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Nova Scotia Travel Guide

Last Updated: November 10, 2023

an aerial view of a scenic Nova Scotia landscape in Canada

That welcoming atmosphere — combined with over 100 beaches, picturesque lighthouses, fresh seafood, and endless rugged coastline — makes visiting Nova Scotia an exciting (and underrated) destination in Eastern Canada.

Outside the capital city of Halifax, Nova Scotia is dotted with tiny fishing villages and coastal towns. Drive further north, and you’ll hit scenic Cape Breton Island which comes alive with vivid fall foliage each year along its Cabot Trail. In short, Nova Scotia is a province perfect for road trips.

Another bonus: Nova Scotia doesn’t see nearly as many tourists as the country’s larger cities, making it a somewhat off-the-beaten-trail destination that’s much more affordable than many of the more popular cities in Canada.

This travel guide to Nova Scotia can help you plan your trip, save money, and make the most of your visit to this beautiful east coast province!

Table of Contents

  • Things to See and Do
  • Typical Costs
  • Suggested Budget
  • Money-Saving Tips
  • Where to Stay
  • How to Get Around
  • How to Stay Safe
  • Best Places to Book Your Trip
  • Related Blogs on Nova Scotia

Top 5 Things to See and Do in Nova Scotia

The iconic white lighthouse in Peggy's Cove, Nova Scotia on a sunny summer day

1. Hike the Skyline Trail

The Skyline Trail is easily the most popular hike in Cape Breton Highlands National Park. It stretches 6.5 kilometers (4 miles) through thick forest and then along the coast to reach a viewing platform overlooking the ocean. It’s a breathtaking walk on which you might even encounter moose. The hike is suitable for all levels and takes between 1.5-3 hours. Make sure to bring your own water, good shoes, and clothing layers as the weather can change quickly. The most popular time to visit is July, August, and September but many people come to see the autumn leaves change in October. Park admission is 8.50 CAD.

2. Tour the Alexander Keith’s Brewery

Alexander Keith is a legend in Nova Scotia. He opened his brewery in 1820, became mayor of Halifax, and was so wildly popular that Halifax throws a massive birthday party for him on the waterfront every October. Today, the 200-year-old brewery is one of the oldest in North America. Take a tour of the Halifax brewery to learn more and sample some of the limited edition beers at “Stag’s Head” pub at the end of the tour. Tours are 29.95 CAD.

3. Hang out in Halifax

Halifax is Nova Scotia’s cool capital city. It’s home to half a dozen universities so it has a lively nightlife, a thriving music scene, and countless trendy restaurants and craft breweries. Stroll the waterfront boardwalk, grab a lobster roll, and spend the evening at a local pub. Take the ferry over to Dartmouth across the harbor, known as ‘Halifax’s Brooklyn’ and check out the live music at New Scotland Brewing Company. The city has a youthful, arty vibe and is worth visiting for a couple of days.

4. Visit Peggy’s Cove Lighthouse

There are some 170 lighthouses in Nova Scotia, but Peggy’s Cove Lighthouse is the most famous. Once you see it, you’ll understand why it’s one of the most photographed lighthouses in the world. It’s a quintessential red-topped lighthouse standing on a rocky shore overlooking the Atlantic. Walk around and enjoy the ocean views and snap some photos. Beware: rogue waves are common, even on calm days. It’s possible to reach the lighthouse via bus and taxi but it is much easier by car.

5. Drive the Cabot Trail

Other things to see and do in nova scotia, 1. go tidal bore rafting in shubenacadie.

The Shubenacadie River’s rapids in the Bay of Fundy are powered by the highest tides in the world. One minute you’re floating down a peaceful river keeping an eye out for bald eagles and other wildlife and the next minute the river turns into a raging, foaming mass of rapids. When the tide changes twice a day, the tidal bore temporarily reverses the flow of the river, resulting in this wild river ride. A four-hour tour includes the guided rafting excursion, safety flotation gear, extra mud sliding on request (yes!), and post-rafting showers for when you need to clean up. Make sure to bring an extra clean change of clothes as well as a towel. A four-hour rafting trip starts at 95 CAD.

2. Go whale watching

In the summer and fall, 12 species of whales visit the waters around Nova Scotia, including pilot whales, minke whales, giant humpbacks, and the endangered North Atlantic right whale. There are tons of whale-watching tours to choose from in the area, with most operating outside of Halifax. Mariner Cruises takes you out for a 2.5-hour boating tour for 50 CAD departing from Westport on Brier Island, while larger groups like Lunenburg Whale Watching Tours start at 70 CAD.

3. Enjoy summer on the water

Summer is short in Nova Scotia, so when the weather is nice and the sun comes out, Nova Scotians hit the water to go sailing, kayaking, paddle boarding, and canoeing. Surfing is also big here, with Lawrencetown Beach being one of the more popular areas to find the biggest waves. Go swimming at Melmerby Beach or take a kayak around Kejimkujik National Park. Kayak rentals cost around 25 CAD for two hours or 32 CAD for the entire day.

4. Wander the Annapolis Royal Historic Gardens

Spanning 17 acres of greenery, these historical gardens overlook a tidal river valley and include an enormous rose collection (best seen in July) as well as an 18th-century Governor’s Garden and a 19th-century Victorian Garden. You can check out the reconstructed 1671 Acadian House or grab a coffee and light lunch at The Elm Tree Café (seasonal). It’s 16 CAD to visit except November to April when there is only a suggested donation of 5 CAD as the Gardens are not maintained during the winter months.

5. Visit the Alexander Graham Bell Historic Site

This museum in Cape Breton is host to a rich collection of artifacts and documents chronicling the life and career of Bell, the inventor of the telephone. The collection was accumulated by his family during their time here in Baddeck, Cape Breton. In the parlor, you can see Bell’s personal effects, like his favorite jacket, notebook, and walking stick. You can also take a behind-the-scenes “White Glove Tour” of the artifact storage facilities. The site is open May-October and admission is 8.50 CAD (13 CAD for the white glove tour).

6. Explore the Highland Village Museum

Over the centuries, the Canadian Maritimes have been heavily influenced by Scottish and Irish immigration. This outdoor pioneer museum and Gaelic culture experience highlights that history. The 43-acre site overlooking Bras d’Or Lake includes historic buildings like three frame houses, a mill, and a forge. You can take part in a traditional céilidh dance, hear Gaelic singing, and even practice a little of the language yourself. It’s open from June to October and costs 11 CAD.

7. Tour the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic

This museum depicts Nova Scotia’s maritime history with exhibits on boatbuilding, World War II convoys, the Titanic, and the Halifax Explosion (a huge disaster that happened in 1917, when two ships carrying ammunition ran into each other and destroyed much of the city). It’s a very comprehensive overview of the region’s history. Admission is 5.15 CAD from November-April and 9.55 CAD from May-October.

8. Visit nearby New Brunswick or Prince Edward Island

These two provinces are close to Nova Scotia and can be visited as day trips (or multi-day trips) if you have your own vehicle. Don’t miss New Brunswick’s Fundy National Park to see the world’s highest tides. In P.E.I., you can soak up some tranquility on the sea (and eat lots of seafood) and visit the Anne of Green Gables house.

9. Explore Lunenburg

Lunenburg is one of the most colorful towns you’ll ever come across. With its narrow streets and colonial 18th- and 19th-century buildings painted in bright hues of pinks, oranges, and greens, you’ll feel like you’ve stepped back into the past. There are still tall ships in the harbor and even an operational blacksmith hammering away on the waterfront. The harbor is home to the famous Bluenose II, a replica schooner of the original Bluenose boat that’s featured on the Canadian dime (ten-cent coin). The Bluenose was a famous fishing/racing schooner that went undefeated in her 18-year run and is an iconic part of Canadian history.

10. Tour the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

If there’s just one museum you visit in Halifax, make it this one . Pier 21 was the immigration point for one million newcomers to Canada between 1928 and 1971. You’ll learn about 400 years of Canadian immigration history through first-person stories, archival photos, artifacts (including trunks and personal treasures), and digital documentation. Exhibits are incredibly interactive and you can even research your family’s pre-1935 immigration records from all ports of entry in North America. Admission is 15.50 CAD.

11. Relax in Kejimkujik National Park

For a taste of Maritime nature, come to this national park to paddle, hike, camp, and relax. Here you’ll find ancient rock carvings (petroglyphs), canoe routes, and coastal wilderness punctuated with sandy beaches and wildlife. To learn more about the Mi’kmaq people who traditionally have called the region home, join a storytelling session, take a guided petroglyph tour, or participate in a canoe-building workshop. Admission to the park is 6.25 CAD.

For more information on other destinations in Canada, check out these guides:

  • Calgary Travel Guide
  • Montreal Travel Guide
  • Ottawa Travel Guide
  • Quebec City Travel Guide
  • Toronto Travel Guide
  • Vancouver Travel Guide
  • Vancouver Island Travel Guide

Nova Scotia Travel Costs

A stunning scenic view of a lake and forest in beautiful Nova Scotia, Canada

Hostel prices – Hostels are virtually non-existent in Nova Scotia. The only exception is Halifax. A bed in a 4-6-person dorm costs 30-35 CAD per night. A private room costs about 78-90 CAD per night. Expect basic amenities like free Wi-Fi and self-catering facilities.

For those traveling with a tent, camping is available around the province starting at 27 CAD per night. This gets you a basic plot without electricity for two people.

Budget hotel prices – Budget hotels start around 105 CAD per night for a place outside of Halifax. Within Halifax, most budget hotels start at around 130 CAD per night. Expect basic amenities like free Wi-Fi, TV, AC, and a coffee/tea maker. Prices are lower during the off-season.

Airbnb is available all around Nova Scotia. Private rooms start around 50-75 CAD per night, though they average double (or even triple) that price. An entire home/apartment costs around 100 CAD per night, though they average closer to 160 CAD (200 CAD in Halifax). Book early to find the best deals.

Food -In Nova Scotia, seafood is king. Be sure to try scallops and oysters, wild blueberries, lobster, and donair (thinly sliced beef in a pita with a sauce that’s similar to kebab; it’s the official food of Halifax). Also, be sure to sample more general Canadian staples like poutine (fries with gravy and cheese curds), beaver tails (fried dough with maple syrup), Canadian bacon, and the oddly tasty ketchup chips.

You can find cheap street food eats like donair for around 7 CAD (go to Johnny K’s), or a small pizza on Halifax’s “Pizza Corner” (an intersection at Blowers Street and Grafton Street full of pizza places) for less than 10 CAD.

A fast food combo meal (think McDonald’s) costs around 12 CAD. A lobster roll at an inexpensive restaurant is about 20 CAD, while lobster poutine is closer to 18 CAD. A bowl of pasta (such as scallop carbonara) costs around 20 CAD. A beer to go with it is about 7 CAD while a glass of wine starts at 9 CAD.

A meal at a higher-end restaurant costs about 40 CAD for a steak or duck entree without a drink, while lobster is closer to 55 CAD.

If you cook for yourself, expect to spend 50-65 CAD on groceries per week. This gets you basic staples like rice, pasta, seasonal produce, and some meat or fish.

Some recommended places to eat include No. 9 Coffee Bar (Lunenburg), The Barn Coffee & Social House (Mahone Bay), The Economy Shoe Shop (Halifax), McKelvie’s Restaurant (Halifax), and The Wooden Monkey (Halifax).

Backpacking Nova Scotia Suggested Budgets

If you’re backpacking Nova Scotia, expect to spend about 70 CAD per day. This assumes you’re staying in a hostel, cooking all your meals, limiting your drinking, taking public transit to get around, and doing mostly free activities like swimming and hiking. If you plan on drinking, add another 10-15 CAD to your daily budget.

On a mid-range budget of 180 CAD per day, you can stay in a private Airbnb, eat out for a few meals, enjoy a couple of drinks, rent a car to get around, and do more paid activities like rent a kayak, visit museums, and day trips to a nearby province.

On a “luxury” budget of 280 CAD per day or more, you can stay in a hotel, rent a car, drink more, eat out for most meals, and do whatever tours and activities you want. This is just the ground floor for luxury though. The sky is the limit!

You can use the chart below to get some idea of how much you need to budget daily, depending on your travel style. Keep in mind these are daily averages — some days you’ll spend more, some days you’ll spend less (you might spend less every day). We just want to give you a general idea of how to make your budget. Prices are in CAD.

Nova Scotia Travel Guide: Money-Saving Tips

Nova Scotia can be an affordable destination if you budget properly. It gets more expensive during peak summer season and early fall (everyone comes to see the leaves change color). Here are some of my ways to save money in Nova Scotia during your visit:

  • Stay with a local – If you plan ahead, you can usually find a Couchsurfing host in Halifax. This way, you not only have a free place to stay, but you’ll have a local host that can share their insider tips and advice.
  • Take a free walking tour – Walking tours are a great way to get familiar with a city and its culture. Halifax Free Walking Tours offers daily informative walking tours in the summer. In the off-season, tours are available by request. Just be sure to tip your guide at the end!
  • Look for free events – Many of Nova Scotia’s events and festivals are free, including Halifax’s Busker Festival in July. Many towns (like Pictou) also have free summer concerts in public spaces. Check the Tourism Nova Scotia website for more info!
  • Go camping – If you want to camp, use novascotia.goingtocamp.com to find available campsites around the province. A two-person site costs around 27-35 CAD.
  • Look for the happy hours – The Ultimate Happy Hours website lists all the happy hour drink and food specials around Halifax. They update with new info frequently!
  • Get the Museum Pass – If you plan on visiting lots of museums, the Nova Scotia Museum Pass lets you pay one price to access any of the province’s museum sites. It’s valid for 12 months and costs 47 CAD.
  • Bring a water bottle – The tap water here is safe to drink so bring a reusable water bottle to save money. LifeStraw makes a reusable bottle with a built-in filter to ensure your water is always safe and clean.

Where to Stay in Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia doesn’t have many hostels and most of the existing ones are in Halifax. Here are my suggested places to stay:

  • HI Halifax Heritage House Hostel
  • Halifax Backpacker
  • Bear on the Lake Guesthouse

How to Get Around Nova Scotia

A quaint house along the rugged coast of sunny Nova Scotia, Canada

Public transportation – Halifax is the only major urban center in Nova Scotia and locals depend on a public bus system to get around. Halifax’s public buses can take you all around the inner city and into the suburbs, but the downtown area is very walkable. Fares are 2.75 CAD.

You can take the MetroX bus from the airport to downtown St. John’s for 4.25 CAD (exact change required). There’s also a ferry connecting downtown Halifax to Dartmouth for 2.75 CAD.

Bus – Taking the bus is the best way to get around Nova Scotia if you don’t have a car. Maritime Bus connects most towns in the province. A two-hour trip from Halifax to Lunenburg is 26 CAD, while Halifax to Mahone Bay takes an hour and costs 20.25 CAD. Halifax to Sydney (Cape Breton) costs 72 CAD and takes 6 hours.

To find bus routes and prices, use BusBud .

Taxi – Taxis are not cheap here. Their base rate is 3.75 CAD, and it’s an additional 1.70 CAD per kilometer afterward. Prices add up fast so I’d avoid them if you can.

Ridesharing – Uber is available in Halifax, but the city is easily walkable so I’d skip the ridesharing if you can.

Car Rental – Car rentals can be found for as little as 30 CAD per day for a multi-day rental. If you want to take advantage of all that Nova Scotia has to offer, this is your best option. For the best car rental prices, use Discover Cars .

When to Go to Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia is at its busiest in the summer, with the best weather occurring between June and August. Temperatures often exceed 25°C (78°F). Keep in mind that accommodation prices are higher during this time, but tourist attractions are never overly crowded compared to elsewhere in Canada.

Both early fall and late spring are also excellent times to visit. The weather is warm, you can do all the outdoor exploration you want, and the tourist season isn’t in full swing. This is the best time to drive Cape Breton’s Cabot Trail. The fall colors are particularly pretty.

Winters in Nova Scotia are cold and wet, with temperatures ranging between from -17-0°C (0-32°F) from December to March. If you come during this time, be prepared for all weather types and dress in layers because it is cold. Keep in mind that many businesses shut down for the winter (mostly outside of Halifax). In short, I’d avoid a winter visit unless you’re here for winter sports and activities.

How to Stay Safe in Nova Scotia

You don’t have to worry much about crime in Nova Scotia — it’s incredibly safe to visit. Your greatest risk is petty crime like pickpocketing, but even that is super rare. Overall, I really wouldn’t worry about crime here. Getting hurt hiking is more likely to happen than any crime!

Like much of rural Canada, Nova Scotia has ticks that carry Lyme Disease. If you’re hiking, try to wear long sleeves or pants, or stick to well-trodden trails. Check yourself for ticks after spending time in nature.

Solo female travelers should generally feel safe here. However, the standard precautions you take anywhere apply (never leave your drink unattended at the bar, never walk home alone intoxicated, etc.). For more information, check out one of the many solo female travel blogs in the city.

If you’re visiting in the winter, make sure you keep an eye on the weather — especially if you’re driving a car. Road conditions can change rapidly.

Hurricanes can occasionally make it up to the Maritimes, so keep an eye on them if you’re visiting during hurricane season (June-November).

If you experience an emergency, dial 911 for assistance.

When in doubt, always trust your instincts. If a taxi driver seems shady, get out. If your hotel or accommodation is seedier than you thought, go somewhere else. Make copies of your personal documents, including your passport and ID, in case of an emergency.

The most important piece of advice I can offer is to purchase good travel insurance. Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past.

Nova Scotia Travel Guide: The Best Booking Resources

These are my favorite companies to use when I travel. They consistently have the best deals, offer world-class customer service and great value, and overall, are better than their competitors. They are the companies I use the most and are always the starting point in my search for travel deals.

  • Skyscanner – Skyscanner is my favorite flight search engine. They search small websites and budget airlines that larger search sites tend to miss. They are hands down the number one place to start.
  • Hostelworld – This is the best hostel accommodation site out there with the largest inventory, best search interface, and widest availability.
  • Booking.com – The best all around booking site that constantly provides the cheapest and lowest rates. They have the widest selection of budget accommodation. In all my tests, they’ve always had the cheapest rates out of all the booking websites.
  • Get Your Guide – Get Your Guide is a huge online marketplace for tours and excursions. They have tons of tour options available in cities all around the world, including everything from cooking classes, walking tours, street art lessons, and more!
  • SafetyWing – Safety Wing offers convenient and affordable plans tailored to digital nomads and long-term travelers. They have cheap monthly plans, great customer service, and an easy-to-use claims process that makes it perfect for those on the road.
  • LifeStraw – My go-to company for reusable water bottles with built-in filters so you can ensure your drinking water is always clean and safe.
  • Unbound Merino – They make lightweight, durable, easy-to-clean travel clothing.
  • Top Travel Credit Cards – Points are the best way to cut down travel expenses. Here’s my favorite point earning credit cards so you can get free travel!

Nova Scotia Travel Guide: Related Articles

Want more info? Check out all the articles I’ve written on backpacking/traveling Canada and continue planning your trip:

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How to get around in Nova Scotia

Helen Earley

May 12, 2022 • 7 min read

Cycling along the Halifax waterfront.

Hopping on a bike is one of many ways to get around in Nova Scotia © Destination Canada

One of Canada ’s three “Maritime Provinces”, Nova Scotia is easy to navigate if you have your own set of wheels. But there are plenty of transport options to add spice to your journey, including scenic ferry rides, once-in-a-lifetime helicopter charters, and world-class bicycle routes. Here’s our guide to traversing this wonderful, wild region on Canada’s east coast.

Halifax , known to the native Mi’kmaq people as “K’jipuktuk” (Great Harbor), is the largest Canadian city east of Montreal, with daily flight connections to major cities across Canada and the eastern United States, as well as direct services to Europe (London is roughly five hours away.) The main air hub, Halifax Stanfield International Airport (YHZ), is a large, full-service airport with car rental facilities, restaurants, hotels and a well-stocked tourist information desk.

It’s easy to get from the airport to downtown Halifax if you don’t have a car. There is a ground transportation desk located just after the arrivals area, where you can ask for help.

Your choices are a taxi or airport limousine (whether you take a cab or a limo, it’s the same standard flat rate); a public bus (Metro X Route 320), Driver Dave’s (a reliable door-to-door ride-sharing service popular with students and budget travelers), and Uber.

Private air charter

It sounds extravagant (and it is) but if you have a group of friends and a few bucks to spend, a helicopter ride is an unforgettable way to experience Nova Scotia’s oceans and islands. Halifax airport-based Vision Air Services offers a heli-picnic island escape package (C$500 per person) in addition to private charters, while Breton Air, based at J.A. Douglas McCurdy airport in Sydney, provides private charters and transport to Cape Breton Island’s most exclusive lodges, retreats, and golf courses.

Take care not to confuse Sydney, Nova Scotia (YQY) with Sydney Australia (SYD) – a mix-up that occurs with surprising regularity (although it’s generally travelers who are hoping to get to Australia that end up in Cape Breton, not the other way around!)

A white and blue ferry crosses a large body of water en route to Nova Scotia, Canada. The image is framed by the branches of a tree in the foreground.

One of the nicest ways to arrive, or bid farewell to Nova Scotia is by sea. Large, comfortable car ferries operate between Yarmouth, Nova Scotia and Maine (3.5 hours); Digby, Nova Scotia and Saint John, New Brunswick (2 hours, 15 minutes); and Caribou, Nova Scotia to Wood Islands, which form part of Prince Edward Island (1 hour, 15 minutes) – all times approximate, and dependent on weather.

There is also a ferry service between Sydney, Cape Breton and two ports in Newfoundland: Port Aux Basques (7 hours) and Argentia (16 hours.)

Within Nova Scotia, there are small car ferries, established for local use in places where a ferry is more economical than building a bridge or causeway. These charming, blue, flat-decked ferries fill up quickly and take only a few minutes to complete their crossing, and the fare is free. There are seven provincial car ferries throughout Nova Scotia – seek them out to add some extra maritime flavor to your trip. 

Elsewhere, the 15-minute ferry ride between Halifax and Dartmouth is the oldest saltwater ferry in North America, costing no more than a bus fare for a return journey. Grab a front seat on the upper deck and take in the views. If you are adventurous, consider returning on foot across the MacDonald Bridge.

For those who love traveling off the beaten track, North West Arm Boat Tours runs an affordable McNab’s Island ferry service using a RHIB (rigid hulled inflatable boat) and is a thrilling way to explore Halifax Harbor and the Northwest Arm.

When is the best time to visit Nova Scotia?

There is only one way to get to or from Nova Scotia by train: a VIA Rail Halifax-Montréal service, named The Ocean which takes approximately 21 hours. Many of the former rail beds in Maritime Canada have been replaced as part of a “rails to trails” project. Walking or cycling along these trails is one of the best free things to do in Nova Scotia.

A road curves through the green hillsides of Cape Breton Highlands National Park, Nova Scotia.

Car or Motorcycle

An extensive highway system links most towns and cities in Nova Scotia, making cars and motorcycles the most convenient way of getting around the province.

Larger Nova Scotia highways are referred to as “100-series” highways (101, 103, etc.), circumnavigating, and at times crossing, the province. But as a sightseer, you may prefer to take the “old road” (for example, Highway 1, or Highway 3). You never know what you’ll find along the way, from beaches and coves to yard sales to antique shops. You might even see some fruit and vegetable stands that use an “honesty box” system for payment (it’s a good idea to keep some change handy.)

Conveniently, Tourism Nova Scotia has created names for some of the best scenic routes in Nova Scotia, such as the Lighthouse Route, or the Glooscap Trail, each one with distinct signage. These can be reliably followed using the Nova Scotia Tourism Regions Map . You can get free paper copies of this map at the airport, and Nova Scotia tourist information centers.

If you’re winter driving in Nova Scotia, it’s advisable to have winter tires, and if you hear a forecast for freezing rain, stay off the roads altogether. The provincial government publishes a useful real-time highway report that shows construction and roads made impassable by snow or ice.

Six amazing road trips in Nova Scotia

Maritime Bus is a coach service with over 50 locations throughout the Maritimes, favored by students, budget travelers, and used by locals as a way to deliver large packages at a cheaper rate than the post office. In Halifax, the Maritime Bus station is located adjacent to the VIA rail train station, steps away from the Halifax waterfront.

Within Halifax, Halifax Transit has bus routes around the city – fares are paid by cash, and you must have the correct change.

Best places to visit in Nova Scotia 

Taxi and Ride Shares

Halifax has a good selection of taxi operators who use an old-fashioned meter system and accept credit, debit, and cash. Although ride-sharing services are popular in other world cities, heavily regulated Halifax was slow to embrace the trend. Finally, in November 2020, ride-sharing services were permitted to operate, despite protests from traditional taxi firms. You may notice that “grabbing an Uber” doesn’t quite roll off the tongue in Halifax as easily as in other cities.

The Skyline Trail: a wooden walkway running down a green hillside in Cape Breton Highlands National Park, Canada. In the background, the sea is visible.

There are many ways to get around Nova Scotia on two wheels: the rails to trails system has created cycle routes such as the Rum Runners Trail (Lunenburg to Halifax), The Harvest Moon Trailway (Annapolis Royal to Grand-Pré ), and the Celtic Shores Coastal Trail (Port Hastings to Inverness).

Whether you’re taking a guided tour, or a solo trip, Cycle Nova Scotia can help with trip planning, resources and GPS downloads. In Halifax, you can rent bikes and e-bikes from I Heart Bikes on the Halifax waterfront.

If you are visiting Nova Scotia in September, you can join over a thousand cyclists participating in the Grand Fondo, Baie Sainte Marie , a monumental ride through the Municipality of Clare in southwest Nova Scotia that ends with a lobster dinner for participants.

Accessible transportation in Nova Scotia

Like many cities, Nova Scotia still has a long way to go in terms of accessibility, with few options for accessible accommodations in rural Nova Scotia. In Halifax, the waterfront boardwalk is accessible, but its downtown streets, leading up to the Halifax Citadel , are steep.

Most taxi companies in Halifax have wheelchair-accessible vans, bookable in advance, and Halifax Transit buses have spaces for wheelchair users (the driver will lower the bus for entry/exit and secure the chair using straps.)

One of Nova Scotia’s most recent accessible “wins” was to install a viewing deck at Peggy’s Cove, so that wheelchair users can enjoy a close-up view of the lighthouse and rocks, In Cape Breton, Inverness Beach is aiming to become the most accessible beach in Nova Scotia, with two beach wheelchairs, floating chairs and sand mats that make it easier to walk on the sand.

Parasport Nova Scotia has a good list of accessible parks, beaches and barrier-free fishing sites in Nova Scotia , while local Youtube channel, Accessible Adventurers provides no-nonsense (and sometimes up close and personal) video accounts documenting the challenges of getting around in Nova Scotia as a quadriplegic.

For additional information, download Lonely Planet’s free Accessible Travel guide .

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THE 10 BEST Nova Scotia Bus Tours

Bus tours in nova scotia.

  • Ports of Call Tours
  • Historical & Heritage Tours
  • Sightseeing Tours
  • Up to 1 hour
  • 1 to 4 hours
  • 4 hours to 1 day
  • Chinese (Simplified)
  • Likely to Sell Out

bus travel nova scotia

  • The ranking of tours, activities, and experiences available on Tripadvisor is determined by several factors including the revenue generated by Tripadvisor from these bookings, the frequency of user clicks, and the volume and quality of customer reviews. Occasionally, newly listed offerings may be prioritized and appear higher in the list. The specific placement of these new listings may vary.

bus travel nova scotia

1. Peggy's Cove and Lunenburg Tour (small group)

bus travel nova scotia

2. Peggy’s Cove & Halifax Historic Tour

bus travel nova scotia

3. Halifax & Peggys Cove & Coastal

bus travel nova scotia

4. Half Day Small Group Tour in Peggy's Cove and Titanic Cemetery

bus travel nova scotia

5. Wine and Lunch Escape

bus travel nova scotia

6. Private Heart Of The Island Tour in Nova Scotia

bus travel nova scotia

7. Explore Baddeck and Cabot Trail in Nova Scotia

bus travel nova scotia

8. 6 Hours Mini Cabot Trail Tour

bus travel nova scotia

9. Baddeck & Bell Museum Tour

bus travel nova scotia

10. Valley Wine Tour

bus travel nova scotia

11. Best of Halifax Small Group Tour with Peggy's Cove and Citadel

bus travel nova scotia

12. Best of Cape Breton Small Group Tour from Sydney

bus travel nova scotia

13. Shore Excursion of the Glenora Distillery in Cape Breton

bus travel nova scotia

14. Private Cabot Trail Discovery Tour

bus travel nova scotia

15. Lunenburg Small Group Express from Halifax + Lobster Roll Lunch

bus travel nova scotia

16. Hidden Gems Tour Lunenburg

bus travel nova scotia

17. Peggy's Cove Day Trip from Halifax

bus travel nova scotia

18. Eat Halifax Food Tour

bus travel nova scotia

19. Cabot Trail Discovery Tour

bus travel nova scotia

20. Cabot Trail High Flyer

bus travel nova scotia

21. Peggy’s Cove/Mahone Bay & Lunenburg

bus travel nova scotia

22. 1 Hour Blue Rocks Excursions from Lunenburg

bus travel nova scotia

23. Shared Cruise Excursion - "Mini" Cabot Trail

bus travel nova scotia

24. Halifax Now & Then

bus travel nova scotia

25. Bay of Fundy / Hall's Harbour

bus travel nova scotia

26. Wine Enthusiast Tour

bus travel nova scotia

27. Peggy's Cove Sunset + Halifax Dinner Small Group Night Tour

bus travel nova scotia

28. Peggy’s Cove

bus travel nova scotia

29. Cabot Trail Private Full Day Tour

bus travel nova scotia

30. Peggy’s Cove Small Group Sunset Tour from Halifax

What travellers are saying.

Travel D

  • Peggy's Cove Express Small Group from Halifax
  • Peggy's Cove and Lunenburg Tour (small group)
  • Peggy’s Cove & Halifax Historic Tour
  • Half Day Small Group Tour in Peggy's Cove and Titanic Cemetery
  • Private Tour in Halifax by a Luxury Vehicle with Informative Guide
  • Alternative Routes
  • Gray Line Halifax
  • TayMac Tours
  • TJ's Van & Car Pool Services Inc
  • Canada Airport Transfers

Nova Scotia: Bus Tours Information

THE 10 BEST Nova Scotia Bus Tours

Bus tours in nova scotia.

  • Ports of Call Tours
  • Historical & Heritage Tours
  • Sightseeing Tours
  • Up to 1 hour
  • 1 to 4 hours
  • 4 hours to 1 day
  • Chinese (Simplified)
  • Likely to Sell Out

bus travel nova scotia

  • The ranking of tours, activities, and experiences available on Tripadvisor is determined by several factors including the revenue generated by Tripadvisor from these bookings, the frequency of user clicks, and the volume and quality of customer reviews. Occasionally, newly listed offerings may be prioritized and appear higher in the list. The specific placement of these new listings may vary.

bus travel nova scotia

1. Peggy's Cove and Lunenburg Tour (small group)

bus travel nova scotia

2. Peggy’s Cove & Halifax Historic Tour

bus travel nova scotia

3. Halifax & Peggys Cove & Coastal

bus travel nova scotia

4. Half Day Small Group Tour in Peggy's Cove and Titanic Cemetery

bus travel nova scotia

5. Wine and Lunch Escape

bus travel nova scotia

6. Explore Baddeck and Cabot Trail in Nova Scotia

bus travel nova scotia

7. 6 Hours Mini Cabot Trail Tour

bus travel nova scotia

8. Private Heart Of The Island Tour in Nova Scotia

bus travel nova scotia

9. Baddeck & Bell Museum Tour

bus travel nova scotia

10. Valley Wine Tour

bus travel nova scotia

11. Best of Halifax Small Group Tour with Peggy's Cove and Citadel

bus travel nova scotia

12. Best of Cape Breton Small Group Tour from Sydney

bus travel nova scotia

13. Shore Excursion of the Glenora Distillery in Cape Breton

bus travel nova scotia

14. Private Cabot Trail Discovery Tour

bus travel nova scotia

15. Lunenburg Small Group Express from Halifax + Lobster Roll Lunch

bus travel nova scotia

16. Hidden Gems Tour Lunenburg

bus travel nova scotia

17. Peggy's Cove Day Trip from Halifax

bus travel nova scotia

18. Eat Halifax Food Tour

bus travel nova scotia

19. Cabot Trail Discovery Tour

bus travel nova scotia

20. Peggy’s Cove/Mahone Bay & Lunenburg

bus travel nova scotia

21. 1 Hour Blue Rocks Excursions from Lunenburg

bus travel nova scotia

22. Shared Cruise Excursion - "Mini" Cabot Trail

bus travel nova scotia

23. Halifax Now & Then

bus travel nova scotia

24. Bay of Fundy / Hall's Harbour

bus travel nova scotia

25. Wine Enthusiast Tour

bus travel nova scotia

26. Peggy's Cove Sunset + Halifax Dinner Small Group Night Tour

bus travel nova scotia

27. Peggy’s Cove

bus travel nova scotia

28. Cabot Trail Private Full Day Tour

bus travel nova scotia

29. Peggy’s Cove Small Group Sunset Tour from Halifax

bus travel nova scotia

30. Private Port of Sydney-Cape Breton Highlands ATV Excursion

What travelers are saying.

Travel D

  • Peggy's Cove Express Small Group from Halifax
  • Peggy's Cove and Lunenburg Tour (small group)
  • Peggy’s Cove & Halifax Historic Tour
  • Half Day Small Group Tour in Peggy's Cove and Titanic Cemetery
  • Private Tour in Halifax by a Luxury Vehicle with Informative Guide
  • Alternative Routes
  • Gray Line Halifax
  • TayMac Tours
  • TJ's Van & Car Pool Services Inc
  • Canada Airport Transfers

Nova Scotia: Bus Tours Information

Nova Scotia Tours & Vacations

Sunset with orange sky, waves and rocks Peggy's Cove lighthouse in Nova Scotia, Eastern Canada

This picturesque province will have you spellbound with its never-ending shorelines, magical lighthouses, and peaceful national parks. 

Turn your dream of exploring Canada’s east coast into a reality with our Nova Scotia tours and holidays. Full of coastal towns with plenty of whale-watching spots to get lost in, infinite seafood to fill up on, and over one hundred historic lighthouses to marvel at, this maritime destination offers outdoor adventure and extraordinary scenery for a trip you’ll never forget. Whether you want to immerse yourself in this province’s natural beauty, explore colorful fishing villages or treat your tastebuds to the sugary alcohol this region is known for, a journey through Nova Scotia is guaranteed to be one of your favorites. 

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Best of the Canadian Maritimes

The Maritimes: Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia travel FAQs

Do i need a covid-19 vaccine to join an intrepid trip.

Trips from 1 January 2023 onwards

From 1 January 2023, Intrepid will no longer require travelers to provide proof of vaccination against COVID-19 (excluding all Polar trips and select adventure cruises).

However, we continue to strongly recommend that all Intrepid travelers and leaders get vaccinated to protect themselves and others.

Specific proof of testing or vaccination may still be required by your destination or airline. Please ensure you check travel and entry requirements carefully.

How do I get to Nova Scotia?

There are plenty of ways to get to Nova Scotia including driving along the Trans-Canadian Highway and connecting with the Nova Scotia Highway 104, flying into Halifax Stanfield National Airport from various destinations within Canada, and catching public transport including ferry, bus, and train services. 

How do I get around Nova Scotia?

Getting around Nova Scotia is super easy if you're traveling with a car or able to rent one from the airport once you've landed.

Without a car, getting to and from different places in Nova Scotia becomes more difficult with no clear public transportation system that will take you to the popular/tourist locations.

There are bus and shuttle companies that operate day tours from places such as Halifax to Lunenburg, as well as public transport systems within the larger cities themselves that are reliable and efficient.  

What's the weather like in Nova Scotia?

Nova Scotia's weather features four distinct seasons throughout the year: warm to hot summers and cold, snowy winters.

The shoulder seasons of autumn and spring also experience typical weather patterns such as mild to warm temperatures and frequent rainfall. 

When is the best time to visit Nova Scotia?

Nova Scotia has something to offer in every season but the most popular time to travel to this maritime province is in summer when events and festivals are frequent and the weather's warm enough to lay out on its beaches.

The shoulder seasons of autumn and spring are also a great time to visit the region with fewer crowds, more availability, and lower accommodation prices than in the height of summer.

Some of the best things to do during these seasons are hiking and surfing. 

What do I pack for a trip to Nova Scotia?

What to pack for a trip to Nova Scotia is largely like packing for any other destination but it does depend on what time of the year you're traveling in.

Temperatures rarely get that high in summer so packing dresses, t-shirts, and shorts will do the trick.

If you're traveling in winter make sure you rug up with waterproof jackets, coats, lots of layers, and thick socks.

Regardless of the season you're traveling in, you should always pack sunscreen, a reusable drink bottle, a backpack or day bag, and a camera. 

Are Intrepid trips accessible for travelers with disabilities?

We are committed to making travel widely  accessible , regardless of ability or disability. We do our best to help you see the world, regardless of physical or mental limitations. 

We are always happy to talk to travelers with disabilities and see if we can help guide them toward the most suitable itinerary for their needs and, where possible, make reasonable adjustments to our itineraries.

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Atlantic Maritimes

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Atlantic Maritimes (13 days)

The world's highest tides, fresh salt air, sandy beaches, rocky coves, cosmopolitan cities, remote lighthouses, rich history, warm hospitality, rustic fishing villages, succulent seafood, unspoiled nature, varied activities, first-rate facilities and travel routes.  All of these things and more make Canada's Maritime Provinces one of the world's most popular destinations.  Experience the best of the Maritimes on this delightful tour of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

12 Nights' accommodation including 4 two-night stays 21 Meals including 2 lobster dinners Atlantic Canadian Tour Director or Driver Guide Meet and Greet Event Lobster Dinner Cruise on Shediac Bay Annapolis Valley Winery Tour & Tasting Peggy's Cove Confederation Bridge to Prince Edward Island World Famous Cabot Trail Fortress of Louisbourg National Historic Site Whale Watching Boat Tour (weather permitting)

DAY 1: Arrive Halifax, NS Arrive in  Halifax  and check in to your accommodations which are ideally located in the downtown core of this vibrant and cosmopolitan urban centre on the  Atlantic Ocean . Meet your Tour Director or Driver/Guide and fellow travelers this evening at a  Meet & Greet. Option: You may wish to add additional nights in Halifax to your vacation package.  Bursting with culture and rich history, Nova Scotia's capital city has much to offer. 

DAY 2: Halifax to Moncton, NB Explore the  Bay of Fundy  and learn about the world's highest tides as you meander its colourful coastline to  New Brunswick.   En route, explore the  Joggins Fossil Cliffs , a  UNESCO World Heritage Site , where you will see magnificently exposed layers of rock revealing the world's most complete fossil record of life in the "Coal Age" of 300 million years ago.  After crossing into  New Brunswick , an unforgettable culinary experience awaits as you enjoy a scrumptious lobster dinner on a lobster boat.*  Continue on to  Moncton  and check into your downtown hotel for the night. (Continental Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner) *This component is not available on the October 12, 2021 departure; the lobster dinner will be enjoyed at a restaurant in Moncton.

DAY 3: Moncton to Saint John, NB Experience a true natural wonder this morning at the  Hopewell Rocks  on the coast of the  Bay of Fundy . Marvel at these massive flower-pot shaped formations sculpted by the highest tides on the planet.  Travel through  Fundy National Park  on to Canada's first incorporated city,  Saint John,  on the southern New Brunswick coast.    Enjoy   a  city tour,  including the  Reversing Falls  where twice daily the  Bay of Fundy  tides force the  Saint John River  to reverse its flow.  Check into your  Saint John  accommodations for a two-night stay.  (Breakfast, Lunch)

DAY 4: St. Andrews by-the-Sea Day Trip Enjoy a day trip to picturesque  St. Andrews by-the-Sea  where the quaint charm of this coastal town is sure to captivate.   After a  Whale Watching Boat Tour  (weather permitting), the afternoon is yours to experience the friendly people, beautiful architecture, and rich marine life of this seaside gem at your own pace. (Breakfast, Lunch)

DAY 5: Saint John to Digby, NS Ferry back to Nova Scotia this morning and arrive in  Digby,  the scallop capital of the world,   where the fresh sea air and passionate Acadian culture combine to form an enchanting and historically rich town.  Check into the  Digby Pines Golf Resort & Spa  overlooking the  Annapolis Basin  on the  Bay of Fundy. (Breakfast, Dinner)

DAY 6: Digby to Halifax, NS Travel the lush Annapolis Valley where the French Acadians of Grand Pre made their first settlement in the early 1600's. Learn about this landscape's designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site as fact and fiction blend to reveal the romance of the Land of Evangeline . Visit a local winery for a tour and tasting before returning to Halifax for a two-night stay. (Breakfast)

DAY 7: South Shore Touring Discover the rustic charm of the renowned fishing village of Peggy's Cove where you will enjoy breakfast overlooking one of the most photographed lighthouses in the world. Travel the South Shore and on to the UNESCO World Heritage Town of Lunenburg, renowned for her fleets of Grand Banks' fishing schooners.  Take a walking tour to fully experience one of the most remarkably preserved colonial settlements in the New World, and visit the Fisheries Museum of the Atlantic to learn about the town's famous seafaring heritage. (Breakfast)

DAY 8: Halifax to Charlottetown, PE Learn about the Mi'kmaq people at  Millbrook Cultural & Heritage Centre  before crossing  Confederation Bridge , the world's longest continuous multi-span bridge, to  Prince Edward Island.     Check into your  Charlottetown  accommodations   for a two-night stay and enjoy a theatre performance by local entertainers at the  Confederation Centre of the Arts  (a substitution may be necessary due to the theatre schedule). (Continental Breakfast)

DAY 9: Prince Edward Island Touring Enjoy a  free morning  in Charlottetown, Canada's birthplace, or join a complimentary  walking tour  of the city.  This afternoon, tour the scenic  North Shore  of the island.  Drive by red cliffs, white beaches, gently sloping sand dunes and green fields of  Prince Edward Island National Park  and visit  Anne of Green Gables Heritage Place , the alluring inspiration of Lucy Maud Montgomery's classic books.  Experience true Maritime hospitality this evening at a traditional hall-style  lobster supper . (Breakfast, Dinner)

DAY 10: Charlottetown to Baddeck, NS Ferry over the  Northumberland Strait  back to  Nova Scotia  and proceed to  Cape Breton Island ,   the Scotland of North America, via the  Canso Causeway .  Visit  Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site  in  Baddeck  to learn of the many accomplishments of this genius who made his home on the island before checking into your accommodations on the  Bras d'Or Lake  where you will spend the next two nights. (Breakfast, Dinner)

DAY 11: Cabot Trail Touring Experience one of the most stunningly picturesque drives in North America today as you tour the  Cabot Trail  which winds around the rocky splendor of Cape Breton's northern shore, ascending to the incredible plateaus of  Cape Breton Highlands National Park .  Look-offs offer unforgettable vistas of Cape Breton's rugged coastline so be sure to have your camera on hand .   (Breakfast, Boxed Lunch, Dinner)

DAY 12: Baddeck to Halifax, NS The Fortress of Louisbourg National Historic Site  awaits today. This reconstruction of the original French town and fortifications, depicting one-fifth of the settlement of 1744 New France, is the largest of its kind in North America. Your tour continues along the shore of the Bras d'Or Lake to the mainland, and back to Halifax for one last night in the Maritimes. (Breakfast)

O ption: You may wish to continue your Atlantic Canada vacation and join us today on our Circle Newfoundland & Labrador tour.

DAY 13: Depart Halifax Atlantic Tours' arrangements end on check out from the hotel.  We hope that you have enjoyed your time with us and that we'll see you again soon! (Continental Breakfast)

Please Note: Our tours require easy to moderate levels of activity. Guests should be able to walk unassisted and be able to do flights of stairs. 

Accommodations

Mobility requirements.

Travelling with Atlantic Tours requires a certain level of activity and physical fitness to enjoy and take part in the tour.

While the specific requirements for each tour vary, in general, you MUST be able to:

· Enter and exit the motorcoach on your own.

· Enter and exit tour boats on your own.

· Climb stairs with ease.

· Walk up and down moderate to steep inclines.

· Walk on uneven surfaces.

· Walk distances of at least 100 feet at a reasonable pace.

· During walking tours, walk and stand for up to 2 hours.

· Manage your own luggage if luggage handling is not available.

Rates (CAD)

Regular Group Departures - up to 48 passengers

Per person Rates in CAD Rates are subject to 15% HST

Small Group Departures - up to 26 passengers 

Per person Rates in CAD  Rates are subject to 15% HST

Rates (USD)

Per person Rates in USD  Rates are subject to 15% HST/GST

Testimonials

The tour well exceeded my expectations from start to finish!  Tour guide and driver were excellent.  There is nothing, in my opinion that could have been done better.   B. Zehnder

You get your money's worth on this tour; Atlantic Tours did not minimize on any of the activities or meals.  Our tour guide and driver were absolutely wonderful ' it felt like a large family group by end of tour.  S. Wetherall

A very informative and beautiful journey of the Maritimes.  J. Robertson

Loved the whole trip ' start to finish!!  A Miller-Cheyne

Everything about this journey was absolutely awesome!  R. VanMackelberg

Add to your Vacation

Pre or post tour hotels.

Cambridge Suites Hotel Halifax Holiday Inn Express Halifax Airport Hotel ALT Halifax Airport Hotel

AIRPORT TRANSFERS

Airport Express Shuttle Bus - Halifax Private Town Car - Halifax

TRAVEL INSURANCE

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SIGHTSEEING & DAY TRIPS

Halifax Sightseeing Tours Peggy’s Cove Tour Lunenburg and Mahone Bay Tall Ship Silva Nova Scotia Dinner Cruise

Halifax Citadel National Historic Site Maritime Museum of the Atlantic Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

TRANSPORTATION

We can book your flights or rail transportation to and from your tour’s starting and end point. Ask us about rental car bookings for self-drive tours!

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A World in Reach

Nova Scotia Bucket List: 18 Best Things to Do

Planning a trip to Nova Scotia? Keep reading for a list of the top things to do in Nova Scotia for your Nova Scotia bucket list!

Nova Scotia, a gem in Eastern Canada, offers a mix of scenic landscapes and cultural richness.

This Maritime province is home to historic sites, wine and nature tours, and some of the most stunning coastlines in Canada.

I spent nearly a week in Nova Scotia. If I hadn't been visiting locals who knew the area well, I would have been overwhelmed with choices while deciding how to spend my time.

After my trip to Nova Scotia, I worked with a few Nova Scotia experts to put together this ultimate Nova Scotia bucket list .

This list includes some of the top things to do in Nova Scotia, including insider tips to make the most of your experience!

On this list, you’ll find some of  Nova Scotia’s must-see attractions  along with some of the province’s  top hidden gems .

Ready to check things off your Nova Scotia bucket list? Keep reading for a guide to the best things to do in Nova Scotia!

1. Spend a Day in Peggy's Cove

Peggy's Cove , located on the eastern shore of St. Margaret's Bay, is a quintessential stop for those exploring Nova Scotia's maritime heritage.

The ideal time to visit Peggy's Cove is from late spring to early fall when the weather is mild and the Atlantic views are at their most picturesque.

A visit to Peggy's Cove isn't complete without seeing its iconic lighthouse.

Standing on granite rocks, the Peggy's Point Lighthouse, built in 1915, offers breathtaking views of the Atlantic Ocean and is a perfect backdrop for photos. In fact, it's one of the most photographed spots in Canada!

The village of Peggy's Cove itself looks like a postcard, with its historic houses and buildings painted in bright, coastal colors.

Throughout the village, you'll find local artisans and quaint shops selling unique Nova Scotian crafts and souvenirs, as well as the typical kitschy souvenirs found at popular tourist destinations.

For a deeper dive into the area's history, the deGarthe Museum showcases the works of artist William E. deGarthe, famous for his paintings of Peggy's Cove.

Peggy's Cove is one of the most popular day trips from Halifax, and it's very easy to get there. You can book a day tour of Peggy's Cove from Halifax or make the scenic drive yourself, offering a chance to experience more of Nova Scotia's stunning coastline.

This is the best day tour of Peggy's Cove from Halifax !

2. Go Wine Tasting in the Annapolis Valley

The Annapolis Valley, a lush agricultural region in Nova Scotia, is a haven for wine enthusiasts that's sometimes known as the Napa Valley of the Northeast.

You can easily spend a day winery-hopping while also admiring the Valley's picturesque landscapes.

A must-visit destination in the Annapolis Valley is Luckett Vineyards. Known for its panoramic views and the unique phone booth in its vineyard, Luckett offers some of the best wines in the Valley.

Their tastings often include a selection of their best reds, whites, and the much-loved phone box wine.

You can also enjoy a meal at their on-site restaurant, which offers dishes made from locally sourced ingredients. Don't miss their fries with the truffle aioli!

Another must-visit is Benjamin Bridge Vineyard, renowned for its exceptional sparkling wines that have gained international acclaim.

The vineyard uses traditional methods and has a unique microclimate that contributes to the distinct character of its wines.

Don't miss trying the Nova 7, a refreshing wine that has become a signature of Nova Scotia's wine scene.

For those planning a visit, the Annapolis Valley is easily accessible from Halifax either by car or through organized tours.

One of the most fun ways to experience wine tasting in Annapolis Valley is the Classic Vintage Car Wine Tour .

The small-group tour, which picks up in Wolfville, takes you around in a vintage 1940s car to some of the best wineries in the Valley.

BOOK NOW: The Classic Vintage Car Wine Tour

3. Walk on the ocean floor at Burntcoat Head Park

Burntcoat Head Park, located along the shores of the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia, is a unique destination for those intrigued by natural wonders and maritime history.

The park is famous for having some of the highest tides in the world. Visitors can walk on the ocean floor at low tide and witness the dramatic rise and fall of the tides.

The highlight of the Burntcoat Head Park experience is exploring the ocean floor, where you can see the patterns etched into the seabed by the powerful tides.

The park offers guided tours that explain the unique geology of the area and the diverse marine life that inhabits the tidal zone.

Another highlight is the Burntcoat Head Lighthouse. The lighthouse and adjacent interpretive center provide insights into the local history and the significance of the Bay of Fundy's tides.

When planning your visit to Burntcoat Head Park, make sure to watch the tides and plan for visiting at low tide so that you can walk on the ocean floor.

While the park is still beautiful at high tide, being able to walk on the ocean floor at low tide is one of the most unique experiences that you can have on your Nova Scotia bucket list.

As you can probably guess, the ocean floor is a bit slippery and uneven. Wear sturdy, comfortable soles with good traction to keep from falling!

4. Explore the Halifax Waterfront

Exploring the Halifax Waterfront is one of the top experiences to add to your Nova Scotian bucket list.

The waterfront, stretching along the city's downtown area, combines historical charm with modern attractions, making it a must-visit destination.

The best time to explore the Halifax Waterfront is during the summer months, when the boardwalk is bustling with activity, and the harbour views are at their most stunning.

The area is a hub of entertainment, with street performers, local artisans, and waterfront festivals adding to the atmosphere.

For the perfect lunch on the waterfront, head to The Bicycle Thief , a renowned restaurant known for its "North American food with an Italian soul".

The Bicycle Thief is one of the top Halifax restaurants. It's perfectly located overlooking the harbour. You can't go wrong with anything on the menu!

For a sweet treat, trying Moonmist ice cream is a must.

This uniquely Nova Scotian flavor, a combo of banana, grape, and bubblegum, is a favorite among locals and visitors alike. It can be found at Sugah!, an ice cream shop along the waterfront.

Another iconic Canadian treat to try is a BeaverTail. These delicious pastries are hand-stretched to resemble a beaver’s tail and topped with a variety of sweet toppings. There is a BeaverTail stall located on the waterfront.

If you want to try all of the best foods along the waterfront, consider taking a Halifax Harbourfront food tour .

Aside from dining, the waterfront offers a range of activities.

You can explore maritime history at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, enjoy a harbour cruise , or simply relax by the water's edge, watching the boats go by.

5. Get spooked on the Halifax Ghost Walk

If you're interested in learning more about the haunted history of Halifax, consider adding the Halifax Ghost Walk to your Nova Scotia bucket list.

There are a couple of different guides who lead the ghost walk, with many of them being led by Dusty, a master storyteller and expert on Halifax's haunted past.

The tour starts at the Old Town Clock, a landmark steeped in history, then winds through the shadowy lanes and byways of Halifax.

Participants are taken to various locations known for their paranormal activity and historical significance, such as the Old Burying Ground and Saint Paul's Church.

My favorite stop on the tour was the one at Saint Paul's Church.

After the Halifax Explosion in 1917, a silhouette resembling a human face mysteriously appeared in one of the church's windows.

Despite attempts to clean or replace the glass, the image persisted, leading to various legends about its origin.

The tour eventually ends at the waterfront, with a couple of the spookiest stories being saved for last.

The Halifax Ghost Walk is a fun experience for anyone who enjoys hearing spooky stories and visiting historic sites.

Pro tip: The walk begins at the very top of Citadel Hill (you'll walk to the top after meeting at the clock) and ends all the way down at the waterfront.

If you want to avoid too much of an uphill journey at the end of the tour, I recommend parking somewhere halfway between the Citadel and the Waterfront.

Tours run from June to October. To book your spot on the Halifax Ghost Walk, send a message on Facebook or follow these instructions .

6. Stroll through the Halifax Public Gardens

Visiting the Halifax Public Gardens is one of the top things to do in the city.

These historic gardens, established in the 19th century, are a perfect spot for a peaceful stroll or a relaxing break.

The gardens are open yearly from May 1 through November 1. Visiting during the summer is best as there are blooms everywhere!

One of the standout features is the Victorian bandstand, which often hosts live music. Guided tours are available for those interested in learning more about the garden's history and the plants it houses.

7. Visit the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

by Riana from Teas poon of Adventure

One of the best things to do in Halifax is visit the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 to learn about how Canada has become one of the most multicultural countries in the world.

From 1928 to 1971, one million immigrants arrived at the port in Halifax to begin their new lives in Canada.

Start your journey at the Canadian Museum of Immigration by following in the footsteps of an immigrant arriving at Pier 21.

Walk along the side of a ship, enter the processing office, and look into recreated suitcases of what immigrants brought with them to Canada.

On the other side of the museum, the scope broadens to look at immigration to Canada outside of just Pier 21 in Halifax.

In addition to recreated rooms, there are interactive games, videos, and lots of artifacts to discover. You can even meet with an archivist to trace your own family’s immigration history through Canada.

As a Canadian, visiting the museum at Pier 21 was extremely impactful. I was filled with so much pride hearing from immigrants who made the move to Canada.

I also really appreciated that the museum didn’t shy away from Canada’s uglier history when immigration wasn’t open to everyone. 

My favorite part of the museum was a section where visitors could write about their own immigration experiences.

It was incredibly moving to read notes about how someone's grandparents arrived in Canada through Pier 21 or how happy they were that their families chose to move to Canada.

Give yourself lots of time to enjoy this incredibly well-put-together and emotional museum!

BOOK NOW: Canadian Museum of Immigration Tickets

8. Visit the Historic Town of Lunenburg

by Audrey from That Backpacker

The historic port town of Lunenburg is one of the jewels of Nova Scotia's South Shore, and it's a must-visit destination for travelers wanting to learn more about the province's fishing heritage.

The best time of year to visit Lunenburg is during the summer months when most tours and attractions are up and running for the public.

First on your list should be a visit to the Fisheries Museum of the Atlantic which is housed in a former fish processing plant.

Here you can learn about Lunenburg's fishing heritage and the best part is that there are volunteers and retired fishermen on site who are more than happy to answer questions and share stories.

Boat tours are aplenty in Lunenburg. The 1-hour harbour tour offers postcard-perfect panoramic views of the town, but there are also fishing tours, whale-watching tours, or sailing tours depending on your preference.

The Lunenburg Chandlery is another must-visit spot for a dose of fishing and shipbuilding history.

Just head east on Bluenose Drive until you see the red building with hundreds of colorful buoys out front.

This warehouse deals in supplies and equipment for ships and boats, plus you can also pick up some unique souvenirs.

And if you time your visit to Lunenburg right, you might just be able to set foot aboard the Bluenose II or even go for a sail!

This is a replica of an iconic fishing and sailing schooner that won many races and became known as the "Queen of the North Atlantic". The Bluenose can be seen on the Canadian dime and is the pride and joy of Nova Scotians.

You can book a day tour of Lunenburg from Halifax , or visit independently by taking a Maritime Bus from Halifax or driving yourself.

This is the best day tour of Lunenburg from Halifax !

9. Check out the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic

by Kim from Explore Your Bucket List

The location of Nova Scotia on the Atlantic Ocean has meant that many significant events have happened along these shores.

The Maritime Museum explores many of the incidents that have happened within its proximity, and it happens to be the oldest maritime museum in all of Canada.

The museum is located on the Halifax waterfront and the permanent exhibitions cover several interesting facts related to Nova Scotia’s maritime roots. 

They explore the history of shipbuilding in the Maritimes and describe the naval involvement during World War II. But the most significant and best-known exhibit is the devastating story of the Titanic and the important role that Halifax played.

Being the closest major port to the wreck site, many of those who perished in the sinking were brought to Halifax along with important personal artifacts including letters and photographs as well as pieces of the ship.

It is an impressive display that has been carefully curated to tell the story of that fateful day.

While it is a sobering exhibit, it does an excellent job of giving a full description of the ship's creation, life onboard, and the sinking and its aftermath.

The museum is open every day except Mondays in the winter season.

When planning a visit, be sure to check out the different admission rates depending on the season as well as the available discounts – see the museum website for eligibility requirements.

10. Go Whale Watching off Digby Neck

by Joanna from The World in My Pocket

Going whale watching is one of the bucket list experiences that you must do when you visit Nova Scotia.

One of the most popular places to go to see whales is the Digby Neck, located 40 minutes away from the town of Digby.

The best time to see whales in Nova Scotia is between July and September. After September, most of the companies stop running tours. In September you will also notice a reduced schedule, so make sure to book ahead of time.

The whale-watching companies are located in East Ferry, Tiverton, Freeport, and Westport. To reach them you will need a car, as there is no public transport available.

Also, bear in mind that you will need to cross by ferry, either once or twice, depending on where you are going, so keep in mind the crossing timings. The passage is free.

The whale watching experience is incredible. You will board a small fishing boat and go search for them in the Bay of Fundy.

The crew includes two marine biologists who can spot where the whales are, as well as answer any questions you may have about them.

The most common whales in the Bay of Fundy are the Humpback and the Minky. Besides whales, you can also see seals and different types of birds.

The tours last between 2 and 3 hours, depending on how close the whales are to the shore.

When you return to Digby in the evening, don’t miss having the famous seafood platter from The Crow’s Nest restaurant. They are serving some of the staples of the food in Nova Scotia , such as fried clams, lobster, and, of course, the Digby scallops.

11. Drive the incredible Cabot Trail

by Erin from Wanderlust with Kids

The Cabot Trail is an incredible drive in Cape Breton that is among the most scenic road trips in the world.

With breathtaking scenery and plenty of outdoor opportunities, this famous drive is one of the highlights of visiting Nova Scotia.

The Cabot Trail winds its way along rugged coastlines, through lush Acadian forests, and into charming coastal communities.

It passes through Cape Breton Highlands National Park, where you can stop at one of the many scenic viewpoints for stunning views of the coastline.

In addition to the stunning scenery, there are scenic trails to hike and campgrounds where you can stay overnight. There is an entrance fee of $8.50 for an adult (youth are free) to enter the park, even if you’re not staying overnight.

The Cabot Trail then continues through small fishing villages and coastal communities, where you can stop for a bite to eat or an overnight stay.

Keep an eye out for moose, eagles, and whales along the way, especially as you pass through Cape Breton Highlands National Park.

Cape Breton has a strong Acadian and Scottish heritage, and you’ll see road signs in both English and Gaelic, as well as Acadian French.

The Cabot Trail is a 298-kilometer (185-mile) loop and while it can be completed in a day, it’s recommended to take your time and make the drive a 2-day, or even longer if you have the time.

You can also purchase an audio tour of the Cabot Trail , which will guide you along the trail's points of interest and best views.

As the Cabot Trail is a loop, there’s no start and end point, but many start the journey in Baddeck, Cheticamp, or Ingonish.

Wherever you choose to begin the Cabot Trail, you’re in for an amazing journey. 

BOOK NOW: Cabot Trail Audio Tour

12. Visit the Halifax Citadel

by Chelsea from Adventures of Chels

A site to see on your Nova Scotia bucket list should be the Halifax Citadel.

Located right in the heart of Halifax is the historical citadel. The city was founded in 1749 and four fortifications have been built on this site to protect the city from enemies.

In 1935, the Citadel was declared a National Historic Site in Canada and is open year-round for visitors. It’s maintained by Parks Canada and was restored to the way it looked during the Victorian era.

While visiting the Citadel you’ll learn about the city and military history of Halifax and have a chance to visit the Army Museum.

During peak season (June 1 to September 15) admission to enter the fort is $12.50 for adults (18-64 years), $10.75 for seniors (65 years or older), and for youth (under 17 years) it’s free.

During shoulder season (May 1st-31st and September 16th-October 31st) prices are $8.50 for adults, $7.00 for seniors, and still free for youth.

While there’s an admission to go inside the Citadel, the space outdoors is free to walk around. Enjoy a stroll around the fort and take in the scenic views of the surrounding city and harbour.

Enjoy your visit to the Halifax Citadel National Historic Site!

13. See adorable puffins on a Puffin Tour

by Erin from Nova Scotia Bucket List

Nova Scotia is home to some incredible scenery and unique experiences, among those, the chance to see puffins in their natural habitat.

While other areas of the North Atlantic are more well-known for their puffins, Nova Scotia is also home to these cute seabirds.

Puffins spend most of their lives at sea but come ashore each year to nest.

The rugged coastline and rocky shores of Nova Scotia’s offshore islands provide a perfect place for puffins to nest.

However, since they don’t live on the mainland, a boat tour is necessary to view these incredible birds.

The best place to see  puffins in Nova Scotia  is the Bird Islands, just off the coast of Cape Breton.

Several companies offer puffin boat tours , which last a few hours and welcome adults and kids of all ages.

During the tour, you’re sure to see other seabirds, including terns, cormorants, eagles, and razorbills.

It’s also possible to take a puffin tour from Peggy’s Cove to Pearl Island, which is just off the shore of Mahone Bay, and one of the most southern nesting places of puffins in Nova Scotia.

Brier Island, which is known for whale-watching, also offers boat tours where you’ll have the chance to see dolphins, whales, seals, as well as puffins and other seabirds.

These puffin tours are an incredible experience and a memory that you won’t forget. 

14. Hike the Skyline Trail on Cape Breton Island

by Marianne from The Journeying Giordanos

The Skyline Trail in Cape Breton is a must-visit for anyone considering a trip to Nova Scotia.

This iconic trail is known for its jaw-dropping views of the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the incredible Cape Breton Highlands.

The Skyline Trail is located on the western side of Cape Breton Island, midway between Chéticamp and Pleasant Bay.

Just a heads up, the trail is situated inside Cape Breton Highlands National Park . This means that you will need to purchase a Day Pass from the Parks Canada Visitor's Centre in Chéticamp before you hike.

With a distance of around 8.7 kilometers (5.4 miles), the Skyline Trail is rated as easy to moderate, making the hike perfect for all skill levels. The loop trail takes about 2-3 hours to complete, going at an easy pace.

The majority of the trail is made up of crushed gravel, making it very accessible for families with young children, as well as people with varied mobility. The last section of the hike is comprised of a wooden boardwalk.

Just be aware, that the section of the boardwalk going down to the headlands is made up of a series of stairs. This is the most challenging part of the hike.

While the Skyline Trail is one of the most popular hikes in Nova Scotia, you will find plenty of parking at the trailhead. There is even parking for RVs and campers.

When planning your visit, consider going early in the morning or late in the afternoon to avoid crowds and have the best chance for wildlife sightings. In fact, a sunset hike is one of the most epic ways to experience the Skyline Trail.

15. Check out the town of Wolfville

by Kamila from Expat in Canada

Wolfville might be a small town but it definitely doesn’t lack in charm. It sits in the lushest part of Annapolis Valley, dotted with orchards and vineyards.

The city is home to historic Acadia University and the beautiful Harriet Irving Botanical Gardens .

The gardens are open to the public and free to visit, so you won’t want to miss it.

It’s a tranquil area with multiple trails and perfectly groomed plants to walk around. There is also an aesthetically pleasing historic greenhouse.

For a small town, Wolfville has a surprising number of cafes and restaurants. I recommend Troy , which serves Mediterranean cuisine, or Naked Crepe Bistro for delicious crepes.

Church Brewing is a cool spot to sample local craft beer. The brewery is in a former church and has stunning stained-glass windows. Their outdoor patio is a perfect place to enjoy a drink or two on a summer day.  

For cider lovers, Annapolis Cider Company is a must-visit. You can do a cider tasting to sample the top-notch ciders made from Annapolis Valley apples, and perhaps buy a bottle of cider to take home with you as a souvenir.

Their ciders are amazing, and they have interesting varieties like a combination of Earl Grey and blueberry. 

Timing is everything, and Wolfville is at its best in the summer or autumn seasons when the harvesting at local farm markets is in full swing. 

One of my favorite things to do in Wolfville is fruit picking at local U-pick farms - Elderkin’s, Hennigar’s, or Stirling’s. 

16. Explore Annapolis Royal

by Cate from Intentional Traveling

A great place to include on your Nova Scotia bucket list is the historic town of Annapolis Royal.

Annapolis Royal is a small town that can be fully explored in a day, but it is worth staying overnight in the summer,

During the day, be sure to visit the Annapolis Royal Historic Gardens. These exquisite gardens are considered to be one of the top five most beautiful gardens in North America.

With eleven acres to wander, you can easily spend an hour or two here. The rose gardens were my personal favorite!

You can also spend some time perusing the little shops and cafes on St. George Street.

For dinner, make a reservation at Restaurant Compose , where you can enjoy a stunning sea view during sunset. Make sure to take a stroll on the boardwalk along the water before or after dinner.

After dark, don’t miss the award-winning Candlelight Graveyard Tour at Fort Anne National Historic Site.

This tour only takes place in the summer months, but it is a fun and engaging way to learn about the history of the town!

If you want to stay overnight, I suggest staying at the historic Queen Anne Inn . This Victorian bed and breakfast will make you feel as though you have stepped back in time. 

Make sure to add this small historic town to your Nova Scotia itinerary! 

17. Visit Meat Cove

by Stefanie from Open Road Odysseys

If you’re looking for a place in Nova Scotia that’s a little off the beaten path, you should take a drive to Meat Cove.

Meat Cove is the northernmost settlement in Nova Scotia. The village itself is quite small but holds a lot of charm. It’s located about 28 kilometers (17.3 miles) from Cape North and the Cabot Trail, and the drive to get there takes approximately 35 minutes.

While Meat Cove may be tiny, there are quite a few things to see here to make the detour worth the drive.

One of the most popular things to do is camp at the local campground and get delicious seafood from Lawless Lobster , the food truck on site.

If camping isn’t your thing, they also offer cabins and a chalet guesthouse for those wanting to spend more time in the area in comfort.

Perhaps one of the most rewarding activities in the area is hiking. There are two popular trails here.

The first is the Meat Cove Overlook Trail . While it may be short, it offers gorgeous seaside views, a stunning vantage point of Meat Cove Beach, and is a short, fairly easy hike.

If you want more of a challenge, Meat Cove Mountain Trail fits the bill.

Other things to do in Meat Cove include checking out the community center, walking the boardwalk to the beach, kayaking around the coast, and eating at the Chowder Hut, which is also located at the campground.

One thing to note: the last 6 kilometers of road to Meat Cove is not paved, but is in decent shape, so any vehicle should be able to make the drive to the village with no problems.

18. Check out Ovens Natural Park

by Jenny from Traveling In Focus

Ovens Natural Park is an exquisite oasis tucked inside a private campground along the Atlantic coastline.

For a small day fee (unless you are staying at the park), you can enjoy this area steeped in history and natural beauty.

The park's roots date back to 1861 when there was a short but impressive gold rush. Today, you can indulge in the prospecting experience by sifting through beach sand at Cunard's Beach for specks of gold – a fun homage to the park's past.

But the main attraction of the park is its majestic sea caves, affectionately known as "ovens."

To see the sea caves, you will take the rugged coastal trail high on the cliffs. It's an easy trail with breathtaking panoramic views over the Atlantic Ocean.

Along the trail, there are several locations where you can descend into the caves, if you dare, and get an up-close view of the caves from within.

One, in particular, has an excellent view of the ocean as it pours into the mouth of the cave just below the platform you stand on. But watch out for the blow-hole, or you might be drenched for the remainder of your walk!

If the trail wasn't enough and you want more time exploring the caves, the park also offers kayaking tours to see them from a different perspective.

With its unique "ovens" and gold rush history, Ovens Natural Park shouldn't be missed on a visit to Nova Scotia.

Nova Scotia Bucket List: Final Thoughts

As you can see, there are so many amazing things to do all around Nova Scotia to include on your Nova Scotia bucket list.

Even if you can’t knock everything out in one visit, you’ll be ready to go back to the province for more exploring!

Have you been to Nova Scotia? What’s on your Nova Scotia bucket list?

Burntcoat Head Park at low tide

Nova Scotia Small Group Tours & Trips

29 nova scotia trips. tours from 20 tour companies. 17 reviews. 4.5/5 avg rating..

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The Maritimes: Nova Scotia

The Maritimes: Nova Scotia

Halifax, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island

  • See for yourself why the charming fishing town of Peggy’s Cove is one of the most photographed places in Canada.
  • Join a local guide for a walking tour of historic Old Town Lunenburg, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Walk the stunning coastal trails of Cape Breton Highlands National Park and follow the Skyline Trail mountain pass out to sweeping sea views.
  • Take a tour of the historic town of Baddeck, which marks the start (and end) of the famous Cabot Trail and is where Alexander Graham Bell had a summer home.

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What travelers are saying

"We joined the Intrepid “Real Italy Food Tour” and enjoyed it thoroughly. Our tour guide, Micol, was very knowledgeable and provided us with lots of good information. It seems Micol knew many of the staff of the venues we visited, including the pasta making class we attended. Our group of 11 travelers was extremely compatible, which greatly added to the fun and enjoyment."

Health Safety +

The Best of Nova Scotia: Highlands, History and Halifax

The Best of Nova Scotia: Highlands, History and Halifax

Nova Scotia

  • Travel along the world-famous Cabot Trail as it skirts along the edges of the stunning Cape Breton Highlands National Park, and learn about the wildlife and history of Cape Breton Island
  • Enjoy a study cruise with a chief naturalist to watch for whales and seabirds near Brier Island in the Bay of Fundy, where the local residents are outnumbered by seals and migrating birds
  • Visit the Gaelic College to watch kilt-makers at work, learn a bit of the Gaelic language and try out some Celtic dancing!

50 plus, Education / Learning

"Our family of four, including two adult children, took the Bicycling: Day Trips to Paradise in Canada. This trip is entirely outsourced to the owners of the inn, there are no Road Scholar employees involved in the trip. Two of us have taken bicycle trips all over the world and the bicycling component of this trip was disorganized, haphazard and almost unsafe. We all filled out forms giving details regarding our bicycle fitting months before the trip. On the first day, the leader Stephen, went around the room and asked the same questions and said everyone would get fitted in the morning before we began the first ride. The morning brought a rack of bikes, all different types in various levels of readiness. There were road bikes, hybrid bikes, mountain bikes and e-bikes. The rides were all on paved surfaces and the mountain bikes were heavy and the additional suspension added weight. The bike I received had rust on the chain and rear sprocket. When I asked about it, was told they were waiting for another van to show up with tools and equipment. Once it arrived, they gave me the lubricant to spray on the rust. My wife’s bike would not shift into the high gear on the front sprocket. Instead of adjusting the derailleur, they suggested spraying it with lubricant. Our one son is over six feet and needed a larger frame bike, even though he detailed it in the bike form months ago, there was no bike to fit him. One of the guides, then went home and brought a larger bike that was a full suspension mountain bike for him. The bike was very heavy, hard to control on the road and he felt unsafe. After two days, one of the guides convinced Stephen that they could adjust a hybrid bike to fit him. Clearly there was no work done to prepare the bikes for the trip. Many of the bikes needed adjusting and all needed lubricant to function easily. For every day, there was a tray of snacks placed out for us to take along the ride. None of the bikes had any baskets or attached bags, so if you didn’t bring a small day pack, there was no way to carry the snacks. For lunch on the rides, they brought exactly one sandwich for each rider. Since most of us get hungry while doing a day of exercise, it would have been helpful to have a few extras. On one day, they ran out of sandwiches and one of the leaders that were riding with us did not get lunch. Do NOT take this trip if you are expecting it to be a bicycling trip. We have used VBT and Discovery Bicycle Tours many times over the past 25 years and they are excellent bike tour companies. Lastly, after sharing these details with Road Scholar after the trip, their response was weak at best. After doing the full reviews and having to call them, their response was to give us $200 credit after spending $8000 on this trip. Not only was that insulting, they assumed that I would take another trip with their organization."

Bay Of Fundy Circle Of Tidal Wonders

Bay Of Fundy Circle Of Tidal Wonders

  • Immersed in the beauty of the Bay of Fundy and its coastal communities, learn how the force of the highest tides in the world create tidal bores, rapids, sea stacks, sea caves and arches
  • Learn about the present and future of tidal power generation at the only tidal power plant in North America and one of only a few in the world
  • Meet and ride the Tidal Bore on the Bay of Fundy, chasing and surfing the tidal surge in a stable, powered Zodiac

All Nova Scotia , expedition cruises, self guided adventures and vacation packages. Find the best guided and expert planned vacation and holiday packages. Read more about Nova Scotia

The Best of Iceland: A Country of Beautiful Contrasts

The Best of Iceland: A Country of Beautiful Contrasts

Akureyri, Nova Scotia

  • I’m comfortable with some walking throughout the day
  • I expect to get on and off of a coach, and I’m ready to stroll through cities and to stand for a few hours when we’re learning in museums

50 plus, Culinary & Wine, Education / Learning, High Adventure, Hiking & Walking, Nature & Wildlife, Train & Rail Journeys

Exploring Maritime Canada, from Southern Nova Scotia to Campobello Island

Exploring Maritime Canada, from Southern Nova Scotia to Campobello Island

Nova Scotia, Portland

  • In Southern Nova Scotia visit some of North America’s oldest and most picturesque maritime communities
  • Enjoy beautiful seaside landscapes and architecture during your stay in the Cottages at Roosevelt Campobello International Park
  • Hear the story of thousands of British Loyalists and escaped slaves who fled the US in the early 1780s

Fall Splendor in New England and the Maritimes: Montréal to NYC

Fall Splendor in New England and the Maritimes: Montréal to NYC

Boston, Montreal, New York, Nova Scotia, Portland, Quebec, York

  • Explore Montréal’s history, culture and architecture in Old Montréal, Mont Royal Park and the famous Notre-Dame Basilica
  • Discover the Canadian Maritime’s British and Acadian history in Halifax, Charlottetown and the Gulf of St
  • Experience coastal New England — Portland, Boston and Newport — at its best, bedecked in the colors of vibrant fall foliage

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Nova Scotia & Prince Edward Island 2021

Nova Scotia & Prince Edward Island 2021

Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island

  • A legacy of seafaring gems… think seaside shanties
  • picturesque fishing hamlets
  • colorful 19th-century timber homes
  • and wildlife-rich waters. Private evenings in historic Halifax include the Citadel
  • and moving stories of Canadian immigrants at Pier 21

"Sad to see a once good tour company stumble and fall into mediocrity. That’s Tauck post-Covid. My May 2023 tour of Normandy, Brittany and the Loire Valley was done on the cheap by Tauck, yet cost me thousands of dollars extra as a solo traveler on a special small-group tour. 

5-star hotels switched to 3 and 4 (without any compensation or explanation)… many more meals “on your own”… lots of “self-guided” tours of museums and chateaux and castles we knew nothing about… airline quality “rubber chicken” dinners, not in hotel restaurants, but in sad and isolated business convention spaces… poorly-trained newer Tour Directors (like the one on this tour) with limited experience traveling outside her tiny Canadian village or dealing with people from diverse backgrounds. She even confessed that this was a second gig job that took her away from her own business back home! You get what Tauck pays for, but unfortunately, not what YOU pay for. 

Speaking to a “Guest Relations” agent was comically pointless. She tried to make everything my fault, which I now understand is par for the course with the “new” post-Covid Tauck. Please reconsider spending huge amounts of your hard-earned money on a tour company that has lost its way and no longer delivers."

Canadian Maritimes 2021

Canadian Maritimes 2021

  • Time stands still in the Canadian Maritimes... preserving a way of life that honors the land and sea – and a cultural mix of early French
  • Scottish and English influences.Halifax invites reflection with gracious Victorian parks and gardens. Fishing hamlets in Nova Scotia celebrate their rich seafaring heritage. Diverse cultural influences are chronicled in Lunenburg; in Acadian rug making traditions that produced 'talking' works of art chronicling the struggles of pioneer families; and at the Gaelic College of Celtic Arts and Crafts. Culinary specialties are on the menu from fresh lobster on Prince Edward Island to a Nova Scotia oyster shucking demonstration to a “Kitchen Party” at the Keltic Lodge. Tauck's New Brunswick
  • Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia tour immerses you in the lure and lore of this down-to-earth
  • mystical world of mountain lakes

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Wonders of the Bay of Fundy

"Our mini vacation was wonderful. Pangea House was beautiful and our hosts were excellent. Very welcoming and accommodating, wonderful breakfasts and an amazing 5 course dinner. We especially appreciated all the cooking tips from Geoff. As it turns out, they lived just a few blocks from us in Toronto before moving to Gananoque. And the helicopter tour was great. I am afraid of heights but Scott was an excellent pilot, focused on our safety first but made the trip fun as well. And I felt totally comfortable! I will definitely keep you in mind when we plan another trip! Thanks again for all your help Pat and Jim"

Romance in the Wilderness

Romance in the Wilderness

Cape Breton Island Discovery Tour

Cape Breton Island Discovery Tour

Family Friendly

"Everything was pretty much perfect."

Cabot Trail Bike Adventure

Cabot Trail Bike Adventure

Best Nova Scotia Tours by Duration

Tours, Cruises & Private Trips

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Nova Scotia Reviews & Ratings

M Anne Capper

Enchanting Canadian Maritimes

Itinerary: plausible, excellent. Canada has long stretches of "rocks, and trees and water". We're BIG. Coach: compared with European tours, somewhat lacking... no 2...

Tour:   Enchanting Canadian Maritimes

Sally Doerksen

The days start very early in the morning. The tour guides are in...

Laurel Sawatzky

It was interesting but not enchanting. The hotel in Baddeck was disappointing and should be taken off the list. It needed some TLC and was outside of Baddeck. We wer...

Michael Wager

all our stops were great and our guide ,bus driver, and health person were very freindly and fun

David Wolfer

It is filled with beautiful landscapes and ocean scapes. It involves h...

See all Nova Scotia reviews

Nova Scotia Tour Selection Trips

  • Nova Scotia is pretty large, which means lots of driving. Consider this when deciding accommodation. It may be easier to book a few places rather than trying to do day trips from a home base.
  • There are many outdoor water activities. Being on the north Atlantic ocean, the water is cold year round. Consider traveling in the late summer once the Ocean has the ability to warm up a bit.
  • While the summer offers awesome water based activities, the winter equally is a great time to visit. If you can handle the cold, (temperatures in peak winter are often below freezing), there is skiing, ice skating, and sleigh rides through snowy Nova Scotia.
  • If you’re looking to visit museums, consider a museum pass. The Nova Scotia museum pass is $47 CAD, and let’s you visit any museum in Nova Scotia for 12 months.
  • Public transportation in Nova Scotia is a bus system. Buses can take you around the city center, and out to the suburbs. For further distances, look into the Maritime Bus, which will connect most of the Province’s towns/cities.

Additional details

Where is Nova Scotia?

Nova Scotia is a province in eastern  Canada on the Atlantic Ocean. The province is east of the state of Maine, Southwest of New Brunswick, South of Prince Edward Island , and Southwest of Newfoundland.

Weather in Nova Scotia

The weather in Nova Scotia depends on the season, with warm summers and winter often dropping below freezing. The middle of winter often has temperatures between 0-32 degrees Fahrenheit. Locals know to expect snow for most of the winter, so they make the most of the chilly weather.

If colder weather and winter activities are your thing, this is a great time to visit. There are festivals, snowshoeing, ice skating and sleigh rides, making this a real life winter wonderland.

Summer brings warm weather, and a whole new experience to Nova Scotia. Temperatures range from 70-80 degrees, making it ideal weather to get outdoors and enjoy the natural beauty of the province. Spend the day relaxing at the beach, hike through the Cape Breton Highlands, or hang out at one of the many street festivals.

If you’re hoping for a balance between the two, consider visiting during the spring or fall. The earlier part of spring (mid-March to late April) is still a bit chilly with daily averages of 32-50 degrees fahrenheit. Later in the season is when the warm weather starts to kick in, with temperatures rising to 50-70 degrees.

You can expect the reverse for the fall, with warmer temperatures early in the season, cooling down as the fall season goes on.

Best time to visit Nova Scotia

The best time to visit depends on what activities and experiences you want to get out of your trip. There really is no “bad time” to visit Nova Scotia, and all seasons are worthy of a visit. There is plenty of activity year-round.

Summer is a popular season, because of the warm weather and the high amount of outdoor activities. For anyone hoping to spend a lot of time on the water (kayaking, swimming), it’s better to go during summer. Most  whale watching tours in Nova Scotia  don’t start until June, so if this is high on your list, consider holding off until summer.

If you’re hoping to experience the warm weather without the crowds of summer, try going in should season, when the crowds have thinned out. Late April-early May is a great time for this, before school is let out for the summer, or in late September-Early October when school has started again.

Even in the warmer months, it’s a good idea to bring a light jacket or another layer, especially if you’re near the water, as it can get a bit chilly. A notable reason for fall being a popular time to visit is the changing of the leaves. The autumn colors are pretty are pretty impressive, and is worth considering a fall visit.

Who Will Enjoy Traveling in Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia is a great destination for various visitors. The most common types of visitor for the region is one who likes to be outdoors. As said above, there is plenty of outdoor activities, from hiking , to cycling , to spending time on the water.

Many people head to Cape Breton Highlands to get kick their active drive into gear. There are beaches and paths to explore the great outdoors. Follow the cabot trail through the winding roads to the top of the cliffs for jaw-dropping views. This track is especially popular for motorcyclists. When the winter season hits, hiking trails turn into great snowshoeing opportunities. Hit the slopes for skiing or sledding.

Those who like to explore shops, museums, and spend time indoors are also in for a treat. The best place to visit for this type of travel is to Halifax, the capital of Nova Scotia.

The city is filled with museums, galleries, and historic sites. Learn about immigration at the Canadian Museum of Immigration, or spend some time at the new Discovery Centre off the Halifax waterfront. Pop through the various distilleries and breweries around the city.

Common Nova Scotia Tour Routes

Common tour routes include a visit to the three Canadian Maritimes provinces , New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island (PEI) and Nova Scotia. Options include driving through the provinces, or sometimes, taking a cruise through the maritimes.

Road trips usually stop in major cities such as Saint John, NB; Charlottetown, PEI; over to Nova Scotia towards Halifax. If you’re taking a cruise, the ports are a bit different, starting in Halifax, over towards Charlottetown, and sailing around New Brunswick through the Gulf of St. Lawrence towards Quebec.

Road trip routes through Nova Scotia alone are also a great way to see the region. A common route starts in Halifax, spending some time exploring the capital. The road trip heads west, stopping at Peggy’s cove and Lunenburg. Keep heading west towards Yarmouth, and explore the southwestern shores of the province, before heading north.

Make a stop in Digby, home to the famous digby scallops you can hand pick, before heading towards the coastal town of Annapolis Royal. Continue driving east towards Cape Breton Island to explore one of the most picturesque places in Canada ! After a stop on the island, many visitors make their way back towards Halifax. If you’re short on time (less than a week), it’s better to break up this trip.

Either head west from Halifax and tackle Peggy’s cove, Yarmouth, and Digby, or break up the time between Halifax and Cape Breton Island. While the drive is beautiful, there is a fair amount of driving, and the whole trip shouldn’t be spent in the car driving between places!

Always Find the Best

On Travelstride you can find 29 trips to Nova Scotia and more than 20,000 trips worldwide ranging from budget to luxury and private guided to group tours and everything in between. Only on Stride can you find and compare expert-planned trips from 1,000+ tour operators, cruise lines and local experts. Read traveler and professional reviews so you can confidently find your perfect trip.

Winter walloped: snow-weary Nova Scotia digs out from latest blast

Halifax transit service has resumed, but buses in cbrm have been pulled off the road.

bus travel nova scotia

Atlantic Canada sees 2nd major snowstorm in less than 2 weeks

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Many people in Nova Scotia were once again digging out from a blizzard on Wednesday, less than two weeks after a historic storm left some people snowed into their homes for days.

The strong nor'easter brought upwards of 30 centimetres of snow to some areas of the province, and cleanup in Cape Breton was compounded by a recent multi-day snowfall that dumped 150 centimetres in downtown Sydney .

With snowbanks already piled high, RCMP were urging people to stay off the roads, Cape Breton Regional Municipality cancelled transit service and all public schools on the island were closed.

RCMP Cpl. Gary McLaughlin said high winds and blowing snow were creating the worst road conditions he's seen in the 16 years he's been a traffic services officer.

"I've worked throughout some of the snowiest areas in British Columbia in the mountain passes. This trumps all of them. I have never in my life seen anything like this," McLaughlin told Information Morning Cape Breton.

McLauhglin said several vehicles became stuck on the province's 100-series highways, making it difficult for plows to keep them open for emergency crews.

"The highway crews are strapped to the max right now, just trying to keep corridors open to the hospital," he said.

WATCH | Volunteers in Cape Breton shovelling to clear paths

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Rescue team in Cape Breton poised to help after snowstorm

Some people in Cape Breton remained snowed-in for days following the storm on Feb. 2-4, prompting the province to ask for help from the federal government.

Team Rubicon, a veteran-led humanitarian organization that helps communities in times of crisis, has been on the ground in Cape Breton since Feb. 8.

It's the first time they've helped with a significant snowfall, but team members were told to stand down on Wednesday morning until conditions improved.

"Tow trucks aren't allowed on the road. RCMP is just begging people not to go on the road," said incident commander Christian Saulnier, adding he hoped teams would be able to venture out later Wednesday.

"We take care of ourselves first. We have to be ready to deploy and we have to make sure it's safe."

Saulnier said a team of 55 people would be helping to shovel people out, which could save crucial minutes in the event of a medical emergency.

A pickup truck is shown on a snowy street in Sydney.

Cape Breton Regional Police Const. Gary Fraser said there were about a dozen vehicles stranded and blocking roads in the municipality. He said that's another reason people were being urged to stay home.

"With the high winds, it's hard to see anything coming toward you, or if there's a car stranded on the side of the road, you could run into it," he said. 

"I know people do have to get out. Drive very, very, very cautious. It's extremely, extremely bad out."

CBRM's public works department said crews would focus on the main roads Wednesday, but side roads would likely have to wait. It says Transit Cape Breton will not operate on Thursday. Garbage collection that was scheduled for Wednesday has been rescheduled for Sunday and collection Thursday has been rescheduled for Monday.

Many schools across mainland Nova Scotia were also closed on Wednesday, including the Halifax, South Shore, Strait and the Chignecto-Central regional centres for education.

Halifax Transit pulled its buses off the road Tuesday night, but service resumed Wednesday morning.

bus travel nova scotia

Drivers stranded, stuck in vehicles after latest snowstorm, Cape Breton police say

Some provincial government offices were forced to close or delay opening, and a handful for flights were cancelled at Halifax Stanfield International Airport.

CBC meteorologist Tina Simpkin said the storm was moving into Newfoundland Wednesday morning, but heavy snow continued to fall in eastern Cape Breton.

As the powerful storm blew through the province Tuesday evening, a notification sent to Halifax Regional Municipality's mass notification system warned there were "many accidents and delays" in the region.

Nova Scotia's Department of Public Works said Tuesday night on X that several tractor-trailers were stuck on Highway 102.

Halifax Ground Search and Rescue was checking in on people living in tents. It was also offering to take people to emergency shelters to ride out the storm.

bus travel nova scotia

When this much snow falls, how exactly is it cleared?

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

bus travel nova scotia

Reporter/Editor

Aly Thomson is an award-winning journalist based in Halifax who loves helping the people of her home province tell their stories. She is particularly interested in issues surrounding justice, education and the entertainment industry. You can email her with tips and feedback at [email protected].

With files from Nicola Seguin, Information Morning Cape Breton, Tom Ayers

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Funding supports a feasibility study for the electrification of school bus fleets in Atlantic Canada

From: Infrastructure Canada

News release

A feasibility study supporting the electrification of provincially owned school bus fleets in Atlantic Canada is underway after a combined investment of $495,000 from the federal government and the governments of New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Nova Scotia through the Council of Atlantic Ministers of Education and Training.

Halifax Regional Municipality, Nova Scotia, February 23, 2024 — A feasibility study supporting the electrification of provincially owned school bus fleets in Atlantic Canada is underway after a combined investment of $495,000 from the federal government and the governments of New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Nova Scotia through the Council of Atlantic Ministers of Education and Training.

This was announced by Minister Sean Fraser, Minister Bill Hogan, Minister Krista Lynn Howell, and Minister Becky Druhan. The study will develop a roadmap that will enhance the provinces’ knowledge of zero-emission transportation and provide valuable insights for decisions needed to proceed with the electrification. The roadmap will also cover infrastructure requirements, timelines, emissions reduction, long-term cost savings, and ensure that the provinces are prepared for deployments.

The study’s overall objective is to help determine the requirements for electrification and assess the feasibility of transitioning up to 1,250 school buses in New Brunswick, up to 326 school buses in Newfoundland and Labrador, and up to 1,300 school buses in Nova Scotia to electric power. The initiative would contribute to a cleaner and more sustainable future for school transportation in the regions. Prince Edward Island has already initiated the conversion of its school bus fleet to electric vehicles in 2021, setting an example for the rest of the Atlantic provinces.

"Transitioning to electric school buses represents a significant step in curbing greenhouse gas emissions, improving air quality, and helping integrate environmentally friendly technologies in the transportation sector. We will continue working with partners across the country to reduce carbon emissions and advance a more sustainable transportation system." The Honourable Sean Fraser, Minister of Housing, Infrastructure and Communities
“Exploring sustainable transportation solutions is one step towards a cleaner and greener future for our students and our communities. The Province of New Brunswick is pleased to participate in this study and we look forward to seeing the results.” The Honourable Bill Hogan, Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development of New Brunswick
“Our Provincial Government strives to create positive educational experiences for students while also addressing environmental concerns. I thank the Federal Government for their investment in this initiative, along with the support of the Council of Atlantic Ministers of Education and Training, to investigate the feasibility of electrifying school bus fleets in the Atlantic provinces. I look forward to receiving the report to inform future actions related to the electrification of school buses in Newfoundland and Labrador.” The Honourable Krista Lynn Howell, Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development of Newfoundland and Labrador
“Nova Scotia is committed to a clean and healthy province – for current and future generations. In joining the Atlantic Electric School Bus feasibility study, the Province of Nova Scotia is helping to find ways to create safe, zero-emission travel to and from school for our students.” The Honourable Becky Druhan, Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development of Nova Scotia

Quick facts

The federal government is investing $396,000 in this project through the Zero Emission Transit Fund (ZETF). The Council of Atlantic Ministers of Education and Training is contributing $99,000.

The ZETF helps communities transition to zero emission transit and school buses to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and contribute to Canada’s net-zero emissions targets. By electrifying their bus fleets, communities are working toward a cleaner environment for our kids while creating jobs and supporting Canadian manufacturing. 

This Fund is closely coordinated with the Canada Infrastructure Bank’s (CIB) Zero Emission Bus Initiative through which the CIB has committed more than $1.5 billion to supporting the deployment of zero emission buses.

The federal government is investing billions of dollars to provide predictable federal public transit funding which will be available to support reliable, fast, affordable, and clean public transit solutions beginning in 2026-27. 

Since 2015, the federal government has announced an unprecedented investment of over $30 billion in thousands of transit projects in communities across the country.

The Zero Emission Transit Fund complements Canada’s strengthened climate plan: A Healthy Environment and a Healthy Economy. Through the plan, the federal government has committed to providing permanent federal funding for public transit in support of making clean and affordable transportation options available in every community.

The funding announced today builds on the federal government's work through the Atlantic Growth Strategy to create well-paying middle-class jobs, strengthen local economies, and build inclusive communities.

Associated links

  • Zero Emission Transit Fund
  • Strengthened Climate Plan
  • Federal infrastructure investments in New Brunswick
  • Federal infrastructure investments in Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Federal infrastructure investments in Nova Scotia

For more information (media only), please contact:

Micaal Ahmed Communications Manager Office of the Minister of Housing, Infrastructure and Communities 343-598-3920 [email protected]

Media Relations Infrastructure Canada 613-960-9251 Toll free: 1-877-250-7154 Email: [email protected] Follow us on Twitter , Facebook , Instagram and LinkedIn Web: Infrastructure Canada

Charles Renshaw Communications Officer Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Government of New Brunswick [email protected]   

Lynn Robinson Media Relations Manager Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Government of Newfoundland and Labrador [email protected]     

Alex Burke Director of Communications Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Government of Nova Scotia [email protected] 902-430-7553

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  3. The Best Day Tours from Halifax, Nova Scotia

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  4. THE 10 BEST Nova Scotia Bus Tours (Updated 2023)

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  5. Bus Tours from Nova Scotia

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  6. 5 of the Best Day Trips from Halifax, Nova Scotia

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COMMENTS

  1. Public Transit and Shuttle Service

    Public Transit and Shuttle Service in Nova Scotia Footer menu Languages English Français Deutsch © 2023 NovaScotia.com. All Rights Reserved. Looking for someone else to do the driving while you get to experience the wonderful views from all over Nova Scotia? Discover the available services.

  2. Nova Scotia Travel Guide (Updated 2024)

    A comprehensive budget travel guide to Nova Scotia with tips on transportation, costs, savings, things to do, accommodation, and more! ... Bus - Taking the bus is the best way to get around Nova Scotia if you don't have a car. Maritime Bus connects most towns in the province. A two-hour trip from Halifax to Lunenburg is 26 CAD, while ...

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    Six amazing road trips in Nova Scotia. Bus. Maritime Bus is a coach service with over 50 locations throughout the Maritimes, favored by students, budget travelers, and used by locals as a way to deliver large packages at a cheaper rate than the post office. In Halifax, the Maritime Bus station is located adjacent to the VIA rail train station ...

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    What bus companies travel to Halifax, Nova Scotia? Located in Nova Scotia, Canada, Halifax is accessible by bus from 24 other cities. You can choose from 98 daily scheduled trips when you search for buses to Halifax on Wanderu. Maritime Bus usually has the most buses on any given day.

  11. Getting Around

    Electric Vehicle (EV) Car Charging Stations in Nova Scotia With over 100 public car charging stations available throughout Nova Scotia. Discover the many ways available for you to travel in Nova Scotia

  12. Toronto to Nova Scotia

    There are 8 ways to get from Toronto to Nova Scotia by plane, bus, car ferry, car or train Select an option below to see step-by-step directions and to compare ticket prices and travel times in Rome2Rio's travel planner. Recommended option Fly Toronto to Sydney • 3h 57m Fly from Toronto (YYZ) to Sydney (YQY) YYZ - YQY $363 - $1,337 Cheapest option

  13. 10 Best Nova Scotia Tours & Trips 2024/2025

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    Night bus, train • 30h 29m. Take the night bus from Boston to Montreal Greyhound US0260. Take the train from Montréal to Halifax VIA Rail. $201 - $325.

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    There are 2 intercity buses per day from Montreal to Halifax. Traveling by bus from Montreal to Halifax usually takes around 19 hours and 25 minutes, but the fastest Maritime Bus bus can make the trip in 19 hours, Distance. 491 mi (790 km) Shortest duration. 19h 0m.

  17. THE 10 BEST Nova Scotia Bus Tours (Updated 2024)

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  18. Best Nova Scotia Tours & Vacations 2024/2025

    Destinations Canada Nova Scotia Tours & Holidays This picturesque province will have you spellbound with its never-ending shorelines, magical lighthouses, and peaceful national parks. Turn your dream of exploring Canada's east coast into a reality with our Nova Scotia tours and vacations.

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    Travel Info. Getting Here. Nova Scotia is closer than you think! Travel by air, by sea on a ferry or cruise, or by land. Discover all of your travel options today and start planning.

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    Ask an Agent. Our trained and experienced agents are here to help! 1-800-565-7173. Email Us. Atlantic Tours & Travel. Travel specials and great vacation deals for locations around the globe. Proudly showcasing Atlantic Canada and the world since 1968.

  21. Nova Scotia Bucket List: 18 Best Things to Do

    1. Spend a Day in Peggy's Cove. Peggy's Cove, located on the eastern shore of St. Margaret's Bay, is a quintessential stop for those exploring Nova Scotia's maritime heritage.. The ideal time to ...

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    Culinary specialties are on the menu from fresh lobster on Prince Edward Island to a Nova Scotia oyster shucking demonstration to a "Kitchen Party" at the Keltic Lodge. Tauck's New Brunswick. From $4,190. 11 days $381 / day. Small Group Tour. Quick view.

  23. Ontario to Nova Scotia

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  24. Winter walloped: snow-weary Nova Scotia digs out from latest blast

    Nova Scotia's Department of Public Works said Tuesday night on X that several tractor-trailers were stuck on Highway 102. Halifax Ground Search and Rescue was checking in on people living in tents.

  25. Funding supports a feasibility study for the electrification of school

    Halifax Regional Municipality, Nova Scotia, February 23, 2024 — A feasibility study supporting the electrification of provincially owned school bus fleets in Atlantic Canada is underway after a combined investment of $495,000 from the federal government and the governments of New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Nova Scotia through the Council of Atlantic Ministers of Education and ...

  26. Packages

    Make planning your trip even easier by taking advantage of packages which pair up transportation, accommodations, meals, tickets to events or attractions, guided tours and/or an activity or experience.

  27. Halifax Transit suspending services on Saturday afternoon due to heavy

    All transit services throughout Halifax will be suspended as of 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, as heavy rain and wind persist throughout the region before temperatures rapidly drop this evening.

  28. Flash freeze warning issued for most of mainland Nova Scotia, Cape Breton

    Environment Canada has issued a flash freeze warning for most of mainland Nova Scotia and all of Cape Breton. Heavy rains are expected to give way to rapidly plunging temperatures Saturday.The weather agency says temperatures will dip to around -10 C by this evening."Untreated surfaces such as highways, roads, walkways, and parking lots may become icy, slippery, and hazardous," it said. "Be ...