize the Tour

Type: StepType[]

Array of elements to highlight with special info and props.

components?

Type: PopoverComponentsType

Customize granurally each Component inside the Popover .

Available Components and its props

Type: StylesObj & PopoverStylesObj & MaskStylesObj

Prop to customize styles for the different parts of the Mask, Popover and Tour using a function that allows to extend the base styles an take advantage of some state props.

Styles keys and its props available to customize. Refer to Mask docs and Popover docs for its specific styles keys

Type: Padding

Extra space to add between the Mask and the Popover and the highlighted element. A single number coordinates both spaces. Otherwise, passing an Object specifying the Component space.

Type: number | { mask?: ComponentPadding, popover?: ComponentPadding, wrapper?: ComponentPadding }

Calculation is based on padding shorthand syntax (opens in a new tab)

Type: Position

Set the global position value for the Popover in all steps

Type: 'top' | 'right' | 'bottom' | 'left' | 'center' | [number, number] | ((postionsProps: PositionProps, prevRect: RectResult) => Position)

Fixed in case of [number, number] , calculated prefered position in case of string .

setCurrentStep?

Type: Dispatch<React.SetStateAction<number>>

Function to control the Tour current step state.

currentStep?

Type: number

Custom Tour current step state.

disableInteraction?

Type: boolean | ((clickProps: Pick<ClickProps, 'currentStep' | 'steps' | 'meta'>) => boolean)

Disables the ability to click or interact in any way with the Highlighted element on every step.

This option can be overrided on specific steps using stepInteraction prop.

disableFocusLock?

Type: boolean

The Tour uses FocusScope (opens in a new tab) in order to lock the focus iteration inside the Popover when Tour is active. This prop disables this behaviour.

disableDotsNavigation?

Disable interactivity with Dot navigation inside Popover .

disableWhenSelectorFalsy?

If true, don't show tours when selector or document.getElementById(step.selector) is falsy.

disableKeyboardNavigation?

Type: boolean | KeyboardParts[]

Default: false

Disable all keyboard navigation events when true, disable only selected keys when array.

Type: 'esc' | 'left' | 'right'

Type: string

Default: reactour__popover

CSS classname (opens in a new tab) assigned to the Popover

maskClassName?

Default: reactour__mask

CSS classname (opens in a new tab) assigned to the Mask

highlightedMaskClassName?

CSS classname (opens in a new tab) assigned to highlighted part of the Mask . Useful when using disableInteraction .

nextButton?

Type: (props: BtnFnProps) => void

Helper functions to customize the Next button inside Popover , with useful parameters. It is possible to use the base Button and customize the props.

prevButton?

Helper functions to customize the Prev button inside Popover , with useful parameters. It is possible to use the base Button and customize the props.

Type: (target: Element | null) => void

Action fired just after the Tour is open.

beforeClose?

Action fired just before the Tour is closed.

onClickMask?

Type: (clickProps: ClickProps) => void

Function that overrides the default close behavior of the Mask click handler. Comes with useful parameters to play with.

onClickClose?

Function that overrides the default close behavior of the Close icon click handler. Comes with useful parameters to play with.

onClickHighlighted?

Type: (e: MouseEventHandler<SVGRectElement>, clickProps: ClickProps) => void

Click handler for highlighted area. Only works when disableInteraction is active.

Useful in case is needed to avoid onClickMask when clicking the highlighted element.

keyboardHandler?

Type: KeyboardHandler

Function to handle keyboard events in a custom way.

Type: (e: KeyboardEvent, clickProps?: ClickProps, status?: { isEscDisabled?: boolean, isRightDisabled?: boolean, isLeftDisabled?: boolean }) => void

badgeContent?

Type: (badgeProps: BadgeProps) => any

Function to customize the content of the Badge using helper parameters like the current and total steps and if the Tour is transitioning between steps.

showNavigation?

Show or hide the Navigation (Prev and Next buttons and Dots) inside Popover .

showPrevNextButtons?

Show or hide Prev and Next buttons inside Popover .

showCloseButton?

Show or hide the Close button inside Popover .

Show or hide the Badge inside Popover .

Show or hide dots navigation inside Popover .

scrollSmooth?

Activate smooth scroll behavior when steps are outside viewport.

inViewThreshold?

Type: { x?: number, y?: number } | number

Tolerance in pixels to add when calculating if the step element is outside viewport to scroll into view.

accessibilityOptions?

Type: A11yOptions

Configure generic accessibility related attributes like aria-labelledby (opens in a new tab) , aria-label (opens in a new tab) for Close button and if show or hide Dot navigation in screen readers.

Option to navigate and show Navigation in right-to-left mode

String to be assigned to the <mask /> element (otherwise an automatic unique id) of Mask Component

String to be assigned to the <clipPath /> element (otherwise an automatic unique id) of Mask Component

onTransition?

Type: PositionType

Function to control the behavior of Popover when is transitioning/scrolling from one step to another, calculating with Popover next position and previous one.

Type: (postionsProps: PositionProps, prev: RectResult) => 'top' | 'right' | 'bottom' | 'left' | 'center' | [number, number]

ContentComponent?

Type: ComponentType<PopoverContentProps>

Completelly custom component to render inside the Popover .

Type: ComponentType

Default: React.Fragment

Element which wraps the Tour. Useful in case is needed to port the Tour into a Portal (opens in a new tab) .

  • Blessing Krofegha
  • Aug 6, 2020

A Practical Guide To Product Tours In React Apps

  • 13 min read
  • UI , Apps , React
  • Share on Twitter ,  LinkedIn

About The Author

Blessing Krofegha is a Software Engineer Based in Lagos Nigeria, with a burning desire to contribute to making the web awesome for all, by writing and building … More about Blessing ↬

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As stated on Appcues :

“Product tours — sometimes called product walkthroughs — introduce users to a new product and help them find their bearings.”

Usually, when it needs to showcase a new feature or complex UI functionality in a web app, the customer-success team would send a campaign email to all of its users. While this is a great way to create such awareness, some users might not have the opportunity to see the added feature; hence, the purpose of the email would be defeated.

A better way to increase user awareness of a particular feature in a web app is by integrating concise, self-explanatory UI tips, called product tours.

Product tours guide users to “a-ha” moments , or showcase high-value features that are being underused. Product tours can be powerful tools to introduce users to a new product and to help them find their bearings. They can draw attention to product launches, promo offers, and product sales.

But when done wrong, product tours can end up feeling like a backseat driver. And no one likes a backseat driver, do they?

In this tutorial, you’ll learn about what a product tour is and the types of product-tour packages in the React ecosystem, along with their pros and cons.

If you’re building customer-facing products using React, then you might be keen to implement this in your React application. By the end, we’ll have built a product tour for a simple shopping-cart UI using React Joyride .

We won’t go through React and JavaScript’s syntax basics, but you don’t have to be an expert in either of these languages to follow along.

Product Tour Guidelines

Product tours are a tricky aspect of web apps, requiring some user-experience expertise to drive results. I’d recommend going through Appcues’ tips for product tours. The following are a few guidelines to consider.

Never Lecture

Putting a lot of tours on a web page is tempting. But users are usually not keen on long introductory tutorials. They become anxious when they have to ingest a lot of information before being able to use a feature in the app.

Break It Down

Don’t teach everything. Focus on a single feature, and create a tour of two to three steps to showcase that feature. Show many small tours, rather than a single long tour. Prioritize their sequence.

Do you enjoy taking your own tour? How about your teammates? Present the tour in such a way that users will understand. Showcase value, rather than stories.

Now that we know the value of product tours and seen some guidelines for building them, let’s cover some React libraries for product tours and learn how to use them.

There are only a few React-based libraries for implementing tours. Two of the most popular are React Tour and React Joyride .

React Tour has around 1,600 stars on GitHub and is being actively developed. The best use case for React Tour is a simple product tour in which little customization is required. A demo is available.

How It Works

With React Tour, you pass the className selector and content for each step to the component. The library will render the tour’s user interface based on a button click, or after you’ve mounted the component. It’s simple for static pages and UIs:

  • React Tour is best for tours that need little customization.
  • It works well for static content and for dynamic content whose selector labels always exist in the UI.
  • Fans of styled-components might find it interesting because it has a hard dependency on styled-components.
  • If your project has no dependency on styled-components, then you might not find it easy to implement.
  • Your creativity will be limited because it doesn’t support customization.

React Joyride

The other main product-tour library is React Joyride , which has about 3,100 stars on GitHub and is also actively maintained.

We pass the className as a target and the content. The state stores the tour. The Joyride component uses steps as props.

  • Integrating React Joyride in a web app is less rigid than with React Tour, and it has no hard dependency on other libraries.
  • Events and actions are made available, which fosters customization.
  • It’s frequently improved.
  • The UI isn’t as elegant as React Tour’s.

Why React Joyride?

Product tours, especially for really big web apps, require customization , and that sets React Joyride apart from React Tour. The example project we’ll make demands some creativity and customization — hence, we’ll go with React Joyride.

Building A Simple Product Tour

First, we’ll build a simple React tour using the props available to us in React Joyride. Next, we’ll use the useReducer hook to automate the tour’s processes.

Clone the “ standard-tour ” branch in the GitHub repository, or use the web page of your choice, as long as you’re able to follow along.

Install the packages by running npm install .

To start the app, run npm run start .

We’ll be covering the following steps:

  • define the tour’s steps;
  • enable a skip option in each step;
  • change text labels on buttons and links;
  • customize styles like button colors and text alignment.

Then, we’ll add some custom features:

  • autostart the tour;
  • start the tour manually (i.e. with a link or button click);
  • hide the blinking beacon.

The props in React Joyride enable us to perform some basic functionality.

For this tutorial, we’ll build a product tour of the UI shown below:

Define The Tour’s Steps

To begin with, ensure that you’re targeting the particular classNames that will hold the content of the tour on the page — that is, according to whether you’ll be using your UI instead of the shopping-cart UI.

In the component folder, create a Tour.js file, and paste the following code into it. Also, ensure that the target classNames exist in your style sheet. Throughout this article, we’ll tweak the Tour.js component to suit the task at hand.

What we’ve done is simply define our tour’s steps by targeting the classNames that will form the bedrock of our content (the text). The content property is where we define the text that we want to see when the tour starts.

Enable Skip Option in Each Step

A skip option is important in cases where a user isn’t interested in a particular tour. We can add this feature by setting the showSkipButton prop to true , which will skip the remaining steps. Also, the continuous prop comes in handy when we need to show the Next button in each step.

Change Text Labels On Buttons And Links

To change the text labels on either buttons or links, we’ll use the locale prop. The locale prop has two objects, last and skip . We specified our last tour as the End tour , while skip is the Close tour .

Customize Styles, Like Button Colors And Text Alignment

The default color of buttons is red, and text alignment is always set right. Let’s apply some custom styles to change button colors and align text properly.

We see in our code that the styles prop is an object. It has other objects with unique values, including:

  • tooltipContainer Its key is textAlign , and its value is left .
  • buttonNext Its key is backgroundColor , and its value is green .
  • buttonBack Its key is marginRight , and its value is 10px .
  • locale Its keys are last and skip , and its values are End Tour and Close Tour , respectively.

The library exposes some props to use on our elements in place of the default elements, some of which are:

  • beaconComponent
  • tooltipComponent

We’ve seen how to create a product tour and how to customize it using the various props of Joyride.

The problem with props, however, is that, as your web app scales and you need more tours, you don’t just want to add steps and pass props to them. You want to be able to automate the process by ensuring that the process of managing tours is controlled by functions, and not merely props . Therefore, we’ll use useReducer to revamp the process of building tours.

In this segment, we are going to take control of the tour by using actions and events , made available by the library through a callback function.

To make this process feel less daunting, we’ll break this down into steps, enabling us to build the tour in chunks.

The complete source code is available, but I’d advise you to follow this guide, to understand how it works. All of our steps will be done in the Tour.js file in the components folder.

Define the Steps

In this first step, we define our steps by targeting the appropriate classNames and setting our content (text).

Define the Initial State

In this step, we define some important states , including:

  • Set the run field to false , to ensure that the tour doesn’t start automatically.
  • Set the continuous prop to true , because we want to show the button.
  • stepIndex is the index number, which is set to 0 .
  • The steps field is set to the TOUR_STEPS that we declared in step 1.
  • The key field makes the tour re-render when the tour is restarted.

Manage The State With Reducer

In this step, using a switch statement when case is START , we return the state and set the run field to true . Also, when case is RESET , we return the state and set stepIndex to 0 . Next, when case is STOP , we set the run field to false , which will stop the tour. Lastly, when case is RESET , we restart the tour and create a new tour.

According to the events ( start , stop , and reset ), we’ve dispatched the proper state to manage the tour.

Listen to the Callback Changes and Dispatch State Changes

Using the exposed EVENTS , ACTIONS , and STATUS labels offered by React Joyride, we listen to the click events and then perform some conditional operations.

In this step, when the close or skip button is clicked, we close the tour. Otherwise, if the next or back button is clicked, we check whether the target element is active on the page. If the target element is active, then we go to that step. Otherwise, we find the next-step target and iterate.

Autostart the Tour With useEffect

In this step, the tour is auto-started when the page loads or when the component is mounted, using the useEffect hook.

Trigger The Start Button

The function in this last step starts the tour when the start button is clicked, just in case the user wishes to view the tour again. Right now, our app is set up so that the tour will be shown every time the user refreshes the page.

Here’s the final code for the tour functionality in Tour.js :

We’ve seen how to build a product tour in a web UI with React. We’ve also covered some guidelines for making product tours effective.

Now, you can experiment with the React Joyride library and come up with something awesome in your next web app. I would love to hear your views in the comments section below.

  • Documentation , React Joyride
  • “ Seven Exceptional Product Tours, and the Best Practices They Teach Us ”, Morgan Brown, Telepathy
  • “ The Ultimate Guide to Product Tours and Walkthroughs ”, Margaret Kelsey, Appcues

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Find React Tour Examples and Templates

Use this online react-tour playground to view and fork react-tour example apps and templates on codesandbox. click any example below to run it instantly or find templates that can be used as a pre-built solution.

React tour with Dialog Material UI

Guide your users through a tour of your app.

Accessibility.

Shepherd has full keyboard navigation support, focus trapping, and a11y compliance via aria attributes.

Highly Customizable

Shepherd's styles are kept minimal, allowing you to easily customize the look and feel, but still give you enough to drop in and be ready to go quickly.

Framework Ready

Shepherd is ready to drop into your application using React, Ember, Angular, Vue.js, ES Modules, or plain Javascript!

01. How to Include

02. example, brands that use shepherd.

React Tutorial

React hooks, react exercises, styling react using css.

There are many ways to style React with CSS, this tutorial will take a closer look at inline styling , and CSS stylesheet .

Inline Styling

To style an element with the inline style attribute, the value must be a JavaScript object:

Insert an object with the styling information:

Run Example »

Note: In JSX, JavaScript expressions are written inside curly braces, and since JavaScript objects also use curly braces, the styling in the example above is written inside two sets of curly braces {{}} .

camelCased Property Names

Since the inline CSS is written in a JavaScript object, properties with two names, like background-color , must be written with camel case syntax:

Use backgroundColor instead of background-color :

JavaScript Object

You can also create an object with styling information, and refer to it in the style attribute:

Create a style object named mystyle :

CSS Stylesheet

You can write your CSS styling in a separate file, just save the file with the .css file extension, and import it in your application.

Create a new file called "App.css" and insert some CSS code in it:

Note: You can call the file whatever you like, just remember the correct file extension.

Import the stylesheet in your application:

CSS Modules

Another way of adding styles to your application is to use CSS Modules.

CSS Modules are convenient for components that are placed in separate files.

The CSS inside a module is available only for the component that imported it, and you do not have to worry about name conflicts.

Create the CSS module with the .module.css extension, example: mystyle.module.css .

mystyle.module.css:

Create a new file called "mystyle.module.css" and insert some CSS code in it:

Import the stylesheet in your component:

Import the component in your application:

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Intuitive and customisable tours for user onboarding

TourGuide is a Javascript library written for creating user tours and on-boarding steps for your apps.

TourGuide JS has a range of promise driven methods and callbacks to provide an enjoyable developer experience.

Framework agnostic

Written entirely in vanilla JS with TypeScript and usable in virtually any framework. Choose from CDN or NPM installation.

Typescript support

Type definitions help automatically detect available options in your IDE as well as ensure a type safe package for your projects.

1 Dependency

Tour positioning is supported by Floating-ui. It's required modules are pre-bundled into the TourGuide JS library.

Customizable

Define an array of options to create the perfect onboarding experience for your visitors, you can even use custom HTML in your tour content.

Open source

TourGuide JS is in early stages of development and contribution is welcome. Open license for both commercial and personal use.

CDN installation is available for simpler integration or testing purposes

For projects with build processes, NPM is recommended

Get started

Installation.

Creating a tour only takes a few steps, once initialized you can interact with the TourGuideClient object.

Include in your project

Declare steps (data attribute method)

Initialization

Customization

With a variety of options you can tweak the tour to suit your needs.

Read the documentation to understand how to use events, declare steps and customize the tour behaviours futher.

Similarly to Next.js, we define a new page by creating a new +Page.jsx file.

By default, Vike does Filesystem Routing.

We can also define a page's route with a Route String (for parameterized routes such as /movies/@id ) or a Route Function (for full programmatic flexibility).

Render Control

Unlike Next.js, we control how our pages are rendered.

This control enables us to easily and naturally integrate any tool we want (Redux, GraphQL, Service Worker, Preact, ...).

Note how we defined the files onRenderClient.jsx and onRenderHtml.jsx in a directory called /renderer/ : that way, we tell Vike to apply the onRenderHtml() and onRenderClient() hooks to all our pages.

This means we can now create a new page just by defining a new +Page.jsx file (the +route.js file is optional).

Plus files in /renderer/ can be overridden. For example, we can override the onRenderHtml() and onRenderClient() hooks for rendering some of our pages with a completely different UI framework such as Vue.

Data Fetching

Let's now have a look at how to fetch data.

That's it for the tour and we have actually already seen most of Vike's interface; not only is Vike flexible but it's also simple to use!

How to Use React Developer Tools – Explained With Examples

Matéush

Traditional browser developer tools are designed to inspect and debug web pages by interacting with your HTML, CSS, and JavaScript code. However, you can't use them to inspect and debug React applications efficiently due to the nature of React.

This is where the React Developer Tools, AKA React DevTools comes into play. It allows you to inspect and debug your React applications by providing access to the components, states, hooks, props, what renders what, and more.

This article will show you how to use React DevTools by focusing on components, props, and state inspection. We'll also examine how to use it to enhance application performance.

For demonstration, we'll use the 2048 game code. You can grab it in this GitHub repository .

How to Install React Developer Tools

Installing the React developer tools extension for your browser is the most common way to use it.

If you use Chrome, visit the Chrome Webstore and search for "React", then select "React Developer Tools" and click the " Add to Chrome " button to install it.

Screenshot-2024-05-06-at-11.14.42

React DevTools is also available as a standalone electron app, an NPM package, and an add-on for both Edge and Firefox browsers. If you use the Safari browser, consider using the NPM package.

If you use the extension on Chrome but want to migrate your data to either Edge and Firefox, it will be automatically installed for you!

How to Navigate the React Developer Tools Interface

After installing the DevTools as an extension, open your browser console and you should see two additional tabs – Components and Profiler.

Group-25

The Components tab displays a tree view of the components in your application. It also gives you access to the hooks and props in each component.

Screenshot-2024-05-06-at-11.22.31

The Profiler tab allows you to analyze the runtime performance of your applications and identify costly re-renders or performance bottlenecks. From there, you can import and export recorded performance sections and see how long a component renders or why it re-renders.

Screenshot-2024-05-06-at-11.23.32

If you click the gear icon on the right side in any of the tabs, you should see a pop-up with 4 tabs – General, Debugging, Components, and Profiler.

Screenshot-2024-05-06-at-11.24.24

In the 4 tabs, you can adjust settings related to theme, display, debugging options, component filters, and recording settings for the profiler.

How to Inspect React Components with DevTools

In the Components tab, you can select a component and inspect it, just like you'd do with HTML elements in a traditional browser's dev tools.

To do that, click the select icon on the top-left corner, then select any part of the app to see the component that represents it:

As you make changes that involve adding something, new components will be added to the tree.

On the right-hand side in the Components tab are the props , hooks , renderer , and the source for any component you select in the tree.

Group-26

How to Explore Component State and Props

Remember that when you select a component in the tree, the state and props in that component are available on the right-hand side.

In the screenshot below, I have selected a Tile component for you to see the props:

Group-27

You can see that the Tile component has id , position , and value properties. From here, you can add a new prop and edit the existing props.

For example, I just changed a value prop from 2 to 4 and it reflected in the UI in real-time:

You can also make changes to a piece of state. For instance, the scorecard you can see in the UI is a piece of state in the GameProvider context. It updates your score as you play the game.

You can select the GameProvider context, look for the score state, and change it to something else:

How to Debug React Applications with React DevTools

The traditional browser developer tools is good for debugging your HTML, CSS, and JavaScript code, but it has limitations concerning debugging React applications.

This is the primary reason React DevTools was created in the first place, as it has the essential built-in features that can show you everything you need to debug your React apps.

One of the errors the browser can help you debug is a reference error. For instance, if there's an error in any of your components, the browser can show you the error message and the line affected.

For example, I've forced an error by changing cells to cell on line 62 in the board.tsx file of the app. This is what the error message looks like in the browser:

Screenshot-2024-05-06-at-12.08.50

You can then go to the line of code where the error occurred and make the necessary adjustments so the app can run again.

React DevTools also shows you a reference error and the component in which it occurs.

Screenshot-2024-05-06-at-12.11.19

How React DevTools Takes Debugging to the Next Level

In the Components tab, above the items on the right-hand side, are iconized buttons you can use to:

  • Force the selected component to an errored state
  • Inspect the matching DOM element
  • Suspend the selected component
  • Log the component data to the console
  • View the source code for the elements in the selected component

Group-28

For example, if the tiles in the game are not showing as they should, it's probably a styling issue.

Screenshot-2024-05-06-at-12.16.43

This particular error will not stop your app from running, so the best way to debug it is to use React DevTools instead of looking through your code, especially if it's large.

You can select the Tile component and log its data to the console. When you do this, the props , hooks , and nodes of that component will be logged for you.

Group-29

To see the component's data, you have to switch to the console tab and inspect the nodes to see what might have gone wrong.

Screenshot-2024-05-06-at-12.21.11

In the image above,it shows that there is a div element with an undefined className . This tells you that you've misspelt a className value, so you need to go back to your code and correct it.

If the error you're getting has to do with props or hooks , then you need to open up any of them to see what went wrong.

You can also look through the source code of any component causing an issue. For instance, if the scoreboard is not showing as it has to, select the component and click the "View source code for this element" icon.

Group-30

After the source code is displayed, you can step through the end of each line. Any line end that is red when you do that is the one causing the error.

You can then go back to your editor and make the necessary changes on that line.

Performance Analysis with React DevTools

Doing performance analysis with React can help you understand the efficiency of your application and identify any performance bottlenecks. This is what the Profiler tab lets you do.

To do this, switch to the Profiler tab and click the "Start profiling" icon to start recording.

Group-31

Perform the actions in your app you want to analyze. This could be page loads, user interactions like button clicks, swiping, or dynamic content loading. When you're done, click "Stop" to end the recording.

The Profiler will then display a flame graph and a list of commits. Each commit represents a render phase of your React application. Components that take longer to render will have wider bars.

You can then select a specific commit to view detailed information about the render performance of components during that commit:

Screenshot-2024-05-06-at-12.28.57-1

You can also download the profiling session, or import a profiling session. This means you can share the session with your teammates.

Common Issue and Solution: How to Fix React DevTools Not Showing

If DevTools fails to show up, it could be because it doesn't have access to the React sites you're viewing in the browser.

To fix this, type chrome://extensions/ into the address bar and hit enter, then search for the extension and make sure it's toggled on.

Group-32

If that doesn't fix the issue, click the "Details" button and make sure you grant an "On all sites" access under the "Site access" option

Group-33

From inspecting the component hierarchy and modifying state and props to profiling performance and understanding complex re-renders, React Developer Tools offers a comprehensive set of features that can improve the quality of your React applications.

Whether you're a beginner aiming to have a better understanding of the inner workings of React, or an experienced developer looking to optimize your applications, investing the time to master React Developer Tools will be profitable in your development processes.

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react tour css

Headless UI v2.0 for React

react tour css

Nothing beats actually building something real with your own tools when it comes to finding ways to make things better.

As we’ve been working on Catalyst these last several months, we’ve been making dozens of improvements to Headless UI that let you write even less code, and make the developer experience even better.

We just released Headless UI v2.0 for React, which is the culmination of all this work.

Here’s all the best new stuff:

  • Built-in anchor positioning
  • New checkbox component
  • HTML form components
  • Improved hover, focus and active state detection
  • Combobox list virtualization
  • New website and improved docs

Add it to your project by installing the latest version of @headlessui/react from npm:

If you’re upgrading from v1.x, check out the upgrade guide to learn more about what’s changed.

​ Built-in anchor positioning

We’ve integrated Floating UI directly into Headless UI, so you never have to worry about dropdowns going out of view or being obscured by other elements on the screen.

Use the new anchor prop on the Menu , Popover , Combobox , and Listbox components to specify the anchor positioning, then fine-tune the placement with CSS variables like --anchor-gap and --anchor-padding :

Scroll up and down to see the dropdown position change

What makes this API really nice is that you can tweak the styles at different breakpoints by changing the CSS variables using utility classes like sm:[--anchor-gap:4px] .

Check out the anchor positioning documentation for each component for all of the details.

​ New checkbox component

We’ve added a new headless Checkbox component to complement our existing RadioGroup component, making it easy to build totally custom checkbox controls:

This will give you early access to any awesome new features we're developing.

Checkboxes can be controlled or uncontrolled, and can automatically sync their state with a hidden input to play nicely with HTML forms.

Take a look at the Checkbox documentation to learn more.

​ HTML form components

We’ve added a whole new set of components that just wrap native form controls, but do all of the tedious work of wiring up IDs and aria-* attributes for you automatically.

Here’s what it looked like to build a simple <input> field with a properly associated <label> and description before:

And here’s what it looks like with these new components in Headless UI v2.0:

The new Field and Fieldset components also cascade disabled states like the native <fieldset> element, so you can easily disable an entire group of controls at once:

Select a country to see the region field become enabled

We currently only ship to North America.

We expose the disabled state using a data-disabled attribute in the rendered HTML. This lets us expose it even on elements that don’t support the native disabled attribute like the associated <label> element, making it really easy to fine-tune the disabled styles for each element.

All in all we’ve added 8 new components here — Fieldset , Legend , Field , Label , Description , Input , Select , and Textarea .

For more details, start with the Fieldset documentation and work your way through the rest.

​ Improved hover, focus and active state detection

Using hooks from the awesome React Aria library under the hood, Headless UI now adds smarter data-* state attributes to your controls that behave more consistently across different devices than the native CSS pseudo-classes:

  • data-active — like :active , but is removed when dragging off of the element.
  • data-hover — like :hover , but is ignored on touch devices to avoid sticky hover states.
  • data-focus — like :focus-visible , without false positives from imperative focusing.

Click, hover, focus, and drag the button to see the data attributes applied

To learn more about why applying these styles using JavaScript is important, I highly recommend reading through Devon Govett’s excellent blog series on this topic:

  • Building a Button Part 1: Press Events
  • Building a Button Part 2: Hover Interactions
  • Building a Button Part 3: Keyboard Focus Behavior

The web never ceases to surprise me with the amount of effort it takes to actually make nice things.

​ Combobox list virtualization

We’ve integrated TanStack Virtual into Headless UI to support list virtualization when you need to put a hundred thousand items in your combobox because, hey, that’s what the boss told you to do.

Use the new virtual prop to pass in all of your items, and use the ComboboxOptions render prop to provide the template for an individual option:

Open the combobox and scroll through the 1,000 options

Check out the new virtual scrolling documentation to learn more.

​ New website and improved docs

To go along with this major release, we’ve also significantly revamped the documentation and given the website a fresh coat of paint:

New Headless UI v2.0 website

Head over to the new headlessui.com to check it out!

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The price of loyalty: pga tour pros from jordan spieth to adam scott to chesson hadley react to the pga tour's equity ownership plan, share this article.

react tour css

McKINNEY, Texas – On April 24, PGA Tour pros competing in the pro-am at the Zurich Classic of New Orleans couldn’t stop checking their phones. The reason? To tap refresh on their email and see if their notification of how much they had been allocated of $930 million in player equity shares that were divvied up to nearly 200 Tour members, or as one player put it, “Christmas in April,” had arrived.

Commissioner Jay Monahan originally detailed the Tour’s first-of-its-kind equity ownership program in a Feb. 7 memo to players. And it was why players experienced an uncontrollable urge to check their phones during play; it was so egregious that the Tour sent pros a memo reminding them of its phone usage policy. 

Everyone wanted to know how much their loyalty was worth. The Telegraph reported Tiger Woods was to receive $100 million in equity and Rory McIlroy $50 million from a tier in which 36 players reportedly split $750 million. When McIlroy was asked at the Zurich Classic how much would make players feel validated for their decision to stay with the PGA Tour, he said, “I think the one thing we’ve learned in golf over the last two years is there’s never enough.”

We talked to a wide array of pros at the CJ Byron Nelson last week to find out how the rollout went and how they feel about being shareholders in the Tour’s new for-profit entity.

Chesson Hadley: 'The basement pays pretty good'

react tour css

Chesson Hadley hits his tee shot on the first hole during the third round of the Farmers Insurance Open golf tournament at Torrey Pines Municipal Golf Course – South Course. Mandatory Credit: Ray Acevedo-USA TODAY Sports

One of those players who had his phone out and received a memo with good news was Chesson Hadley. Last June, he was the first-round leader at the RBC Canadian Open after Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan stunned the world by announcing the framework agreement with Saudi Arabia’s PIF. Hadley, 36, remarked at the time that he would like to be compensated for his loyalty and the one-time Tour winner, ranked No. 297 and with earnings north of $12 million, was crucified for it.

“I chose the wrong pronoun. I said ‘I’ and people thought I was trying to be like I’m some world hero, golf hero that deserves it. I’m very aware of my career compared to the big fish who have stayed, I’m very aware of that,” he said last week ahead of the CJ Cup Byron Nelson.

“The basement pays pretty good. I have a good view from the basement.”

Hadley was pleased to receive his shares, something he said all players who finished in the top 125 in the FedEx Cup point standings received and noted that he was “blessed to be in the right place at the right time.”

“Some people deserve more, some people didn’t get any that probably should have but it’s not a perfect system,” he added. “It will be curious what the Tour looks like in 10 years. There’s never been a major sports association that hasn’t gone up in value, right? They keep growing. Teams like the Dallas Cowboys are worth $6 billion now and 10 years ago they were worth $3 billion. Hopefully, that’s the trajectory of the PGA Tour and everybody’s equity grows.” 

Asked if being a shareholder in the Tour changes his view about LIV players returning, he said, “It makes me want some of them back more. My piece goes up immediately if Jon Rahm comes back. The Tour is instantly more valuable if he comes back. I would think my equity goes up if PIF becomes an investor but I don’t know.”

Adam Scott: 'I don't think anything the PGA Tour is doing right now is about spending time looking in the mirror'

react tour css

Adam Scott putts on the fourth hole during the third round of the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am golf tournament at Pebble Beach Golf Links. Mandatory Credit: Michael Madrid-USA TODAY Sports

As a player-director on the Tour’s policy board, Scott, 43, has had an intimate view of how the sausage has been made in forming the for-profit entity and dishing out shares in the new venture.

“Honestly, I’ve really only heard of a couple of disappointments from some people who didn’t receive any. Of course, you’d be disappointed if you thought you were going to get some equity or a grant and you didn’t,” he said, noting that no one had directly approached him but that’s what he had heard through the grapevine. “I don’t think there are any holes in the system that was devised. I was asked should Jack Nicklaus get the most? I don’t think anything the PGA Tour is doing right now is about spending time looking in the mirror. It’s about building a Tour for the future.

“Grants to the legends category was correct and I just don’t know how far you can go in giving grants to players of 20 years ago, for example, when it is more about now and looking forward.”

Scott said he wasn’t sure how big a carrot the shares would be for players but called it a “gift,” a “perk,” and a “bonus.”

“It’s not exactly the same as the retirement plan but I think it is an additional perk of being a Tour member and having a stake in the business,” he said. “In the years going forward, hopefully the business goes well and this equity is a real bonus.”

Does he expect player equity to discourage more players from jumping to LIV Golf for lucrative guaranteed contracts?

“I don’t think it was designed as a retention tool if you want to call it that,” said Scott, fifth on the career earnings list with more than $64 million in earnings. “I think the guys who have stayed so far will have a longer-term view of things and will appreciate what the equity is and not just throw that away and leave.”

Jordan Spieth: 'I think it's very confusing'

2024 CJ Cup Byron Nelson

Jordan Spieth watches his shot from the second tee during the second round of the 2024 CJ Cup Byron Nelson. (Photo: Jim Cowsert-USA TODAY Sports)

Spieth, age 30 and seventh on the all-time career money list with $62 million, is a fellow player- director on the Tour policy board. He was asked about the player equity program during his pre-tournament press conference.

“I had a couple players call me and say, wow, I didn’t know — they were excited about what their grants — I don’t know what their grants were. They were excited it was more than they thought it was,” he said. “I had conversations all the way back to even maybe just into the new year with some guys who missed out on it that would’ve made it other years. So I heard both sides.

“As far as the roll-out, I believe that it was made very clear to everybody that if anyone was confused in what it meant, how was it coming, and the roll-out specifically, there was PGA Tour officials every week that could sit down and explain any time anybody wanted to. I thought that was a good idea. I think it’s very confusing. It still is confusing for us players on when it’s vested, what’s the best idea for taxes, you know, stuff that we don’t — we all have people for that. That’s not what any of us do and it’s fairly complicated.”

Matt Kuchar: 'It feels like you're a shareholder now'

2024 Zurich Classic

Matt Kuchar waits his turn on the 16th green during the first round of the Zurich Classic of New Orleans golf tournament. Mandatory Credit: Stephen Lew-USA TODAY Sports

Kuchar, 45, is 10 th  on the all-time money list with earnings nearing $60 million. He said he’s kept a low-key, head-down approach to the player equity plan.

“It feels like you’re a shareholder now. It’s kind of cool to be an investor in the original new entity, whatever that is,” Kuchar said, but added, “I don’t get real excited until the deal is done, until the money is in your account. I reserve some of the excitement until the deal is done. It’s a nice bonus.”

Kuchar has always been a good soldier for the Tour, willing to do a media interview, shake hands with sponsors, stop by a tent after the round. Asked if being a shareholder will make him more willing to do more, he said, “I feel like I have a good rapport with fans and they like that I smile and I look like I’m enjoying myself out there. I feel like that has gone as far for me financially as good golf has. That’s a way I’m an asset to the Tour. I’m fortunate that fans want to holler my name. Am I going to start a social media presence? I probably have such a tainted view of social media that it would be tough for me to actually be the one that does it, maybe if someone else does it on my behalf, maybe if that helps the PGA Tour and the stock, maybe. It’s a neat incentive to think about it as a shareholder if you can do something to help the Tour, you can also help yourself. It’s an incentive, for sure.”

Kuchar said his stake was what he expected. He didn’t have any problems with how it was handled but did express some disappointment with the signature event sponsor invites, particularly with the RBC Heritage, where he was a past champion. “I had high hopes on that one. That’s the one I thought I stood my best chance. I was bummed out. I thought I did the things you were supposed to do. A couple of days of being disappointed went away and I realized best to earn them,” he said.

[Kuchar learned on Sunday that he had received an exemption into the Wells Fargo Championship.]

Mackenzie Hughes: 'I wasn't waiting for a handout'

2024 Valspar Championship

Mackenzie Hughes of Canada plays a shot from a bunker on the 16th hole during the final round of the Valspar Championship at Copperhead Course at Innisbrook Resort and Golf Club on March 24, 2024 in Palm Harbor, Florida. (Photo by Julio Aguilar/Getty Images)

Hughes, 33, has been a refreshing voice speaking out on the greed in the game during these turbulent times. He’s earned more than $15 million during his career and the player equity program wasn’t something he was spending too much time thinking about given the number of years before a player can vest.

“I think they could have done a better job. Some people have to vest for eight years and some guys don’t. You have to play 15 events but there are other guys like Tiger who isn’t going to play 15 events; he’s going to vest in other ways. That option isn’t going to be available for others. To me there are so many questions and loopholes,” Hughes said. “It’s not money that I expected. I wasn’t waiting for a handout, let’s put it that way. If it turns out to be something nice, great, but I haven’t put much thought into it.” 

Austin Smotherman: 'I better check my spam'

2023 Butterfield Bermuda Championship

Austin Smotherman of the United States walks the eighth green during the first round of the Butterfield Bermuda Championship at Port Royal Golf Course on November 09, 2023 in Southampton, Bermuda. (Photo by Marianna Massey/Getty Images)

Smotherman, 29, is playing this season out of the Nos. 126-150 category and splitting time between the PGA Tour (five starts) and Korn Ferry Tour (three starts) this season. He’s earned nearly $2 million on Tour during his three seasons. More than a week after the majority of players had received word about their equity ownership, Smotherman still was in limbo.

“I haven’t seen anything yet,” he said. “I was a full-status guy at one point, do I get any? Even if it is half of a half of a percent.” 

He smiled. “I guess I’ve got to check my spam.”

But even Smotherman took solace in knowing that the program has an additional $600 million in equity grants that will be awarded in amounts of $100 million annually starting in 2025.

“Play better and there’s more equity to be had,” he said.

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Tourist Guide into your React Components

From v1.9.1 styled-components it isn't bundled into the package and is required styled-components@^4 and react@^16.3 due to the use of createRef , so:

Add the Tour Component in your Application, passing the steps with the elements to highlight during the Tour .

accentColor

Change --reactour-accent (defaults to accentColor on IE) css custom prop to apply color in Helper , number, dots, etc

Type: string

Default: #007aff

badgeContent

Customize Badge content using current and total steps values
Content to be rendered inside the Helper

Type: node | elem

Custom class name to add to the Helper

closeWithMask

Close the Tour by clicking the Mask

Default: true

disableDotsNavigation

Disable interactivity with Dots navigation in Helper

disableInteraction

Disable the ability to click or intercat in any way with the Highlighted element

disableKeyboardNavigation

Disable all keyboard navigation (next and prev step) when true, disable only selected keys when array

Type: bool | array(['esc', 'right', 'left'])

getCurrentStep

Function triggered each time current step change
Programmatically change current step after the first render, when the value changes

Type: number

highlightedMaskClassName

Custom class name to add to the element which is the overlay for the target element when disableInteraction

inViewThreshold

Tolerance in pixels to add when calculating if an element is outside viewport to scroll into view

Required: true

lastStepNextButton

Change Next button in last step into a custom button to close the Tour

maskClassName

Custom class name to add to the Mask
Extra Space between in pixels between Highlighted element and Mask

Default: 10

Renders as next button navigation
Overrides default nextStep internal function

onAfterOpen

Do something after Tour is opened

onBeforeClose

Do something before Tour is closed

onRequestClose

Function to close the Tour
Renders as prev button navigation
Overrides default prevStep internal function
Beautify Helper and Mask with border-radius (in px)

scrollDuration

Smooth scroll duration when positioning the target element (in ms)

scrollOffset

Offset when positioning the target element after scroll to it

Default: a calculation to the center of the viewport

showButtons

Show/Hide Helper Navigation buttons

showCloseButton

Show/Hide Helper Close button

showNavigation

Show/Hide Helper Navigation Dots

showNavigationNumber

Show/Hide number when hovers on each Navigation Dot
Show/Hide Helper Number Badge
Starting step when Tour is open the first time
Array of elements to highligt with special info and props

Type: shape

Steps shape

Steps example.

Value to listen if a forced update is needed

updateDelay

Delay time when forcing update. Useful when there are known animation/transitions

disableFocusLock

Disable FocusLock component.

Default: false

To guarantee a cross browser behaviour we use body-scroll-lock .

Import the library import { disableBodyScroll, enableBodyScroll } from 'body-scroll-lock'

Create the event handlers disableBody = target => disableBodyScroll(target) enableBody = target => enableBodyScroll(target)

Then assign them into the Tour props <Tour {...props} onAfterOpen={this.disableBody} onBeforeClose={this.enableBody} />

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Top 5 VS Code Extensions for React Developers

Peter Mbanugo

VS Code extensions let you add tools to your VS Code installation to support your development workflow. This article covers the top five VS Code extensions to speed up your React app development process.

VS Code extensions let you add debuggers and tools to your VS Code installation to support your development workflow. This extensibility model is one of the reasons many React developers choose VS Code. There are many extensions that help improve our development workflows as web developers. This article will cover the top five VS Code extensions to speed up your React app development process.

VS Code logo connecting to React logo with a puzzle piece between

ESLint is a pluggable linting utility for JavaScript and JSX. It statically analyzes your code to quickly find and fix problems, avoid bugs and make your code more consistent and readable.

The VS Code ESLint extension integrates ESLint into VS Code. Search for ESLint in the extensions tab in VS Code and install it, or use this link to install it .

It uses the ESLint library installed in the opened workspace folder. If the folder doesn’t provide one, the extension looks for a globally installed version. Refer to the ESLint documentation for a guide on setting up ESLint for your project.

2. Prettier

Prettier extension

Prettier is an opinionated code formatter that enforces a consistent style in your code. The Prettier extension makes it easy to configure the editor to format your code when you save it. Install the extension through VS Code extensions by searching for Prettier - Code formatter or using the web link .

If you’d like to toggle the formatter on and off, install vscode-status-bar-format-toggle .

3. npm Intellisense

npm Intellisense extension

npm Intellisense is a plugin that provides autocomplete for npm modules in import statements. All the imports for npm modules get automatically handled with this extension, thereby reducing your keystrokes.

You can install npm Intellisense by going to VS Code marketplace and searching for npm Intellisense , or by searching for it in the extensions window in VS Code.

4. Import Cost

Import Cost extension

Import Cost is used to display inline in the editor the size of the imported package. It uses webpack to detect the imported size and helps you become aware of the size of the modules you’re using.

You can install Import Cost using VS Code marketplace by searching for the Import Cost extension and clicking the install button.

Here’s an example that shows the difference in size when you import the uniqueId lodash function.

lodash

5. Simple React Snippets

Simple React Snippets

Simple React Snippet is a collection of React Snippets and commands. It enables you to tab out shortcodes into code snippets.

You can install it using this link or search for Simple React Snippets in the extensions window in VS Code.

Bonus: Tailwind CSS IntelliSense

Tailwind CSS IntelliSense extension

I know I promised you five, but this last snippet is one many React developers who love and use Tailwind CSS will appreciate.

Tailwind CSS IntelliSense is a tool that enhances the Tailwind development experience by providing VS Code users with advanced features such as autocomplete, syntax highlighting and linting. You can get it using this link or by searching for Tailwind CSS IntelliSense in the VS Code extensions marketplace.

VS Code has a large extension marketplace where you can find many extensions suitable for React developers. This article covered the top five VS Code extensions I’d recommend for speeding up your React app development process.

I hope this article helps make your development journey more enjoyable.

Peter Mbanugo

Peter Mbanugo

Peter is a software consultant, technical trainer and OSS contributor/maintainer with excellent interpersonal and motivational abilities to develop collaborative relationships among high-functioning teams. He focuses on cloud-native architectures, serverless, continuous deployment/delivery, and developer experience. You can follow him on Twitter .

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React 19 beta released, 7 common mistakes when using react hooks, react basics: getting started with react and graphql, all articles.

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Jimmy Dunne, Architect of PGA Tour-PIF Framework Agreement, Resigns From Tour Board

Michael rosenberg | may 13, 2024.

Jimmy Dunne has resigned from the PGA Tour Policy Board.

Jimmy Dunne, one of the architects of the PGA Tour’s framework agreement with Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund, resigned from the Tour’s policy board Monday, effective immediately. In a letter to the board that was obtained by Sports Illustrated, Dunne wrote that “no meaningful progress has been made towards a transaction with PIF,” and that ever since players seized control of the board and cut him out of negotiations, “my vote and my role is utterly superfluous.”

Dunne’s resignation comes almost a year after PGA Tour commissioner Jay Monahan stunned the golf world with the framework agreement . Initially rolled out as a “merger,” the framework agreement was actually the blueprint of a deal that would allow the Tour to determine the future of PIF-funded LIV Golf.

Al-Rumayyan planned to invest more than a billion dollars in the company that became PGA Tour Enterprises. He also agreed to drop litigation against the Tour “with prejudice,” meaning lawsuits could not be refiled. The agreement stipulated that Al-Rumayyan would become chair of PGA Tour Enterprises and that PIF would receive one seat on the Tour’s policy board.

Dunne, Monahan and policy board chairman Ed Herlihy negotiated that agreement in secrecy. Most Tour players were stunned by Monahan’s about-face and unhappy about finding out about it from the media. That anger has hovered over the process of completing a deal. Neither Dunne nor Herlihy is on the “transaction subcommittee” that is negotiating with PIF. Within the Tour, it is commonly accepted that Monahan has been flirting with unemployment since last June.

“It is crucial for the Board to avoid letting yesterday’s differences interfere with today’s decisions,” Dunne wrote, “especially when they influence future opportunities for the Tour. Unifying professional golf is paramount to restoring fan interest and repairing wounds left from a fractured game. I have tried my best to move all minds in that direction.”

Tellingly, Dunne said his role is superfluous now that “players now outnumber the Independent Directors on the board.”

In an attempt to placate furious players, Monahan added a board seat for Tiger Woods last summer . Last fall, Rory McIlroy, who has expressed frustration with the slow pace of negotiations, resigned from the board. He was replaced by Jordan Spieth.

SI , citing multiple sources, reported in December that board members Patrick Cantlay, Woods and Spieth had formed an alliance , with Cantlay as the leader. Cantlay told Golf.com it would be “impossible” for one player to have that much power. Spieth laughed off the SI report to the Associated Press, saying "It's been very collective since I've jumped on. It's not even a thing … (Cantlay,) like the rest of us, are all in agreement.”

But this spring, when Webb Simpson tried to resign and give his seat to McIlroy, that move was blocked . McIlroy said, "There was a subset of people on the board that were maybe uncomfortable with me coming back on for some reason.” Simpson kept his seat. Monahan then bypassed the board and added McIlroy to the transaction subcommittee.

The agreement was set to expire Dec. 31. It initially included a clause that LIV would not poach any Tour players, but the Tour struck that clause as a pre-emptive attempt to alleviate the U.S. Department of Justice’s antitrust concerns. Talks moved so slowly that in December, rather than finish the deal with the Tour, Al-Rumayyan signed Tour star Jon Rahm to play for LIV.

The player directors did not even meet with Al-Rumayyan until March—nine months after the framework agreement was announced. Before that meeting, Cantlay said, “I’m going into the first meeting with the idea of listening a lot more than talking,”

Last fall, the board turned to Raine Capital to guide negotiations. Raine helped the Tour strike a $3 billion deal with Strategic Sports Group in January . But more than four months later, it is not clear where the Tour’s negotiations with PIF are headed.

Monahan said in March that talks were “accelerating.” Woods said in April, “I don’t know if we’re closer, but we’re moving in the right direction.” McIlroy has pushed for a deal with PIF. Spieth has said, "I don't think it's needed” now that the Tour has a deal with SSG, though he has remained open to it.

Now Dunne is out. Of the seven members of the transaction subcommittee, only Monahan and McIlroy had official roles last June, and only Monahan participated in framework agreement negotiations.

A deal with PIF would be controversial because of Saudi Arabia’s human-rights record. But if the player directors are morally opposed to it, they have not said so—and have repeatedly stated they are willing to make a deal if they like the terms.

“When I arrived on the board in January 2023, everybody involved with the game was concerned about the fundamental threat of LIV Golf,” Dunne wrote in his resignation letter. “As directed by Commissioner Monahan, I engaged LIV’s majority owner, the Public Investment Fund, to see if we could end the lawsuits and reunify the game. Importantly, we were able to come to an agreement in which the lawsuits were dismissed with prejudice and a path was created for the Tour to remain in control of professional golf. I believe that history will look favorably on this outcome and the very real opportunities now afforded the Tour.”

Jimmy Dunne's letter of resignation from the PGA Tour Policy Board

Dear Fellow Directors,

After a great deal of thought about my role on the PGA Tour Policy Board, I have decided that it’s time to step down, accordingly I am resigning effective immediately.

When I arrived on the Board in January 2023, everybody involved with the game was concerned about the fundamental threat of LIV Golf. They were successfully luring away some of our top players, including several major champions. It was clear that the fracture would greatly damage our game and the Tour. On top of that, the Tour was engaged in burdensome litigation that was expensive, unwelcome, and uncertain. As directed by Commissioner Monahan, I engaged LIV’s majority owner, the Public Investment Fund, to see if we could end the lawsuits and reunify the game. Importantly, we were able to come to an agreement in which the lawsuits were dismissed with prejudice and a path was created for the Tour to remain in control of professional golf. Since there was no exclusivity clause, the players had a full range of options to seek outside investors. That resulted in a multi-billion-dollar commitment from the Strategic Sports Group. I believe that history will look favorably on this outcome and the very real opportunities now afforded the Tour.

As you are aware, I have not been asked to take part in negotiations with the PIF since June 2023. During my testimony at the Senate hearing, I said it was my intention to cast my vote alongside the Player Directors if a final agreement was reached with the PIF. Since the players now outnumber the Independent Directors on the Board, and no meaningful progress has been made towards a transaction with the PIF, I feel like my vote and my role is utterly superfluous.

It is crucial for the Board to avoid letting yesterday’s differences interfere with today’s decisions, especially when they influence future opportunities for the Tour. Unifying professional golf is paramount to restoring fan interest and repairing wounds left from a fractured game. I have tried my best to move all minds in that direction.

I want to express my sincere gratitude to all of the Directors that I have served with over the past year and half. Thank you all for your hard work and dedication during a challenging period. I want you to know that no one will be pulling harder for your success than me. Golf has given much more to me than I could ever give back, and for that, I will always be grateful.

Sincerely, Jimmy Dunne

Michael Rosenberg

MICHAEL ROSENBERG

Michael Rosenberg joined Sports Illustrated as a senior writer in 2012 after working at the Detroit Free Press for 13 years, eight of them as a columnist.

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Building a real time tour and travel website using react js.And it dynamic and responsive react js website for all devices.

luckystar20206/responsive-travel-website

Folders and files, repository files navigation, responsive-travel-website.

Website adaptable to all devices (Light & Dark) theme, Css(Grid & Flex) Pugjs with Sass and JQuery for beautiful animated interactions.

Key Features:

  • Travel website to the most beautiful beaches, using HTML, CSS & JAVASCRIPT.
  • Contains animations when scrolling.
  • Includes a dark and light mode.
  • Developed first with the Mobile First methodology, then for desktop.
  • Compatible with all mobile devices and with a beautiful and pleasant user interface.

https://sabryhosny.github.io/responsive-travel-website/

travel-website

  • JavaScript 11.7%

IMAGES

  1. Css In React

    react tour css

  2. How to Style React Components with CSS

    react tour css

  3. React-CSS best practices

    react tour css

  4. How To Use Tailwind CSS With React

    react tour css

  5. An Introduction to CSS Modules in React

    react tour css

  6. Complete Guide of React CSS modules.

    react tour css

VIDEO

  1. Thisis50.com International Tour Webisodes

  2. Imaqtpie

  3. LUKE FALLS heartache on the big screen wwa tour washington dc 8-11-14

  4. Girls Aloud Girls Allowed WWTNS Tour 2005

  5. Ludvig Åberg's path to stardom from Sweden to Augusta

  6. My Rishikesh Tour

COMMENTS

  1. reactour

    Tourist Guide into your React Components. Latest version: 1.19.3, last published: 4 days ago. ... Add the Tour Component in your Application, ... Change --reactour-accent (defaults to accentColor on IE) css custom prop to apply color in Helper, number, dots, etc. Type: string. Default: #007aff. badgeContent.

  2. Reactour

    Introduction. Before onboarding products became widespread, I found myself with the need to create a "tour" for new users of different projects, with a nice look and above all with the possibility to interact with existing elements of the page. Thus was born this project in 2017, trying to simplify the logic of intro.js with React ...

  3. @reactour/tour examples

    Tourist Guide into your React Components. Mask click. Example to show the customizable behavior of the Mask click event.Try clicking the Mask and the Tour will proceed to the next step.

  4. React Onboarding Libraries for Product Tours and Walkthroughs

    3- Intro.js React. Intro.js is the biggest JavaScript library for web onboarding content (21K stars and 2.6K forks), and its React wrapper, Intro.js React, is out there for the interested. With Intro.js, you can both create simple product tours and in-app hints/ Angular tooltips easily, which is a great advantage over other libraries on the list.

  5. Tour props

    Tourist Guide into your React Components. GitHub (opens in a new tab) Get started; ... A string containing one CSS Selector to match and highlight the element at the time of this step. ... The Tour uses FocusScope (opens in a new tab) in order to lock the focus iteration inside the Popover when Tour is active. This prop disables this behaviour. ...

  6. GitHub

    TypeScript 65.9%. MDX 16.8%. JavaScript 14.4%. CSS 2.9%. Tourist Guide into your React Components. Contribute to elrumordelaluz/reactour development by creating an account on GitHub.

  7. A Practical Guide To Product Tours In React Apps

    React Tour. React Tour has around 1,600 stars on GitHub and is being actively developed. The best use case for React Tour is a simple product tour in which little customization is required. A demo is available.. How It Works. With React Tour, you pass the className selector and content for each step to the component. The library will render the tour's user interface based on a button click ...

  8. Next.js Onboarding with Reactour (Tour.js)

    Next.js Onboarding with Reactour (Tour.js) Tour.js is a free JavaScript library for user onboarding. This library guides users through complex features of your application. By making an app easier to navigate, you can increase traffic and decrease the bounce rate upon first interaction. This post will go over a simple example of how to run Tour ...

  9. How to Style Your React Apps with CSS Like a Pro

    To use a linter in CSS, you will first need to install it. For example, to install CSSLint, you can use npm by running the following command: npm list -g csslint. Once the linter is installed, you can use it to lint your CSS code by running the linter and passing in the file or files you want to lint as arguments.

  10. react-tour examples

    Find React Tour Examples and Templates Use this online react-tour playground to view and fork react-tour example apps and templates on CodeSandbox. Click any example below to run it instantly or find templates that can be used as a pre-built solution!

  11. Overview

    It uses react-floater for positioning and styling. You can also use your own components. Open the demo Open GitHub repo. Setup. Copy npm i react-joyride. Getting Started. ... {// If you want to delay the tour initialization you can use the `run` prop return (< div > < Joyride steps = {steps} /> ...

  12. Shepherd

    Guide your users through a tour of your app. Accessibility Shepherd has full keyboard navigation support, focus trapping, and a11y compliance via aria attributes.

  13. tech2etc/React-Trippy-Tour-Website-Template

    Hi everyone, welcome to our new react js website tutorial. In this tutorial, We will create a responsive tour and travel website using react js. This is an empty react js template. You will get all the images and empty files here. Without wasting your time, let's see what react js actually is...

  14. React CSS

    App.css: Create a new file called "App.css" and insert some CSS code in it: body { background-color: #282c34; color: white; padding: 40px; font-family: Arial; text-align: center; } Note: You can call the file whatever you like, just remember the correct file extension. Import the stylesheet in your application:

  15. Web App Product Tours with Tourguide.js

    You can apply CSS to your Pen from any stylesheet on the web. Just put a URL to it here and we'll apply it, in the order you have them, before the CSS in the Pen itself. ... If you're using React / ReactDOM, make sure to turn on Babel for the JSX processing. Behavior. Auto Save. ... Simply add tour step descriptions directly to the HTML ...

  16. travel-website · GitHub Topics · GitHub

    Travelscapes is a responsive travel website built with HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP and MySQL, offering seamless travel planning, booking and exploration. Dive into the world of travel and adventure with us! mysql php web-development fullstack travel-website responsive-website. Updated on Apr 8. PHP.

  17. TourGuide JS

    Customization. Tailor the tour using a range of options, either set options on initialization or update them on command with the setOptions () method. All options are optional and defaults will be used in place of custom values. Use the TourStep type definition to automatically detect available options in your IDE. Set options on initialization.

  18. React Tour

    Similarly to Next.js, we define a new page by creating a new +Page.jsx file. By default, Vike does Filesystem Routing. We can also define a page's route with a Route String (for parameterized routes such as /movies/@id) or a Route Function (for full programmatic flexibility). // /pages/index/+route.js // Note how the two files share the same ...

  19. Travosy

    This React responsive template is an elementary tourism website template. Travosy is the best choice for travel agencies, tours, travel websites, tour operators, tourism, trips, destinations, trip booking, adventure, accommodation, and all other travel & tour websites. Features: Built with React v18.2.0; Built with Tailwind CSS v3.4.1

  20. How to Use React Developer Tools

    The traditional browser developer tools is good for debugging your HTML, CSS, and JavaScript code, but it has limitations concerning debugging React applications. This is the primary reason React DevTools was created in the first place, as it has the essential built-in features that can show you everything you need to debug your React apps.

  21. Headless UI v2.0 for React

    We just released Headless UI v2.0 for React which includes a ton of new stuff including built-in anchor positioning, a new headless checkbox component, HTML form components and more! ... the Menu, Popover, Combobox, and Listbox components to specify the anchor positioning, then fine-tune the placement with CSS variables like --anchor-gap and ...

  22. Jordan Spieth, Adam Scott, more react to PGA Tour's equity plan

    The price of loyalty: PGA Tour pros from Jordan Spieth to Adam Scott to Chesson Hadley react to the PGA Tour's equity ownership plan. Share this article 9.3k shares share tweet text email link Adam Schupak. follow May 7, 2024 11:26 am ET ... As a player-director on the Tour's policy board, Scott, 43, has had an intimate view of how the ...

  23. reactour

    Tour Props accentColor. Change --reactour-accent (defaults to accentColor on IE) css custom prop to apply color in Helper, number, dots, etc. Type: string Default: #007aff badgeContent. Customize Badge content using current and total steps values. Type: func // example

  24. Tiger Woods, Jordan Spieth React to Jimmy Dunne Leaving PGA Tour Policy

    Dunne, along with chairman Ed Herlihy was on the policy board of PGA Tour Inc.—not PGA Tour Enterprises—and that board was expanded to 14 members, six of whom are independent.

  25. dilshad-ahmed/tour-and-travel-website

    About. Build and Deploy Complete Tour and Travel Website using ReactJS and Tailwind CSS. you will learn how to make modern Multi Routes responsive web application from Building to Deploying it on the internet.

  26. Top 5 VS Code Extensions for React Developers

    Bonus: Tailwind CSS IntelliSense. I know I promised you five, but this last snippet is one many React developers who love and use Tailwind CSS will appreciate. Tailwind CSS IntelliSense is a tool that enhances the Tailwind development experience by providing VS Code users with advanced features such as autocomplete, syntax highlighting and linting.

  27. See Travis Kelce React to Taylor Swift Performing Songs Rumored to Be

    The Kansas City Chiefs star lent his support during Taylor Swift's final Eras Tour stop in Paris on Sunday. Travis Kelce appeared to be feeling the love during Taylor Swift's Eras Tour performance ...

  28. Jimmy Dunne, Architect of PGA Tour-PIF Framework Agreement, Resigns

    Jimmy Dunne, one of the architects of the PGA Tour's framework agreement with Saudi Arabia's Public Investment Fund, resigned from the Tour's policy board Monday, effective immediately.

  29. Building a real time tour and travel website using react js.And it

    Website adaptable to all devices (Light & Dark) theme, Css(Grid & Flex) Pugjs with Sass and JQuery for beautiful animated interactions. Key Features: Travel website to the most beautiful beaches, using HTML, CSS & JAVASCRIPT.