Everything You Should Know About Star Trek's Moriarty

Moriarty on the holodeck

"Star Trek: The Next Generation" has its fair share of bad guys. While the Romulans and the Ferengi make a major mark, the series also boasts a number of singular villains who memorably cause problems for the crew of the Enterprise. Data's evil brother Lore may be the most famous, popping up in several episodes and giving Picard and his crew significant grief. But there is another individual antagonist who rarely gets the attention he deserves: the malicious Professor James Moriarty. This iconic evil-doer exists thanks to the holodeck technology the beloved series introduced to the "Star Trek" canon.

Early episodes of "Star Trek: The Next Generation" often struggle to craft compelling stories set in the ship's virtual reality. But Moriarty makes his presence felt in two of the best holodeck stories of the series, told four years apart. A dastardly villain who wants nothing more than to escape his simulated domain and live freely in the real world, Moriarty is willing to use deadly means to make this happen, putting the lives of everyone on the Enterprise in peril.

With the surprise announcement that he'll be returning in Season 3 of "Star Trek: Picard," the time is right to explore this one-of-a-kind "Star Trek" villain. From his origins to his aims, this is everything you should know about Professor James Moriarty.

Ripped from the pages of Sherlock Holmes

Moriarty debuts in the Season 2 "Star Trek: The Next Generation" episode "Elementary, Dear Data." As you might suspect, the series doesn't simply create a new character as an homage to the iconic "Sherlock Holmes" villain: Moriarty  is that character within the confines of the Enterprise's holodeck. The holodeck can create entire worlds, populated by artificially intelligent people. Just as Picard uses it to live out the adventures of his favorite detective novel series, "Dixon Hill," the android Commander Data becomes Sherlock Holmes within its virtual borders.

In this Season 2 installment, Data heads to the holodeck for some fun with Lt. Geordi La Forge, who plays the part of Mr. Watson, the super-sleuth's companion. Like the literary Moriarty, the "Star Trek" version of the character is a deviously cunning criminal adversary who matches wits with Data's Sherlock Holmes. He's so vividly charismatic, he quickly establishes himself as one of the best on-screen versions of the classic "Sherlock Holmes" character . Moriarty initially concocts a scheme to kidnap a member of the Enterprise crew and force Data to solve the case, but soon sets out on a very different quest for physical freedom. Because, as with all things "Star Trek," this Moriarty comes with a science fiction twist.

Moriarty only exists thanks to Dr. Pulaski

While all of the pre-designed people who inhabit the holodeck programs possess a form of artificial intelligence, they are not gifted with sentience and are not truly alive. They're more like highly advanced video game NPCs, who can flexibly react to new situations and behave independently. But Moriarty does achieve sentience, which sets him apart from every other holodeck character and makes him a far more formidable opponent.

Moriarty is granted sentience by accident and happenstance. In a way, he owes his entire existence to Dr. Katherine Pulaski, the doctor who briefly replaces Beverly Crusher in Season 2. The more cynical Pulaski is a skeptic of Data's android abilities, and doesn't believe for one moment that he's capable of the creative thinking required to solve a true Holmesian mystery. After a pair of ill-conceived attempts at building a program to challenge him, Geordi La Forge realizes that the holodeck needs to create an original Holmes-style story that Data has never read to truly test his sleuthing skills. This requires a villain capable of defeating his android intellect.

The Enterprise computer follows La Forge's instructions to create an adversary who can go toe-to-toe with Data. The result is a truly 24th century supervillain: A sentient hologram of Professor Moriarty. He promptly kidnaps Dr. Pulaski, without whom he wouldn't exist.

He's one of the most dangerous villains on Star Trek: The Next Generation

In his first appearance, the holographic Moriarty is initially overwhelmed by the gift of sentience. He has little more than 19th century knowledge, but seems to be aware of the nature of his existence on the holodeck, and uses the kidnapping of Dr. Pulaski that's been programmed into him to get answers. As Picard later notes, Moriarty may not be familiar with the 24th century, but he's just as vicious in their present as he was in Arthur Conan Doyle's.

A devastating combination of computer-enhanced genius, shrewd cunning, and 24th century holographic technology makes Moriarty into a significant threat. He quickly becomes one of the most dangerous adversaries the crew of the Enterprise ever faces. He can't overpower them physically, or defeat them with more threatening weapons, but he can absolutely out-think and out-maneuver them. In fact, Professor Moriarty comes as close as anyone ever does to beating Picard and his crew on "Star Trek: The Next Generation." In "Elementary, Dear Data," he only yields when the Enterprise captain appeals to his reason, and promises to help him leave the confines of the holodeck some day.

Moriarty traps Picard in an elaborate simulated reality

After Moriarty gives up his fight in "Elementary, Dear Data," his program is shut down and stored in the computer's memory, where he doesn't experience the passage of time ... or so we initially believe. Flash-forward to Season 6 of "Star Trek: The Next Generation," and Moriarty returns in the episode "Ship in a Bottle."

This episode begins with Data and Geordi La Forge indulging in yet another "Sherlock Holmes" holodeck adventure. When they notice a small computer glitch, they ask Lt. Reginald Barclay to take a look. While purging the system files, Barclay discovers Moriarty's program. Moriarty demands to speak with Captain Picard. According to the incensed Englishman, he's been waiting to emerge from the holodeck systems for nearly four years, and has been conscious the entire time. The computer has been his prison.

Picard tells him that even the Federation's most prominent scientists can't find a way to bring him into the real world. Professor Moriarty is enraged, and forces their hand. Creating an elaborate holodeck within the holodeck, Moriarty tricks Picard, Data, and Barclay into believing he's gained control of the Enterprise. By refusing to release them from a collision course with a star if they don't find a way to bring him out of the holodeck, Moriarty is able to outsmart our heroes and gain control of the real Enterprise.

Moriarty is defeated by Data

Created by an unwitting holodeck command, Professor Moriarty begins as a rival to Commander Data. Appropriately, Data shows a gift for gumshoeing, and is every bit as clever and insightful as Sherlock Holmes himself. But after Moriarty ends his first battle with the Enterprise in "Elementary, Dear Data," "Ship in a Bottle" sees him match wits with Data more directly.

Luring Picard, Data, and Barclay into his home turf on the holodeck, Moriarty deceives them with a complex program. While they believe they've exited the holodeck, they've actually stepped into a virtual recreation of the Enterprise that Moriarty created and controls. The villain begins to manipulate their reality according to his own whims. Unsurprisingly, it's Data who connects the dots and realizes what's going on. To stop him, Data and Picard create a third program: A holodeck within the holodeck within the holodeck. This fools Moriarty into believing he's found freedom outside the digital realm. 

"Ship in a Bottle" is an "Inception"-style story that delivers a series of mind-bending twists. It's all the more impressive for being the product of an era in which virtual reality stories were still new and untested.

A cosmos in the computer

When Professor Moriarty is put into the computer's memory after the events of "Elementary, Dear Data," it's intended to be a temporary solution. But when he returns in "Ship in a Bottle," he's looking for a permanent cure to his holodeck confinement. After deceiving him with a series of simulations within simulations, Data and Picard find an ingenious way of stopping Moriarty for good, while still giving him what he wants. 

Moriarty's holographic program is inserted into an isolated holodeck module. Barclay explains that this module is like a holodeck without physicality, and will run continuously within the confines of its own circuitry, providing Moriarty with his own simulated version of the real world. It has enough memory to last a lifetime.

Though he isn't able to leave the holodeck, Moriarty essentially gets his wish. He has the ability to explore the cosmos, albeit a simulated one. But, as Picard notes, reality is in the eye of the beholder. For all the crew of the Enterprise knows, their reality could be the fabricated product of a module sitting on someone's table. But while that may give Picard and his crew solace, it's unlikely that the vengeful Moriarty would be as philosophical about it if he were to discover the truth.

Moriarty is the first sentient hologram on Star Trek

When "Elementary, Dear Data" first premiered in 1988, the idea of a holographic person was a relatively new concept in mainstream science fiction. Though "Star Trek" had featured sentient computers before, including Commander Data himself, a self-aware hologram with a body and soul was pretty fresh, being only briefly hinted at in Season 1's "11001001."   Moriarty is the first hologram in "Star Trek" to be confirmed as a sentient being who is aware of the nature of his existence and is an equal of characters in the physical world.

Since that time, holographic people have become a "Star Trek" mainstay . In "Star Trek: Picard," we see Captain Rios using a contingent of holographic duplicates as the crew of his ship, La Sirena. The starship Protostar on "Star Trek: Prodigy" includes a holographic Captain Janeway. Though it's not made clear if these holograms are truly sentient, "Star Trek: Voyager" Season 7's "Flesh and Blood" introduces an entire race of self-aware holograms, while Season 4's "Revulsion" makes it clear that self-aware holograms aren't limited to the Federation. Sentient holographic lounge singer Vic Fontaine even becomes a recurring character on "Star Trek: Deep Space Nine."

Moriarty creates a sentient holographic lover

Moriarty's plan in "Ship in a Bottle" revolves around his desire to escape the holodeck and find a new life in the real world. He also wants to bring his one true love, the aristocratic and adventurous Countess Regina Barthalomew, along for the ride. Whether this desire is genuine or part of his larger ruse isn't clear, but he does seem to have real affection for her. While Picard and Data wrestle with the philosophical and moral consequences of deliberately creating a new sentient hologram, Moriarty simply takes matters into his own hands and brings her to life by instructing the computer to do so.

Once she is endowed with consciousness, the Countess stands by Moriarty's plan to hold the Enterprise hostage, fully believing in her lover's cause and righteousness. Eventually, when Moriarty is led to believe he's been freed (though he is, in fact, inside a holodeck module), the Countess joins him on a trip to a distant world, where they presumably live out their holographic lives. 

A legal dispute almost halted Moriarty's return

"Star Trek" fans aren't the only ones who love this holographic version of Arthur Conan Doyle's greatest villain — he's also popular with the franchise's writers and producers. So when plans to bring Moriarty back for another episode after his debut were stymied, the crew wasn't thrilled. According to "The Star Trek: The Next Generation Companion," this was the result of a squabble between the Arthur Conan Doyle estate and Paramount. But after producer Jeri Taylor took another look at the dispute, the matter was quickly settled, allowing Moriarty to return in "Ship in a Bottle."

The creative team was so entranced with Moriarty, they dreamed up a third appearance for him. René Echevarria — writer of "Ship in a Bottle" — and producers Ronald D. Moore and Brannon Braga initially planned to bring the villain back in Season 7. As Echevarria details in the audio commentary of the Season 7 episode "Lower Decks," this follow-up installment would have seen Moriarty discover his virtual circumstances, and look for revenge. But they ultimately felt this story couldn't trump the satisfying ending "Ship in a Bottle" provides. Thus, the episode was abandoned. 

Moriarty inspired Voyager's holographic Doctor

According to  "A Vision of the Future,"  Moriarty inspired The Doctor of "Star Trek: Voyager" fame, who serves aboard the titular ship. Development notes from series co-creator Jeri Taylor reveal that the team actually considered bringing Moriarty himself into the series, but failed to find a believable way to make this happen. However, the notion of a holographic being filling the doctor slot remained enticing. Eventually, the unnamed Doctor was born. His self-aware nature is the basis of many episodes, which explore philosophical themes regarding sentience, immateriality, and his relationship to the conventional human experience.

The biggest change The Doctor sees over the course of "Star Trek: Voyager" is the addition of his mobile emitter, which allows him to move about, unfettered by holographic projectors. What would that mean for Moriarty? It's a tantalizing notion. Now that such technology exists in the "Star Trek" universe — and has been seen once again in "Star Trek: Picard," if only briefly — we can't help but wonder if Picard is ethically obligated to free Moriarty from his holographic fantasy.

He's played by a '90s sitcom star

"Elementary, Dear Data" is part of "Star Trek: The Next Generation" Season 2, a slate of episodes that sees the addition of Dr. Pulaski, the growth of Riker's beard, and what many believe to be a marked improvement in the show's quality. Moriarty's debut episode is a big highlight, what with its clever premise and sharp writing. One particularly major part of what makes the episode, and Moriarty himself, so memorable is Daniel Davis' performance as the Holmesian bad guy.

When this episode first hit the airwaves, Davis was probably best known for his stint on the daytime soap opera  "Texas." While short-lived by soap opera standards, "Texas" still garnered more than 600 episodes, over 180 of which include Davis' performance as Elliot Carrington. Audiences would get to know the actor much better in the 1990s, as he joined the main cast of popular sitcom "The Nanny," starring Fran Drescher. Here, Davis starred as Edward Niles, the wealthy Sheffield family's snooty English butler, who regularly thumbs his nose at the less refined Fran Fine, the series' titular nanny. Since "The Nanny" came to an end, Davis has made a wide range of on-screen appearances. But his turn as Moriarty remains one of his most recognizable roles.

Producers have wanted to bring Moriarty back for a long time

Given Moriarty's popularity, it stands to reason that the creators of newer "Star Trek" shows like "Star Trek: Discovery" and "Star Trek: Lower Decks" would be equally enamored of him. Many of these talented folks grew up on "Star Trek: The Next Generation," after all. So it should come as no surprise that his reemergence in Season 3 of "Star Trek: Picard" has apparently been something that the series' creators have been considering since the show's inception.

During a Q&A with fans on Instagram , co-creator Michael Chabon answered a number of questions regarding the series. One fan asked what single character he would like to include, if possible. Chabon's answer was simple: Professor James Moriarty. Though Chabon vacated the role of showrunner after Season 1 concluded, he remained a producer on "Star Trek: Picard" through its final two seasons. While it's unknown if it was his influence that secured a return for Holmes' arch-enemy, it's pretty clear that the people behind the series have long been hoping to bring Moriarty back.

Memory Alpha

James Moriarty

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Professor James Moriarty was a fictional character from the 19th century Sherlock Holmes novels by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle . He was an adversary to Sherlock Holmes, a man with knowledge equal to that of Holmes. Appearing in two Holmes stories, Moriarty was defeated by Sherlock Holmes at Reichenbach Falls , but only at the cost of Holmes' own life.

Katherine Pulaski read Sherlock Holmes novels and short stories in her youth and was always frightened by the despicable Moriarty. A love interest of Professor Moriarty was the Countess Regina Barthalomew . ( TNG : " Elementary, Dear Data ", " Ship In A Bottle ")

A hologram based on Moriarty was created on board the USS Enterprise -D in 2365 . The hologram grew far beyond the parameters of the Moriarty character when Geordi La Forge misspoke and requested that the computer create an adversary that could defeat Data , rather than Holmes as portrayed by Data. To do so, the computer had to program the Moriarty hologram with Data's considerable knowledge; as a side effect, the Moriarty hologram became self-aware .

In 2369 , when the holographic Moriarty appeared to gain the ability to exit the holodeck , Captain Picard warned him that the criminal behavior shown in the novels and short stories would not be acceptable in the 24th century . The holographic Moriarty assured him that he was not the same as the fictional character from the "scribblings of an Englishman dead for four centuries." ( TNG : " Ship In A Bottle ")

External links [ ]

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  • Professor Moriarty at Wikipedia
  • James Moriarty at the Sherlock Holmes wiki
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Professor Moriarty (Star Trek)

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Professor James Moriarty is a recurring antagonist in Star Trek: The Next Generation , serving as the main antagonist of the episodes "Elementary Dear Data" and "Ship in a Bottle".

He was portrayed by Daniel Davis .

Biography [ ]

While playing the parts of Holmes and Watson on the holodeck, Lieutenant Geordi LaForge became frustrated with the fact Lieutenant Commander Data instantly knew the solution to every case because of his complete knowledge of all Holmes stories. He instructed the computer to create an adversary capable of defeating Data. As a result, the computer created a hologram of Holmes' archenemy Professor Moriarty and imbued him with sentience. The Moriarty hologram began to deduce what he was and that he was on board a spaceship and dreamed of being free. He took Doctor Pulaski hostage and was able to gain control of the Enterprise from his holographic laboratory, threatening to disrupt the ship unless he was released. Picard and Data went to negotiate with him, with Moriarty having realised who Data really was rather than continuing to view him as Holmes. Picard was able to convince him that there was no way to free him but promised to try and find a way. Moriarty accepted the reassurance and released control of the ship, being stored in active memory.

However, Moriarty proceeded to spend four years in nothingness before accidentally being reactivated by Lieutenant Barclay. Picard and Data joined Barclay in meeting with Moriarty, who astonished them by walking off the holodeck, citing his willpower. He asked them to find a way to free his lover, Countess Regina Bartholomew, who he had informed of her true nature. However, it transpired that they were all still on the holodeck, in an illusion Moriarty had created. Having tricked Picard into giving him his command codes, Moriarty gained control of the real Enterprise and demanded they find a way to free him. Picard tricked him again, making Moriarty believe he and the Countess had been beamed off the holodeck when in fact they were still there. Unaware of the deception, Moriarty was convinced he had left the Enterprise in a shuttle and released control of the ship. Picard had the programme continue to run in active memory, so Moriarty would believe he was travelling the galaxy, feeding him constant new experiences for the rest of a human lifespan.

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Daniel Davis Talks About His “Different” Moriarty In ‘Star Trek: Picard’ Season 3

dr moriarty star trek next generation

| October 11, 2022 | By: TrekMovie.com Staff 61 comments so far

The final moment of the new NYCCC Star Trek: Picard teaser trailer had a surprise reveal: the return of Moriarty, the holographic Sherlock Holmes adversary who plagued the USS Enterprise-D on a couple of occasions. Actor Daniel Davis has come back to the role after almost three decades, and in a new video, he reveals more about Moriarty’s return including some minor spoilers .

The return of Moriarty is “threatening”

The hologram of James Moriarty played by Daniel Davis was created in the second season  Star Trek: The Next Generation episode “Elementary, Dear Data” by Geordi La Forge, who tasked the Enterprise’s computer to create an opponent that could defeat Data. The result was a hologram that became self-aware and tried to take over the ship. Davis played the character again in the sixth season’s “Ship in a Bottle,” which ended with the hologram being stored in a cube that ran a simulation so he would believe he had escaped the USS Enterprise.

dr moriarty star trek next generation

Daniel Davis as Moriarty in “Elementary, Dead Data”

Now the character is returning in season 3 of Picard; showrunner Terry Matalas says  he is one of its three villains (the other two being Amanda Plummer’s Vadic and Brent Spiner’s Lore). During the NYCC panel, show star Sir Patrick Stewart was asked to talk about working with Daniel Davis again, but Matalas jumped in to try to prevent any spoilers, saying, “He can’t.” Stewart did say this: “Moriarty being back again is both entertaining and threatening.”

dr moriarty star trek next generation

Moriarty brought a gun to the Picard NYCC trailer

Moriarty is different on Picard

In a new Cameo video from Tim Roy , Daniel Davis said he was happy to finally be able to talk about it but also revealed that he only appears in a single episode of Picard .

I have to say a hallelujah because my non-disclosure agreement was lifted yesterday at the New York Comic Con with the announcement that Moriarty would be returning. I’ve had to sit on this information since last December when I went to Los Angeles to film the episode. It was a fantastic experience as it always is… The work was was wonderful. It was just one day of shooting.

While his time in the season appears to be limited, Davis dropped a very interesting clue:

The one thing I think I can tell you is I think the fans will enjoy what happens more if they understand that it’s a bit of a callback to an earlier season, way before Moriarty even appeared actually—the first meeting between Riker and Data. You should remind yourselves of that.

It appears Davis is talking about the scene in the Next Generation series premiere “Encounter at Farpoint” when Riker meets Data for the first time in the holodeck, where Data was trying to master whistling. Davis also indicates that in Picard season 3, he has a scene with Jonathan Frakes’ Riker:

As Riker says in the script in the scene that we did, “This is not the Moriarity that we know from the Enterprise.” And in fact, that is true. And that’s all I can tell you. It’s a different different kind of Moriarty, but it’s still Moriarty. It’s very exciting.

dr moriarty star trek next generation

Riker meets Data in “Encounter at Farpoint”

Even though Davis only shot for a day, he was impressed by the scale of the production and attention to detail. He recalled for Moriarty on TNG they used a costume rented from the famed Western Costume Company , but for Picard the production sent someone to his home in New York to measure him for a custom costume.

They had tailor-made the outfit for me and it fit like a glove. It was absolutely astonishing, including an Inverness cape . It was an amazing costume. And then of course, you are treated so wonderfully by the company.

He also recalled being able to spend some quality time with Sir Patrick Stewart.

That day when I finished my fitting, I was on my way back to the parking lot and I ran into Jonathan Frakes and he was standing outside Patrick Stewart’s trailer, and Patrick Stewart poked his head out and he had finished his work for the day and he said [in perfect Stewart voice], “Oh, Daniel, how wonderful that you’re back” and I was invited into his trailer, and we sat and had a conversation for maybe 90 minutes… Patrick and I have a similar background in the theater and we are both acquainted with Ian McKellen. Of course, they are very close friends And I stood by for Ian in Amadeus on Broadway. So we had a lot to talk about the theater and about his plans and what he’s currently involved with—and I can’t tell you about any of those things either. But we had a wonderful time together.

dr moriarty star trek next generation

Daniel Davis as Moriarty in the Picard NYCC trailer

The final season of Picard premieres on Thursday, Feb. 16, 2023, exclusively on Paramount+  in the U.S., with new episodes of the 10-episode-long season available to stream weekly on Thursdays.  Picard  streams exclusively on Paramount+ in the U.S. and is distributed concurrently by Paramount Global Content Distribution on Amazon Prime Video in more than 200 countries and territories, and in Canada it airs on Bell Media’s CTV Sci-Fi Channel and streams on Crave.

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Only one episode huh?

And only one day of shooting, apparently. So he cannot even be a really big part of that episode.

Yeah, that’s disappointing. He was by far the best surprise of the trailer.

Of course, Daniel Davis has also played the captain of the USS Enterprise… CVN-65, in “The Hunt For Red October”.

That was Fred Dalton Thompson.

Thompson played the Admiral who was on board the Enterprise. Davis played the Captain of the Enterprise, Davenport.

So the Captain was the guy who didn’t care for Ryan wearing the uniform? The way the scene was set up was that Dalton was playing the Captain. I guess I do recall Ryan calling him “Admiral”.

Nothing ever dies in Star Trek anymore. Who would’ve ever thought a 30+ year old holodeck character from two episodes would’ve ever been back? Actually I think he would’ve been too perfect to bring back on Lower Decks and hey maybe they still can. ;)

Really looking forward to this!

We already know that Thadiun Okona ( The Outrageous Okona ) is returning via Prodigy , and this after Bruce Maddox ( The Measure of a Man ) returned via Picard and Ensign Sonya Gomez ( Q Who? and Samaritan Snare ) returned via Lower Decks .

It seems Secret Hideout really likes TNG Season 2. Maybe Carolyn Seymour is next?

Wow, I never really thought about that, but you’re right. There do seem to be a lot of call backs to season 2

I never thought about that either, but you’re right. And who knows, maybe Dr.Pulaski might make an appearance at some point. She is still the biggest new character from season 2 but was never seen or heard from again. And the actor is still around as well.

Moriart wasn’t dead the las time that we saw him.More or Less,Trapped In A Cube,for lack of a better term. But living his life, with the Contessa.

I wasn’t talking literally, just in general that characters never disappear and always extended in some part of the franchise in various media; many for decades on end. And yes even when a character dies…they still come back! ;D

Do I have to check my eyes or did he mention Data?!?!?! 😁😁😁 So I hope my biggest hope will come true and Data indeed will return too!!!

Damn, you’d figure that after dismantling Lore for the last time, they would have fed him into a shredder. Apparently not. So, some 25th century picker bought a surplus Federation storage locker at auction, and got a big payday with a disassembled android.

Lore never visited Talos IV, so they can’t legally execute him.

“good one!”

Yeah, that one’s a Keeper.

They can turn him off. And it would be a good idea to completely disassemble him after that and store him in different parts of the galaxy. He’s not “executed” as he could be put back together and turned on.

Would it be killing him if they destroyed everything but the head?

Is Data’s mother still alive? I mean the character, not the actress; Fionnula Flanagan is still alive.

But Flanagan looks almost the same as she did in Inheritance. . Amazing. One of those actors who just always looked older than they really were I guess (see also Wilford Brimley and Ellen Corby.)

All I can imagine now is season three opening with the 25th century version of Storage Wars!

I was beyond excited seeing him in the trailer, but with him being in just one episode I think I would have preferred to see the reveal in the episode itself.

I think in one of the interviews with Terry, this is what he was hinting at – he had to get permission to include a callback only a few would remember.

Little disappointed it this sounds this is just a cameo. I’d have been stoked it he’d been the season’s big bad somehow.

I’m getting the feeling there are going to be a ton of cameo’s this season.

And so begins the drip feeding of “trust me it will be special” from the cast

I had hoped for Nicky the Nose, but he’ll do.

I’m absolutely thrilled Moriarty will be back. It was honestly a huge surprise for me when I saw the trailer. But it seems odd to make his reveal at the end such a big thing when he’ll be there for what is most likely just one scene (Daniel did 1 day of filming which will hardly be more than the 1 scene he mentioned). I think I would’ve preferred to have gotten his reveal in the actual episode, making his small part feel more impactful.

I’m not so sure it will be just one scene. I mean a tailor made custom suit for one scene?!

I agree with you, but I also am reminded that Discovery spent a ton of time and money on the Klingon torchbearer suit for about 10 seconds of screentime. So wouldn’t put it past them to throw money at the production (though I hope the powers that be have learned some things about what not to do in a star Trek production).

Oh. Huh… Did not know that. Well I hope he is in more than one seen. Moriarty is the thing that got me the most excited about this season.

I’m making a prediction now: Moriarty is just one of several callbacks we’re going to get. This is going to be a “Commander Data, this is your life” kind of thing, with Lore, Moriarty, and other villains returning for minor roles.

What exactly do you mean with “Commander Data, this is your life”? ☺️

It’s a reference to an old TV show, This Is Your Life, in which people would be presented with folks from their past.

Interesting theory, But why would they even be doing that unless Data has some connection to the big bad of the season?

Someone in the Youtube comments on the teaser trailer had some interesting conjecture. Moriarty was created as the one person who could defeat Data. What if he is “summoned” by our TNG crew to defeat Lore? (again, not my theory – but thought it was interesting.)

Makes as much sense as anything else

That’s actually a really interesting theory.

I’ve been wondering this myself. I think Moriarty won’t be a villain this season, first because he’s just in one ep, and second because it makes sense they’d look thru their historical “AI” as it were to try to figure out how to escape whatever bad situation they’re in, and Moriarty is or will be one of them.

Well, that was informative. (Sarcasm)

Better news but it’s still awful he was even involved at all. There is no way to incorporate Moriarity into Trek in a workable way unless they wanted to make the Doyle characters real in the Trek world and time travel was involved. And that is pretty over the top even for Trek.

You realize that he is a character that has already appeared twice in TNG. What is unworkable about him?

They brought him in and used him in ways that didn’t work at all. It’s not unusual. There were a number of episodes that just didn’t work. How in this case? It makes no sense that a hologram would have the ability to take over the ship from the holodeck. At all. If that was so anyone could. Seems like an incredible security flaw. What’s stopping people from saying “create the Enterprise’ auxiliary control that actually works. Boom. You now have total control of the ship. Sorry but that’s insane.

I am assuming you don’t watch the classic series such as TNG? Several episodes show the TNG charecters were fans of classic literature. Picard likes Shakespeare while Geordi and Data liked Sherlock Holmes stories and reenacted them in the holodeck.

This version of Moriarty was created in the holodeck by accident when they tried to create an opponent that could defeat Data. He is a sentient hologram, and he already appeared in two episodes of TNG.

There is only one “classic” series. And it’s not TNG. Referencing classic literature is a long way away from a holodeck created character magically has the ability to take over the ship from the holodeck. Doesn’t matter he is sentient or not. And the character doesn’t need to be sentient to defeat Data. All that character needs is all information about Data and they would know about his “off” switch. It’s actually amazingly easy to defeat Data.

Thanks, this is literally the dumbest thing I’ve read this week.

I was under the impression that this person based on the volume of comments knows something about Trek? if they are joking, it did not translate to text

The comment demonstrates I do know something of Trek. But I guess the only thing I am ignoring is the ability for writers to insert things in that make no sense for their stories to work. Which is obviously what went on in the Moriarity episodes. To a much higher degree than usual.

But you didn’t explain why. Which seems even dumber in and of itself.

One episode. That’s a let down.

Hey, lets not forget that Hugh was only in ONE episode and he was in a good chunk of season 1. They should bring back Worfs holo battle partner to de-pacify him;)

Three – “I, Borg”, then “Descent” parts 1 & 2.

It’s not a great sign that the writers had to rely on a Holodeck trick for the plot.

I don’t know, I thought the Dixon Hill trick in First Contact was fun. Could be something along those lines.

This is an odd one, it seems like with only 1-day of shooting in one episode, he has a very minor roll to play and it would have been best to leave this as nice little surprise for when the episode airs. Appearing in the trailer is likely going to set expectations a little too high.

I was the same. But then again, I’m glad he told us now he’ll only be in 1 episode so expectations are already lowered.

I’d love it if they brought back Vic Fontaine, too! There was always a lot more to that character than met the eye.

I can’t believe no one has suggested this, but with all the hints about both, I think Moriarty downloads and takes over Lore’s body. Thoughts?

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Published Apr 3, 2023

WARP FIVE: Daniel Davis on the Return of the Dastardly James Moriarty

The legacy actor weighs in on his role as the adversarial hologram over three decades later.

SPOILER WARNING: Discussion for Star Trek: Picard Season 3, Episode 6 "The Bounty" to follow!

Illustrated banner featuring Daniel Davis as James Moriarty on Star Trek: Picard

StarTrek.com

Welcome to Warp Five, StarTrek.com's five question post-mortem with your favorite featured talent from the latest Star Trek episodes.

On the list of memorable foes Captain Jean-Luc Picard and the Enterprise -D crew took on, Professor James Moriarty instantly comes to mind for most fans. Despite only appearing in two episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation (“ Elementary, Dear Data ” and “ Ship in A Bottle ”), the fully fleshed out hologram feels as if he’s been present for far longer.

Professor James Moriarty stands in the corridor of Daystrom Station

StarTrek.com had the opportunity to talk to actor Daniel Davis about the iconic Sherlock Holmes foe, his relationships with the Star Trek family, returning to Moriarty over 30 years later in Star Trek: Picard .

On the Star Trek Family

For most Star Trek guest stars, they always recall being greeted with welcoming arms by the cast of any series, and the experience was no different for Daniel Davis.

Moriarty stands on the bridge of the Enterprise-D facing Data, Riker, Picard, and Worf

“It’s a big of a cliché to say that the cast is like a family but they are, and I am part of that family now and it’s wonderful,” shares Davis. “They’ve included me at Star Trek conventions. On the last night, they typically go out for a big dinner with each other, and they’ve invited me along for the last several times that I’ve seen them. I really do feel close to them, and it was wonderful to just walk back into that world because they have a lot of fun. They’re very serious about the work and they enjoy each other still to this day, and that’s rare and wonderful to be a part of.”

On Reprising His Holographic Yet Sentient Role

Moriarty first appeared in the second season episode “ Elementary, Dear Data ,” as part of the Enterprise -D’s holodeck programs based on the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s detective novels. However, Data has memorized all of the Sherlock Holmes novels and their cases, solves all the mysteries without going through the holo-simulation. At the suggestion of Dr. Pulaski and Geordi La Forge, on finding a program that’s challenging for an individual like Data, they have the ship’s computer develop a new Sherlock Holmes -inspired story. Unfortunately, for the ship’s crew, when Geordi set the parameters, he asked for a “Holmes-type mystery with an opponent capable of defeating Data ,” resulting in a sentient holographic Moriarty who is aware that Data and Geordi are not Holmes and Watson, respectively, possesses thoughts he cannot comprehend, and can control the ship’s computer. His demand is clear; Moriarty wants to exist outside of the holodeck.

Moriarty stands in front of his secret lab

Star Trek: Picard ’s “ The Bounty ” marks Davis’ third appearance as Professor James Moriarty. On his return as the Holmesian foe, Davis remarks, “Getting back into the character was a little strange because it wasn't really Moriarty from The Next Generation.”

“There was something slightly askew about it,” explains Davis. “I was never sent the entire script; I only had the pages that I was on because they're very protective about material getting out. And I couldn't make heads or tails of it. And even Jonathan [Frakes’] character says, ‘This is not the Moriarty we knew on Enterprise .’ And I thought, ‘That's right, and who am I?’”

On Star Trek: Picard ’s Iteration of Moriarty

Davis only had the opportunity to view the episode in its entirety before his press interviews where it suddenly all clicked into place for him.

“It wasn’t until I saw the episode myself that I realized that I was a figment of whatever powers Data had left to guide Worf and Riker into where Data was so they could find him,” Davis elaborates. “It was really the perfect choice of character to be recognizable to Riker. You put in the black bird, you put in the tune, and you put in Moriarty. Then somewhere in Riker's mind, he goes, ‘Ah, Data's around. Data's here somewhere.’ That's when I figured out, ‘Oh, that's what I was doing.’ I didn't know what I was doing until I saw it. I'm curious to see how the fans are going to react to it. I really am.”

Moriarty stands in the shadowy corridor of Daystrom Station

With Davis portraying a version of Moriarty from Data’s mind, how did he approach the role? He first revisited the Moriarty he knew from The Next Generation .

“It was interesting because again, it’s that thing that actors do,” states Davis. “They just work off the material and off the writing and off what they’re getting and receiving from other people in the scene. To hear LeVar’s character, Geordi, program Moriarty to be smarter than or as smart as Data, suddenly Moriarty appears with more understanding of his situation than any holodeck character prior to that. The fact that he realizes that he is a sentient being, but he can’t leave the holodeck.”

In his dark study, Moriarty expresses frustration with his left hand raised in front of him

“To get back into the character, I just put the clothes back on and realized, ‘Oh, I’m back to where I was 30 years ago,’” Davis continues, “The only thing that was different was that I had grey hair now. I kept my hat on, so they didn’t see it that much. It wasn't really a challenge to go back into the character; it was just a challenge to know which aspect of the character I was getting back into. But Moriarty wears a lot of hats in Sherlock Holmes , so it made sense. It made sense finally.”

On Davis’ Experience with Star Trek Fans

Fans first caught a glimpse of Davis’ Star Trek: Picard inclusion in footage revealed at last year’s New York Comic Con. To say that fans went wild would be an understatement as Moriarty has been a fan-favorite adversary, not just in The Next Generation , but in the Star Trek pantheon.

What has Davis’ experience been with the Star Trek fandom?

“I have loved going to the conventions so much because when I'm working in the theater, I know immediately how things are playing, how it's being received and how the audience is reacting,” details Davis. “And on television, you don't know that until somebody comes up to you and says something.”

Professor Moriarty and his companion sit in a shuttle holding hands as they look out on the horizon ahead of them

“There’s been so many [fan interactions], but I think one of the most touching ones was a young man in a convention in Australia,” adds Davis. “I was sitting at the table signing my picture and all that, and he was standing off to the corner and he was dressed in a beautiful suit and a tie, not the usual fan. I was there not only as Star Trek , but also The Nanny . And this is so touching, it almost moves me to tell the story. But he stood and he wouldn't approach, and finally, at the table, the line had diminished and there was nobody there. I kept seeing him and I just finally said, ‘Come on over.’ And he very shyly came over and I said, ‘Would you like a picture?’ He said, ‘I can't really afford a picture. I just wanted to tell you that I was bullied all through school, and every day I would come home, and I would watch The Nanny and I would forget about being bullied.’”

“It was so beautiful and very sweet,” Davis continues, “He said, ‘You just gave me so much laughter and joy. I love Moriarty, I love Niles, and I love everything you do.’ So of course, I gave him a picture. I said, ‘You're not going to have to buy it. Don't be silly.’ Those kinds of encounters- I had one couple show up in Las Vegas, and they had taken a photo of me and blown it up to- It was as big as a wall. And they said, ‘Could you please sign this?’ And I said, "Yeah, of course. Where will you put this?’ And they have a barn, and they hang all these pictures from the rafters in the barn. And they had me and they had Patrick [Stewart]. They had tons of people that they love from the show, and we're all now hanging in their barn.”

On Designing His Own Holosuite Program

Moriarty stands in the Enterprise's holodeck with a smirk on his face

Where would the legacy actor go if he could design his own holosuite program?

Davis ponders before stating, “In my simulation, I would want to create something where I was in Italy. I love being in Italy, and that I would be making a movie with Franco Zeffirelli where I’m dressed and looked like Marcello Mastroianni.”

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Christine Dinh (she/her) is the managing editor for StarTrek.com. She’s traded the Multiverse for helming this Federation Starship.

In addition to streaming on Paramount+ , Star Trek: Picard also streams on Prime Video outside of the U.S. and Canada, and in Canada can be seen on Bell Media's CTV Sci-Fi Channel and streams on Crave. Star Trek: Picard is distributed by Paramount Global Content Distribution.

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Professor James Moriarty (Daniel Davis) is back in Star Trek: Picard season 3, but how? Moriarty is among the huge surprises in the new Star Trek: Picard season 3 trailer, which focuses on the villains of the final season of the hit Paramount+ series that reunites Admiral Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart) with the full cast of Star Trek: The Next Generation . Star Trek: Picard season 3 also brings back Lore (Brent Spiner) and introduces a new Big Bad named Captain Vadic (Amanda Plummer). But it's Moriarty's return that perhaps raises the most questions.

Moriarty pops up at the end of Star Trek: Picard season 3's trailer, where he utters the line, "Greetings, old friends!" and pulls out a pistol. It is apparently the same Moriarty who was last seen in the Star Trek: The Next Generation season 6 episode, "Ship in a Bottle." Yet Moriarty was always a hologram, so is the 19th century criminal mastermind back in the flesh? There are a couple of ways this is possible, if so. Star Trek: Voyager introduced the mobile emitter that allowed the holographic Doctor (Robert Picardo) to leave Sickbay; perhaps Professor Moriarty has a 25th century version of the device that allows him to function outside of a holodeck program. Another possibility is that Moriarty is back in a synthetic body. After all, Star Trek: Picard season 1 introduced perfectly human-like androids in Soji and Dahj (Isa Briones), and Jean-Luc Picard himself died and was resurrected in a synthetic body. Perhaps the genius Moriarty accomplished the same feat, either by himself or maybe with the help of Lore.

Related: Picard Season 3 Will Show Captain Riker's Biggest Difference To Jean-Luc

TNG 's Professor James Moriarty Explained

Moriarty was introduced in the Star Trek: The Next Generation season 2 episode "Elementary Dear Data." He was the foil for Data (Brent Spiner), who enjoyed role playing as Sherlock Holmes, with Geordi La Forge (LeVar Burton) as Watson, on the holodeck. Moriarty was upgraded into a program who could challenge Data's intellect, and the virtual villain quickly became self-aware and attempted to take over the USS Enterprise-D. Along with his love interest, Countess Regina Bartholemew (Stephanie Beacham), Moriarty again tried to gain control of the Enterprise in the TNG season 6 episode, "Ship in a Bottle." Captain Picard's solution was to place Moriarty and Regina in an endlessly regenerating holodeck program which would allow them to explore the galaxy and live out their lives.

However, it was always a lingering question what happened to Moriarty and his program after the Enterprise-D was destroyed in Star Trek Generations . Whether Moriarty's program was salvaged or lost was never determined. Nonetheless, Moriarty is now back in Star Trek: Picard season 3, which will hopefully provide an explanation for how this is possible.

Everything Revealed About Moriarty's Star Trek: Picard Season 3 Return

Daniel Davis recently provided a few more scintillating details about his return as Professor Moriarty in a Cameo that was reported by TrekMovie.com . According to the actor, Moriarty only appears in one episode of Star Trek: Picard season 3, and his return is "a bit of a callback to an earlier season, way before Moriarty even appeared actually—the first meeting between Riker and Data." Davis must be referring to the Star Trek: The Next Generation pilot , "Encounter at Farpoint," when Commander Will Riker (Jonathan Frakes) first met Data and called the android, "Pinocchio."

Davis also added that Riker says in the script of his appearance in Star Trek: Picard season 3, "'This is not the Moriarity that we know from the Enterprise.' And in fact, that is true... It’s a different kind of Moriarty, but it’s still Moriarty." Daniel Davis' hints do point towards the possibility that Moriarty is back as a synthetic or that he underwent a profound change since his last TNG appearance, be it physically or mentally. The mystery of Professor James Moriarty is certainly one of the most compelling aspects of Star Trek: Picard season 3.

Next: What Happened To Data's Evil Brother Lore Between TNG & Picard Season 3

Star Trek: Picard Season 3 premieres February 16, 2023, on Paramount+.

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Star Trek: Picard’s Daniel Davis Shares His Thoughts On Moriarty's Return And Potential Future Appearances

The star had a lot to share.

Moriarty on Star Trek: Picard on Paramount+

Warning! The following contains SPOILERS for the Star Trek: Picard episode "Bounty." Read at your own risk!

Star Trek: Picard made a ton of references in the episode "Bounty," but few were as exciting as the reappearance of the classic villain from The Next Generation , Moriarty . Actor Daniel Davis reprised his role for a brief scene and was kind enough to speak to CinemaBlend about returning to the character after decades away. 

I spoke to Daniel Davis about his return as Moriarty and learned that even he didn't fully understand it until a couple of days before we spoke. Davis explained what all went down after he agreed to return and how he wasn't entirely sure what was happening with the character in Star Trek: Picard all throughout filming: 

All I saw were the pages that I was on, and I read the scene and thought, Well, this is not exactly the Moriarty from Next Gen.’ It’s a different take on it…So by the time I got to L.A. I still didn’t have a complete script, and I didn’t know what happened after my scene and what I was doing, really…It made sense to me after I saw it, but not so much sense to me when I was doing it. But somehow or another it worked out ok.

As mentioned, Daniel Davis finally got a chance to see the episode and learned that his Moriarty was actually a clue provided to Riker from Data , who was in the facility . Davis definitely had a greater appreciation for the scene and what it was trying to accomplish compared to when he filmed the Star Trek: Picard scene without any context. 

For those who don't remember, Moriarty was a hologram program based on the Sherlock Holmes character created to challenge Data. In “Elementary, Dear Data,” Moriarty became self-aware, and Picard promised to find a way for him to live outside of the holodeck. 

Moriarty returned in Star Trek: The Next Generation 's “Ship In A Bottle" upset that Picard lied about finding a way to remove him from the holodeck. That actually wasn't true, but the villain couldn't be convinced otherwise. The crew then had to trick Moriarty into believing he'd left the Enterprise , but in actuality, he was trapped in a simulation within a simulation, which was contained inside a memory module.

Daniel Davis admitted that, prior to receiving his scene, his mind was buzzing with possibilities about what his Star Trek: Picard arc might be about. The actor talked about the storyline he'd hoped to be a part of, which would've tied back to his story in The Next Generation : 

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I created my own little scenario in my head about what the episode might be about. My hope, or what I fantasized, was that there would be some sort of resolution between Picard and I about the fact that he does not break promises. And he promised he would find a way to get me off the holodeck, and he never did. So, I thought, ‘Ok, the whole Star Trek: Picard series is about revisiting his mistakes from the past and blah blah blah,’ But that was in my mind.

Daniel Davis didn't get the reunion with Patrick Stewart that he hoped for, and I'm sure there are a few who watched with their Paramount+ subscription who felt the same way. Unfortunately, Jean-Luc Picard was elsewhere working on a rescue plan to save Riker, Worf and Raffi, so there wasn't an opportunity for the two to meet. Of course, it wouldn't have really mattered if they did, because again, this wasn't the actual Moriarty. 

While Daniel Davis didn't get the chance to properly reprise his role, he's certainly open to the possibility if it presents itself in the future. Davis mused about the possibility of appearing in another upcoming Star Trek series or even another season of Picard if that's in the cards:

Even though it’s supposedly the final season of Star Trek: Picard and Patrick has said in one place that he’s done with Picard and another place he says, “Never say never,” there’s always a possibility. One of the producers said to me Moriarty is one of those characters who can show up anywhere. And so, there’s so many incarnations of Star Trek right now. I might pop up on Strange New Worlds! What could be more strange than that?

I would've pointed out that it'd be hard for a holodeck character to make an appearance in the TOS era of Star Trek , but Daniel Davis does have a point. Hell, Lower Decks and Strange New Worlds are having a crossover in the upcoming season, so is it really that hard to believe something like this could happen? 

More realistically, it seems far more likely we'd see Davis on one of the other shows or even a Picard spinoff. While there isn't anything definitive in the works at the moment, there are plenty of folks in the cast campaigning to see the story continue past this. There are definitely more stories to tell if it does, but we'll just have to wait and see. 

Catch new episodes of Star Trek: Picard Thursdays on Paramount+ . With the season officially past the halfway point, now is as good of a time as any to revisit the best episodes so far and speculate where the rest of this season is headed. 

Mick Joest is a Content Producer for CinemaBlend with his hand in an eclectic mix of television goodness. Star Trek is his main jam, but he also regularly reports on happenings in the world of Star Trek, WWE, Doctor Who, 90 Day Fiancé, Quantum Leap, and Big Brother. He graduated from the University of Southern Indiana with a degree in Journalism and a minor in Radio and Television. He's great at hosting panels and appearing on podcasts if given the chance as well.

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Star Trek: The Next Generation – Season 6, Episode 12

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‘Star Trek: Picard’: Daniel Davis on Moriarty’s Surprising Return

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  • Star Trek: Picard

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After three decades off the screen, Moriarty — and Daniel Davis, the actor who portrays him — is back on today’s Star Trek: Picard , once again taunting and hunting members of Starfleet. Only this time, Sherlock Holmes’s holographic arch-enemy is not the same Moriarty who appeared on two episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation .

Spoilers past this point , but in today’s episode, titled “The Bounty”, written by Christopher Monfette and directed by Dan Liu, after heading to a Starfleet black site called Daystrom Station to try and discover what this season’s villains the Changelings are planning, Riker ( Jonathan Frakes ) and company instead encounter Moriarty. Quickly, Riker realizes that a musical tone playing under Moriarty’s attack is not about the villain; but in fact a whistling tune he figured out way back when Riker first met Data ( Brent Spiner ) on Next Generation .

“The interesting thing for me was that I never got a complete script from them because they’re very tight about keeping everything under wraps,” Davis told Decider. “All I ever received were my scenes that I had in the show, just the pages… I read the scene and I thought, ‘This isn’t even Moriarty. This isn’t the guy that I created on the show.'”

Don’t worry, Davis wasn’t ultimately disappointed — he was elated to return to the show that helped make his name back in 1993, the same year he launched his other most iconic role, as butler Niles on sitcom The Nanny . And despite Moriarty’s brief, decidedly different return on today’s Picard , he still got a custom made suit and a 90 minute chat with Patrick Stewart out of the deal.

For much more from Davis on the character’s return, as well as whether there will be a Nanny reunion for the thirtieth anniversary, read on.

Decider: You’ve been in dozens or roles… What do you think it is about this two episode appearances from a couple of decades back as Moriarty that has stuck with viewers for so long?

Daniel Davis: I think that it was a brilliant choice to combine the Star Trek mythos with the Sherlock Holmes mythos because a lot of the fans for ones are the fans of the other. So it satisfied, it just satisfied the longing in Data and Geordi to create something on the Holodeck that they would enjoy doing, and so I think it translated to the fans. It astonishes me still to this day how popular those episodes are, but they were so well written. And as usual with Star Trek episodes, there is so much to unpack in every episode that you can watch again and again and again and just keep, you know, adding your own thoughts to it. They were just great episodes. “Ship in a Bottle” was my favorite because of just the dealing with the fact that: what does it actually mean to be a sentient human being.

J umping ahead to Picard here, how did they first approach you about reprising this role? And what was your reaction like?

Well, my agent called me and the first thing he said was, “We’ve heard from Star Trek ,” and I said “Yes.” And he said, “Don’t you want to know what it is?” And I said “I don’t care. Whatever it is, yes.” And, so, once we had agreed to do it, the interesting thing for me was that I never got a complete script from them because they’re very tight about keeping everything under wraps. All I ever received were my scenes that I had in the show, just the pages. So, I read through and, of course, the moment I had agreed to do it, I had written my own little fantasy of what the episode might be. And I think I had hopes, or at least I imagined, that it would be some sort of resolution between Picard and Moriarty. Because Picard doesn’t break promises, and he told the character that he would find a way of getting him off the Holodeck, which he never really did. And so I thought, ok, so this episode is going to be about Picard coming to terms with some of his past mistakes and blah, blah, blah. And then suddenly I would be like The Doctor on Voyager , or I’d have an arm band that would allow me to come off the Holodeck and be a real person.

But, of course, then I read the scene and I thought, “This isn’t even Moriarty. This isn’t the guy that I created on the show.” And so I put in a call and was able – I kept trying to speak to the executive producer who was always on set, so I could never really get any information about who I was in that moment. So, I didn’t really understand what I was doing. I ended up doing it the way it was written and hoping that it would work. And then, of course, they just sent me a screener of the episode like two days ago, and I thought, “Gee, if I had had that information, you know, before I shot it…” — Because Riker, as you probably remember, says in the scene when I’m introduced, “This is not the sentient being that we knew on the Enterprise.” And I agreed, when I read it I thought, “No, I’m not.” So who am I? And then when the other scene, the second scene, played when they come in the room where Data is and he says he wasn’t trying to harm us, he was trying to guide us. And then I thought oh, I was a figment of whatever Data’s brain, or however it’s functioning, just created me to guide them to him so that they would find him. So I served a function, but it wasn’t really Moriarity in that sense.

But at the same time, you’re putting the costume back on… So what was that like when you got back into that suit?

Well, first of all, I was of course delighted to be asked to return. I’m a huge fan of the show. I’m a huge fan of Star Trek from the very beginning, and to be a part of it and to be working with those people again was really exciting for me because they’re such– It’s such a cliche to say that a company is like a family, but at this point they really are like a family. They’ve been together for so long. And I went out, they treated me so beautifully and so well. They sent a tailor to my home in upstate New York to measure me for my costumes because the original costumes had been lost to time, and so they tailor-made a suit for me with an imprint “S” and a whole outfit.

The first day I was on set, I went for a costume fitting, and as I was coming out and crossing to the parking lot to get back to the hotel, I saw Jonathan Frakes standing speaking to someone, but I couldn’t tell who he was talking to. And he turned around at one point and he saw me and he said, “Well, look who’s here,” and he was speaking to Patrick who was standing in the doorway of his trailer. And it was like “Oh Daniel, it’s wonderful you’re back. I’m so happy to…” He invited me in for a chat and we sat down and talked for at least 90 minutes, and it was just wonderful. But getting back into the character, which is what you asked me – It was a little tricky because I didn’t really recognize him. I didn’t really recognize, in the writing, who this guy was. But I adjusted to it. And of course being with them, and acting opposite them and acting off of them, you just go right back. It’s like riding a bicycle.

You have a really lovely close-up introduction shot in the episode where you have this sort of curve of your mouth. You put a little snarl on it. What do you do there? How do you form an expression like that, from an acting perspective?

It’s always the mind body connection. Acting is just thinking and listening for me. And, the moment I saw Riker and I heard him speak my name and recognize my name, it was just this little, sort of, smile of recognition. It was sort of like, “yeah, you remember me, and I‘m going to make you remember me even better.” And it was just something going on in my head, I can’t really tell you. It’s a question of mechanics more than anything else.

Fair enough. I guess I just wanted to offer my appreciation of that moment .

I appreciate that you appreciated it. My sly little smile.

Looking back, you had that second Next Generation episode airing in 1993 — which, like we talked about, was a big deal. That’s also the same year when you kicked off your role in The Nanny . What was that year like for you? To have those two big moments in your career?

Well, it was an embarrassment of riches really, because I always keep my hair kind of long because I play so many, sort of, classical parts, especially in theater. So, I’ve always worn my hair long. And I went to audition for The Nanny at my final callback at CBS and I think by the time I got home, the agent called and said, “You’re going to be doing it, you got it.” And then I got a call about coming back to Star Trek , and so I was just glad I hadn’t cut my hair. So we kept the hair and shot that episode, and then right after I shot it just a few weeks later, I was on set with short hair to play Niles in The Nanny .

It was a very serendipitous year. It was the pilot of the episode and, quite honestly, I think I had done maybe twelve pilots that never went anywhere and I thought “If this one doesn’t go, I’m going back to New York and going back to the theater,” and then I didn’t know whether it would go or not. My agent called after they screened it in the test market and said this has tested higher than anything CBS has put out in a very long time. So we did it, and we did it for six years. And it was great fun. In fact, I just last night went to Renée Taylor, who played Fran’s mother on the show, gave herself her 90th birthday party last night in Manhattan and I went to that and some of the old gang was there and we had a wonderful time.

Fran Drescher had mentioned doing something for the 30th anniversary of The Nanny this year, have you heard anything about that?

There were a couple of the young kids, who are now grown ups, were at the party last night, and they brought it up and I said this is the first I’m hearing of it. So, I honestly – I don’t have a clue what’s happening. We haven’t heard.

This interview has been edited for clarity and length.

Star Trek: Picard streams Thursdays on Paramount+.

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Picard Season 3 Brings Back One Of The Next Generation's Silliest Villains

Star Trek: The Next Generation

This post contains  spoilers for episode 6, season 3 of "Star Trek: Picard."

On the sixth episode of the third season of "Star Trek: Picard" — called "The Bounty" — Worf (Michael Dorn), Raffi (Michelle Hurd), and Capt. Riker (Jonathan Frakes) break into a space-bound, top-secret Federation storage warehouse called Daystrom station. On board, the characters find a lot of shadowy corridors lined with lockers containing strange "Star Trek"-related artifacts. In one locker, Worf discovers a living tribble, only this one is equipped with fangs and a sucker mouth. In another, Raffi finds the remains of Capt. Kirk, presumably retrieved from under a pile of rocks on Veridian III. The references rest on the border of cute and insufferable, and the episode as a whole leans far too hard into nostalgic temptation. 

Case in point: Daystrom station is equipped with an artificially intelligent security system that recognizes Riker and Worf and immediately initiates a holographic security countermeasure. Ignoring for a moment that a mere storage warehouse is equipped with sophisticated holo-emitters, Riker, Worf, and Raffi find themselves facing off against none other than Moriarty (Daniel Davis), the nemesis of Sherlock Holmes as he appeared in Arthur Conan Doyle's 1893 short story, "The Final Problem." Raffi is baffled that a holographic villain from the 19th century is guarding a Federation black site in the 25th, especially when only armed with an old-fashioned pistol.

Moriarty's presence on "Picard" is a little perplexing, but it was perhaps no more perplexing than his two previous appearances on "Star Trek: The Next Generation" where Moriarty, as a hologram, achieved consciousness and attempted to take over the Enterprise.

Ship in a bottle

Moriarty, as played by Daniel Davis, first appeared in the episode "Elementary, Dear Data" (December 5, 1988). In that episode, Data (Brent Spiner)  had become too good at solving Sherlock Holmes mysteries on the holodeck, making the deduction and investigation parts of the stories — the fun parts — unnecessary. Geordi (LeVar Burton), bored in his role as Dr. Watson, suggested to Data that he needed to be challenged by a mystery, and asked the holodeck to create a character that would actually be capable of besting Data. Note that Geordi said "Data" and not "Sherlock Holmes." The holodeck, using heretofore unknown powers, created a Prof. Moriarty that is self-aware. Moriarty knows he is a citizen of 19th-century England but also finds himself able to access the Enterprise's computers, slowly becoming aware that he is a mere character in a high-tech simulation. He will eventually try to gain control of the ship. 

It will take a great deal of negotiation from Picard to convince him to stop his shenanigans. Moriarty is stored in the ship's memory to be dealt with at a later time. He will be restored accidentally in the episode "Ship in a Bottle" (January 24, 1993) where he will announce he was aware of the passage of time, even when stored in a memory bank. Once again, he will attempt to take over the Enterprise. At the end of the episode, Moriarty is duped into a simulation, and he is placed into a computerized cube that will provide him and his beloved wife with a lifetime of adventures. 

How is Moriarty here?

One can see why "Star Trek" writers are drawn to Moriarty. Like the denizens of the Enterprise, he is an intellectual. And like all life forms on "Star Trek," he demands respect and autonomy; when Picard is confronted with a new life form, he initially balks, unsure how to deal with the fact that his ship spontaneously created an adult human being. Moriarty is a character from classic Western literature, a canon that Trek is fairly obsessed with. Additionally, visiting Doyle's England provides "The Next Generation" with some much-needed visual variety; one can only look at grey-and-lavender hallways for so long before aching for dark earth tones. 

As a villain, though, Moriarty does possess a palpable fatuity. While the dramatic explanation for the character is laid out in detail, his actual presence on "Star Trek" feels a little like, say, Mr. Peabody and Sherman visiting Cleopatra. Author Loren D. Estleman once wrote a novel called "Sherlock Holmes vs. Dracula."  "Moriarty vs. Picard" tilts away from "essay on the nature of consciousness" pretty quickly, and falls headlong into the realm of Estleman-like fan fiction.

Moriarty's presence on "Picard" is, quite disappointingly, presented bluntly and without reason, making the character only that much more absurd. As a security device, Moriarty fires bullets at Worf, Raffi, and Riker, while also psychically playing noisy, isolated musical chords through the station's sound system. Riker eventually intuits that the notes being played are from "Pop Goes the Weasel," a tune he once whistled for Data in the "Next Generation" pilot episode. 

Riker also realizes this version of Moriarty is not the same one as before, and is actually a manifestation of Data's consciousness (!). Data is alive and nearby (!!).

It's an unfortunately silly twist that doesn't do anything to allay the character's inherent silliness. 

Daniel Davis (I)

IMDbPro Starmeter See rank

Daniel Davis

  • Contact info
  • 1 win & 1 nomination

Donal Logue, Daniel Davis, and Ben McKenzie in Gotham (2014)

  • Professor James Moriarty
  • 1988–1993 • 2 eps

Fran Drescher in The Nanny (1993)

  • 1993–1999 • 145 eps

Sean Connery in The Hunt for Red October (1990)

  • Captain Davenport

Christian Bale, Hugh Jackman, and Scarlett Johansson in The Prestige (2006)

  • Dr. Yablonski

Michael Dorn, Jonathan Frakes, Gates McFadden, Marina Sirtis, Brent Spiner, LeVar Burton, Patrick Stewart, Jeri Ryan, Michelle Hurd, Todd Stashwick, and Ed Speleers in Star Trek: Picard (2020)

  • Vic Wallace

Dispatches from Elsewhere (2020)

  • Octavio Coleman, Esq.

Jonny Lee Miller and Lucy Liu in Elementary (2012)

  • Antoine LaGrange

Christine Baranski and Audra McDonald in The Good Fight (2017)

  • Professor Harrison

Roses Are Blind (2018)

  • Addison Spelling

The Blacklist (2013)

  • Baldur Magnusson

Gotham (2014)

  • Jacob Skolimski

The Miraculous Year (2011)

  • Dr. Morgan Remus

Thru the Moebius Strip (2005)

  • Arthur (voice)

Kelsey Grammer, David Hyde Pierce, John Mahoney, Peri Gilpin, and Jane Leeves in Frasier (1993)

  • performer: "They Call Me Elfis", "Toys to the World"
  • performer: "Singin' in the Rain", "Sea Cruise"
  • performer: "The Twelve Days of Christmas" (uncredited)

Daniel Davis Film Reel

Personal details

  • 5′ 10¾″ (1.80 m)
  • November 26 , 1945
  • Gurdon, Arkansas, USA
  • Diane Davis (Sibling)
  • Other works Broadway: "Wrong Mountain" in 1999/2000 Earned a Tony nomination
  • 4 Interviews

Did you know

  • Trivia His take-off on Tom Cruise 's underwear dance in the film Risky Business (1983) became one of The Nanny (1993) 's classic moments.
  • Quotes I was attracted to Shakespeare before the drama teachers got to me. I was still a youngster when I saw A Midsummer Night's Dream, but I realized that magical world of language and idea was for me.
  • How old is Daniel Davis?
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  • Where was Daniel Davis born?

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Why Scotty didn't ask about his friends on Star Trek: The Next Generation's "Relics"

A fter Star Trek: The Undiscovered Country, no one really knows what transpired in the lives of the original crew of the Enterprise. Some retired. Others went on to work in the underground world like Mr. Spock, but we didn't know what had happened to Montgomery "Scotty" Scott (James Doohan) until the season six episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, "Relics."

Doohan returns in the episode with his character's life signal having been stored in the USS Jenolan's transporter buffer for seventy-five years. Scotty had been a passenger aboard the Jenolan when the ship got stuck in the Dyson sphere's gravity field. After seventy-five years, Scotty is amazed at the new technology, but he doesn't ask about his friends. And many fans have asked why over the years. As it turns out, one scene actually had Counselor Troi (Marina Sirtis) asking Scotty if he wanted to know what happened with his friends and family. Scotty's response was that he wasn't ready to hear that.

In Star Trek All Good Things: A Next Generation Companion, writer Ronald D. Moore said that he thought the topic would clutter things up. Troi would have to tell him about each of his friends, and that would take a while. On top of that, if Troi had told Scotty what had happened to everyone, it would have essentially been locking the crew into their futures. That would have changed the plot of Star Trek: Generations which released two years later. Though some might not think that was a bad thing, there was no way to know how things were actually going to go for the rest of the Star Trek: The Original Series' characters.

Though only Chekov (Walter Koenig) and Captain Kirk (William Shatner) showed up with Scotty on the bridge of the new Enterprise at the beginning of Star Trek: Generations, the writers/producers had no way of knowing if other actors from the original series would return to the big screen. This might not have been their thought process at first, considering the movie wasn't in production at the time, but they knew Star Trek was going to continue. To do that, it couldn't lock the characters away, although, Generations ended up doing that with Captain Kirk . Hopefully, the captain's fate will be corrected in a future iteration of Star Trek.

This article was originally published on redshirtsalwaysdie.com as Why Scotty didn't ask about his friends on Star Trek: The Next Generation's "Relics" .

Why Scotty didn't ask about his friends on Star Trek: The Next Generation's "Relics"

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'Star Trek: Discovery' ends as an underappreciated TV pioneer

Eric Deggans

Eric Deggans

Sonequa Martin-Green as Michael Burnham in Season 5, Episode 9 of Star Trek: Discovery.

Sonequa Martin-Green as Michael Burnham. Michael Gibson/Paramount+ hide caption

First, an admission: Though this column will offer a lot of discussion and defense of Star Trek: Discovery as a pivotal show, it won’t spend much time talking up the series’ current, final season or its finale episode, “Life, Itself,” dropping Thursday on Paramount+.

That’s because, for this critic, the last few seasons of Discovery have been a bit bogged down by the stuff that has always made it a tough sell as a Trek series: overly ambitious, serialized storylines that aren’t compelling; new characters and environments that don’t impress; plot twists which can be maddening in their lack of logic; big storytelling swings which can be confusing and predictable at once.

'Star Trek: Picard' soars by embracing the legacy of 'The Next Generation'

'Star Trek: Picard' soars by embracing the legacy of 'The Next Generation'

The show’s finale features the culmination of a sprawling scavenger hunt which found the crew of the starship Discovery bounding all over the place, searching for clues leading to a powerful technology pioneered by an alien race which created humanoid life throughout the galaxy. Their goal was to grab the technology before another race, ruthless and aggressive, could beat them to it, laying waste to everything.

It's no spoiler to reveal that Discovery ’s heroes avoid that nightmarish scenario, wrapping its fifth and final season with a conclusion centered on Sonequa Martin-Green’s ever-resourceful Capt. Michael Burnham and fond resolutions for a multitude of supporting characters (there’s even a space wedding!)

Still, this good-enough ending belies Discovery ’s status as a pioneering show which helped Paramount+ build a new vision for Star Trek in modern television – breaking ground that more creatively successful series like Star Trek: Picard and Star Trek: Strange New Worlds would follow years later.

And it all began with a singular character: Michael Burnham.

A take on Star Trek for modern TV

Discovery debuted in 2017 on CBS All Access — the streaming service which would become Paramount+ — facing a serious challenge.

As the first new Trek series in a dozen years, it had to chart a path which offered a new vision of the franchise without going too far — carving out a new corner in the universe of Capt. Kirk and Mr. Spock not long after the release of Star Trek Beyond , the third feature film produced by J. J. Abrams featuring rebooted versions of those classic characters.

Producers set Discovery ’s story 10 years before the days of Kirk and Spock (originally depicted on NBC for three seasons starting way back in 1966). The new series wouldn’t be centered on a starship captain, but its second in command: Burnham, a Black woman who also happened to be the hitherto unknown adopted daughter of Vulcan ambassador Sarek, Spock’s father (she would get promoted to captain of Discovery much later).

A Black human woman who was raised among the emotionally controlling, super-intellectual Vulcans? Who Trek fans had never heard of over nearly 60 years? Before I actually saw any episodes, my own feelings ranged from cautiously intrigued to cynically pessimistic.

But then I saw the first episode, which had an amazing early scene: Martin-Green as Burnham and Michelle Yeoh as Discovery Capt. Philippa Georgiou walking across an alien planet – two women of color marking the first step forward for Star Trek on a new platform.

People once sidelined in typical science fiction stories were now centerstage — a thrilling, historic moment.

Michelle Yeoh as Captain Philippa Georgiou and Sonequa Martin-Green as First Officer Michael Burnham in the very first episode of Star Trek: Discovery.

Michelle Yeoh as Captain Philippa Georgiou and Sonequa Martin-Green as First Officer Michael Burnham in the very first episode of Star Trek: Discovery. Jan Thijs/CBS hide caption

And it got better from there. Back in the day, Trek writers often felt hamstrung by creator Gene Roddenberry’s insistence that, in the future depicted by the show, humans were beyond social ills like greed, prejudice, sexism, war, money and personal friction. The writers chafed, wondering: How in the world do you build compelling stories on a starship where interpersonal human conflict doesn’t exist?

But Discovery found a workaround, putting Burnham in a position where logic led her to mutiny against her captain, attempting a strategy which ultimately failed — leaving humans in open combat with the legendarily warlike Klingons. Discovery also featured a long storyline which played out over an entire season, unlike many earlier Trek shows which tried to offer a new adventure every week.

'First, Last And Always, I Am A Fan': Michael Chabon Steers Latest 'Star Trek'

'First, Last And Always, I Am A Fan': Michael Chabon Steers Latest 'Star Trek'

The show’s first season had plenty of action, with Harry Potter alum Jason Isaacs emerging as a compelling and unique starship captain (saying more would be a spoiler; log onto Paramount+ and check out the first season). Fans saw a new vision for Trek technology, leveraging sleek, visceral special effects and action sequences worthy of a big budget movie, with design elements cribbed from several of the franchise’s films.

Later in its run, Discovery would debut Ethan Peck as Spock and Anson Mount as Christopher Pike, classic Trek characters who eventually got their own acclaimed series in Strange New Worlds . So far, five other Trek series have emerged on Paramount+ from ideas initially incubated on Discovery – including a critically acclaimed season of Picard which reunited the cast of Star Trek: The Next Generation .

Not bad for a series one TV critic eventually called among “the worst in the [ Trek ] franchise’s history.”

Discovery’s unappreciated legacy

Unfortunately, Discovery has taken some turns which didn’t work out quite so well. At the end of Discovery ’s second season, the starship jumped ahead in time nine centuries – perhaps to remove it from Strange New World ’s timeline? – placing it in an environment only distantly connected to classic Trek .

And while Discovery initially seemed cautious about referencing classic Trek in its stories, later series like Strange New Worlds and Picard learned the value of diving into the near-60-year-old franchise’s legacy – regularly tapping the show’s longtime appeal, rather than twisting into knots to avoid it.

There are likely fans of Discovery who would disagree with this analysis. But I think it helps explain why the series has never quite gotten its due in the world of Star Trek , initially shaded by skeptical fans and later overshadowed by more beloved products.

Now is the perfect time to pay tribute to a show which actually accomplished quite a lot – helping prove that Roddenberry’s brainchild still has a lot of narrative juice left in the 21st Century.

IMAGES

  1. James Moriarty

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  2. Everything You Should Know About Star Trek's Moriarty

    dr moriarty star trek next generation

  3. Professor Moriarty Star Trek The Next Generation TNG

    dr moriarty star trek next generation

  4. Star Trek: Picard: Daniel Davis Returns as Professor Moriarty with a

    dr moriarty star trek next generation

  5. Star Trek TNG: The 10 Most Powerful Villains Picard & The Crew Ever

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  6. Star Trek: 10 Best Worst Villains of All Time

    dr moriarty star trek next generation

VIDEO

  1. Star Trek TNG Moriarty On Existence

  2. I Find Your Lack of Faith Disturbing

  3. Moriarty's Conscious Before Programming? TNG Mistakes

  4. Star Trek The Next Generation Top 10 Villains #generoddenberry

  5. William Shatner Reveals ‘Definitive’ Documentary With Fan-Funded Legion M

  6. Lieutenant Barclay Meets Professor James Moriarty

COMMENTS

  1. "Star Trek: The Next Generation" Ship in a Bottle (TV Episode 1993)

    Ship in a Bottle: Directed by Alexander Singer. With Patrick Stewart, Jonathan Frakes, LeVar Burton, Michael Dorn. Lt. Barclay mistakenly awakes Moriarty in the forgotten holodeck program, who then makes his demands clear and unforgettable.

  2. James Moriarty (hologram)

    Background information []. Moriarty was played by Daniel Davis.. René Echevarria, Ronald D. Moore, and Brannon Braga were very eager to bring the Moriarty hologram back in a seventh season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation.Though Echevarria later forgot what happened to Moriarty in the proposed story pitch, he reckoned the character would likely have realized he had been duped ...

  3. Ship in a Bottle (Star Trek: The Next Generation)

    Moriarty wishes to escape the holodeck and was assured by the crew of the Enterprise that they would endeavor to find a way to do so, ... The episode was released as part of the Star Trek: The Next Generation season six DVD box set in the United States on December 3, 2002. A remastered HD version was released on Blu-ray optical disc, on June 24 ...

  4. Who is Professor James Moriarty?

    He's one of the few people able to outwit Holmes. But James Moriarty was also Data's nemesis in Star Trek. Played by Daniel Davis, we first met Professor Moriarty in Star Trek: The Next Generation episode " Elementary, Dear Data .". Data is playing Sherlock Holmes in the holodeck and invites Geordi to come along as his sidekick Dr. Watson.

  5. Everything You Should Know About Star Trek's Moriarty

    Moriarty debuts in the Season 2 "Star Trek: The Next Generation" episode "Elementary, Dear Data." As you might suspect, the series doesn't simply create a new character as an homage to the iconic ...

  6. "Star Trek: The Next Generation" Elementary, Dear Data (TV ...

    Elementary, Dear Data: Directed by Rob Bowman. With Patrick Stewart, Jonathan Frakes, LeVar Burton, Michael Dorn. An attempt to provide Data with a challenging Sherlock Holmes holodeck program backfires when its Professor Moriarty character accidentally becomes self-aware.

  7. Star Trek: Professor Moriarty Explained

    Star Trek: The Next Generation. Professor Moriarty starred in his own two-episode arc in Star Trek, and he was the center of one of Star Trek: The Next Generation 's most interesting moral dilemmas. The character of Moriarty made his debut in the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle short story "The Final Problem" in 1893, and he would quickly become ...

  8. James Moriarty

    Professor James Moriarty was a fictional character from the 19th century Sherlock Holmes novels by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. He was an adversary to Sherlock Holmes, a man with knowledge equal to that of Holmes. Appearing in two Holmes stories, Moriarty was defeated by Sherlock Holmes at Reichenbach Falls, but only at the cost of Holmes' own life. Katherine Pulaski read Sherlock Holmes novels and ...

  9. How Star Trek: The Next Generation's Original Story For Moriarty's

    Despite Daniel Lewis' return in Star Trek: Picard Season 3 not quite being what audiences expected, the actor's character Moriarty remains one of The Next Generation's most iconic villains ...

  10. INTERVIEW: Trek's Moriarty, Daniel Davis

    So good that you probably think he's British. However, Davis - who so memorably portrayed Professor Moriarty in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episodes " Elementary, Dear Data " and " Ship in a Bottl e," and Niles, the butler, for six seasons on The Nanny - hails from Arkansas. Yes, Arkansas. These days, Davis continues to act ...

  11. Professor Moriarty (Star Trek)

    Professor James Moriarty is a recurring antagonist in Star Trek: The Next Generation, serving as the main antagonist of the episodes "Elementary Dear Data" and "Ship in a Bottle". He was portrayed by Daniel Davis. While playing the parts of Holmes and Watson on the holodeck, Lieutenant Geordi LaForge became frustrated with the fact Lieutenant Commander Data instantly knew the solution to every ...

  12. Daniel Davis Talks About His "Different" Moriarty In 'Star Trek: Picard

    The hologram of James Moriarty played by Daniel Davis was created in the second season Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Elementary, Dear Data" by Geordi La Forge, who tasked the ...

  13. "Star Trek: The Next Generation" Elementary, Dear Data (TV ...

    "Star Trek: The Next Generation" Elementary, Dear Data (TV Episode 1988) Daniel Davis as Professor James Moriarty ... Daniel Davis as Professor James Moriarty. Menu. Movies. Release Calendar Top 250 Movies Most Popular Movies Browse Movies by Genre Top Box Office Showtimes & Tickets ... spider, I feel the strings vibrate whenever anyone new ...

  14. Lieutenant Barclay Meets Professor James Moriarty

    Star Trek The Next Generation Season 06 Episode 12 Ship in a Bottle

  15. WARP FIVE: Daniel Davis on the Return of the Dastardly ...

    Star Trek: Picard 's " The Bounty " marks Davis' third appearance as Professor James Moriarty. On his return as the Holmesian foe, Davis remarks, "Getting back into the character was a little strange because it wasn't really Moriarty from The Next Generation.". "There was something slightly askew about it," explains Davis.

  16. How Is TNG's Moriarty Back In Star Trek: Picard Season 3?

    Moriarty was introduced in the Star Trek: The Next Generation season 2 episode "Elementary Dear Data." He was the foil for Data (Brent Spiner), who enjoyed role playing as Sherlock Holmes, with Geordi La Forge (LeVar Burton) as Watson, on the holodeck. Moriarty was upgraded into a program who could challenge Data's intellect, and the virtual villain quickly became self-aware and attempted to ...

  17. Star Trek: Picard's Daniel Davis Shares His Thoughts On Moriarty's

    Moriarty returned in Star Trek: The Next Generation's "Ship In A Bottle" upset that Picard lied about finding a way to remove him from the holodeck.That actually wasn't true, but the villain ...

  18. Daniel Davis

    Daniel Davis is an American film, stage and television actor.. Davis is best known for portraying Niles the butler on the sitcom The Nanny (1993 to 1999), and for his two guest appearances as Professor Moriarty on Star Trek: The Next Generation (a role he reprised on Star Trek: Picard), affecting an upper class English accent for both roles. He voices the intelligent Cro-Magnon, Longhair, from ...

  19. Star Trek: The Next Generation

    Watch Star Trek: The Next Generation — Season 6, Episode 12 with a subscription on Paramount+, or buy it on Fandango at Home, Prime Video. Professor Moriarty from the Sherlock Holmes holodeck ...

  20. Brent Spiner To Return As Lore, Daniel Davis As Professor Moriarty, In

    Moriarty first appeared as a hologram created by Geordi La Forge (LeVar Burton) in the "Star Trek: The Next Generation" season 2 episode titled "Elementary, Dear Data."

  21. 'Star Trek: Picard': Daniel Davis on Moriarty's Surprising Return

    Published March 23, 2023, 3:00 p.m. ET. Powered by Reelgood. After three decades off the screen, Moriarty — and Daniel Davis, the actor who portrays him — is back on today's Star Trek ...

  22. Star Trek Picard Season 3: Moriarty Explained

    Moriarty's presence on "Picard" is a little perplexing, but it was perhaps no more perplexing than his two previous appearances on "Star Trek: The Next Generation" where Moriarty, as a hologram ...

  23. Daniel Davis

    Daniel Davis. Actor: Star Trek: The Next Generation. This Arkansas native was born on 26 November 1945 to parents who owned a movie theater. He often felt that his desire to become an actor came from the fact that he spent so much time in the theater's "crying room" for babies - and listening to the likes of Tyrone Power and others. His first "professional" work came at the age...

  24. Why Scotty didn't ask about his friends on Star Trek: The Next ...

    In Star Trek All Good Things: A Next Generation Companion, writer Ronald D. Moore said that he thought the topic would clutter things up. Troi would have to tell him about each of his friends, and ...

  25. 'Star Trek: Discovery' ends as an underappreciated TV pioneer

    Producers set Discovery's story 10 years before the days of Kirk and Spock (originally depicted on NBC for three seasons starting way back in 1966).The new series wouldn't be centered on a ...